Journey Mapping: What Is It Good For? Absolutely Anything!

Deanna Laufer

I recently had the pleasure of facilitating three customer journey mapping workshops for clients. For me, the most rewarding part of these workshops is when, all of a sudden, you see the light bulb go on for the participants. It can be the realization that their customer has to jump through an inordinate number of hoops to submit a simple service request or have to wait 5-10 days for repair. Or, when the workshop participants realize they have no idea what their customers are doing or thinking, but maybe they should.

Just as the light bulb moment can be different for each person, the insights they deem most valuable can vary, and include:  

  • Ideas for designing future-state experiences. A group of participants from a retailer created a future-state journey map illustrating how customers could sign up for a credit card and rewards program while shopping in store. They identified scenarios for how store associates could approach customers with credit card offers without seeming intrusive, as well as appropriate opportunities to follow up with customers by email or mobile app if they chose not to enroll right away. These types of insights can then inform the design of the new credit card and rewards experience.
  • A sense of empathy for the customer. We ask workshop participants within the same organization to wear name tags because, not only do we not know them, but most of the time they don’t know each other. In one workshop, the organization was siloed, as most are, and each participant owned their own small functional part of the customer journey. But no one had insight into or ownership of the entire process. When brought together to analyze the health of the end-to-end journey, participants walked away with a shared understanding that what they were each doing individually wasn’t working for the customer as a whole.
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Consumer Engagement Is Shifting Toward Micro Moments

Jeffrey Hammond

Happy iPhone 6 day. If you're reading this you're proabably not standing in line hoping to get your hands on Apple's latest devices. My colleague Mike Facemire drove past the local Apple store in Back Bay last night at 1 A.M. on the way home from Logan airport and described the scene as "nuts". The line was completely around the block, in 40 degree weather no less.

Developers should pay attention, as there's more going on here than hipsters queuing for the latest shiny. Today Mike, Julie Ask, and yours truly published a research note for eBusiness professionals detailing the top ten ways to leverage Apple’s new tech. Central to our argument is that iOS 8 takes many steps to break down the barriers between custom 3rd party apps and Apple's mobile platform. Mobile developers used to be constrained to their own secure, sand-boxed containers with minimal access to sensors on the device and local storage, but separated from other custom apps. As a result, we saw development teams gradually move toward "least common denomiator" apps that saved money by using a common code base.

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How do you measure customer loyalty? Let me count the ways.

Emily Collins

mixed up measure

I recently interviewed a number of companies about their approach to customer loyalty. In each conversation I asked a variation of the question "How do you define and measure customer loyalty?" And what struck me is that while many companies define loyalty using various terms like share of wallet, length of relationship, engagement, and customer value, they often measure it using only transactional metrics. Now, there are various reasons for this. Some don't have access they to the data they need to gage emotional loyalty. Others don't have the analytics capabilities or resources they need to pull the pieces together. But loyalty if multi-faceted, complex, and has emotional and rational aspects that aren't mutually exclusive, and certainly can't be reduced to a single metric.

So what should you do? First, heed my rallying cry: It's time to push past purchase as a proxy for loyalty. Second, Forrester can help. Loyalty may be difficult to measure, but it's not impossible. My latest research report provides a framework that buckets loyalty measurement into four, cooperative levels:

  • Programmatic measurement assesses loyalty program health. These metrics explain how the loyalty program grows in size, scope, and activity level over time. Sample metrics include enrollment rates, offer response rates, and program usage.
  • Purchase measurement quantifies the customer relationship. These metrics explain how the loyalty strategy improves customer profitability. Sample metrics include average order value, frequency, and basket assortment.
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The CIO, CMO and Digital Leadership

Nigel Fenwick

digital business demands a healthy CMO CIO partnershipThe 2014 CMO CIO Survey in conjunction with Forbes offers an opportunity for your voice to be heard in our research.

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The Great Race to Develop a Digital Experience Delivery Backbone

Stephen Powers

“A unified platform for content, community and commerce.”

“A complete set of integrated solutions helps you maximize and measure your impact in more ways than ever before.”

“Everything you need to deliver unique and personal customer experiences.”

Unified. Complete. Everything you need. These quotes are pulled directly from the marketing materials of some of the biggest players in the digital experience delivery space. One piece of software that addresses all of your company’s needs in delivering top-of-the-line customer experience. Sound too good to be true?

Yeah. We thought so too.

Vendors are piecing together discrete capabilities to form what we at Forrester call digital experience delivery platforms, which aim to manage, deliver, measure, and optimize experiences consistently across every digital touchpoint. Vendors from content, commerce, and marketing backgrounds are playing in this space, and Forrester clients increasingly mention them together when considering a vendor to act as their delivery backbone (a year ago, we certainly wouldn’t have heard IBM and hybris mentioned in the same inquiry for non-transactional needs, as we did recently).

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Data-Driven Design Reshapes Businesses And Experiences

Tony Costa

As I wrote in my previous blog post and report on The Data-Driven Design Revolution, the digitization of customer experiences – both online and in physical environments – has greatly expanded the depth and breadth of customer data available. This abundance of data has profoundly changed how experience design teams use and manage customer data. Its impact, however, doesn’t end there. This newfound abundance of customer data also fuels new business pressures and experiences.  Chief among them being:

  • Organizational velocity is the new competitive differentiator, driving experiences to operate in real time, all the time. The speed with which companies can convert customer data into insights and insight into action is now a critical differentiator. Companies can no longer rely on linear approaches to data analysis — spending six months to gather data on a problem, many more months to analyze it, and even longer to act on it. Doing so will cause companies to bleed customers away to more nimble competitors. As Marc Andreessen recently tweeted, “Cycle time compression may be the most underestimated force in determining winners and losers in tech.”
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Extended Google Analytics Benchmark Capabilities Threaten To Disrupt

James McCormick

Blogged in collaboration with Samantha Ngo, Senior Research Associate, serving Customer Insights professionals.

You’ve heard us saying a thousand times: the buzz about big data isn’t about the amount of data you’ve collected; it’s how you digest that data and turn it into actionable insights. With the revamp to Google Analytics’ (GAs) benchmarking, Google is taking the next steps in allowing us common folk to process data in a platform with a simple UI, built to enable you to draw insights to catalyze actionable improvements to your marketing program.

Google’s vision is there. GAs extended benchmarking capability  – available to free and premium users - offers some sparkly new features such as 1600 industry categories (previously 26), size buckets, and location filters that allow for basic segmentation; and, the tool can automatically place you within one of these categories according to your web traffic, etc. Also, you have to give to get: Opting out of allowing Google to collect your information anonymously means you won’t have access to benchmarking features. Given GA’s huge deployment footprint — we’re talking about big time big data and a great opportunity for firms of all sizes and verticals to compare themselves to relevant markets.

But as you excitedly dive into Google’s benchmarking big data lake you should consider that;

  • This isn’t quite ready for enterprise. For the moment the benchmarks can only be viewed via Google reports; and digital marketers will not be able to suck this benchmark data (via APIs etc..) into their favourite dashboarding or BI tool.
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CMOs — Learn From The NFL Missteps To Protect And Build Your Brand

Sheryl Pattek

I admit it; I’m a sports junkie. And, this is usually one of my favorite times of the year — the first few weeks of the NFL season. But this year, it’s been more about how poorly the NFL is managing what happens off the field than it is the excitement of what’s happening on the field of play.

Somehow the NFL has forgotten what its carefully built brand stands for. It's forgotten that every experience fans have with its brand — including players’ behavior — makes a difference. And it's lost touch with what matters to its customer base. 

With a serious case of misjudgment, the NFL missed the opportunity to have its brand set an example and agenda for the rest of the country to follow with a no-tolerance stand on domestic violence. Instead, the deplorable way it's handled the Ray Rice domestic violence incident as well as others that have since come to light has damaged the carefully crafted NFL brand image, reputation, and ultimately overall success of its $6 billion business. So what can CMOs learn from the NFL experience to avoid missteps and instead build a strong and resilient brand?

Read my new report “How To Build A Strong B2B Brand” (subscription required) to help you avoid the pitfalls the NFL fell into. Expanding on Tracy Stokes' work in our brand experience playbook, my new report applies Tracy’s work to the unique challenges B2B marketers face in building, growing, and managing customer-centric brand experiences. 

Read my report and learn how to:

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Digging For Interactive Entertainment With Minecraft

James McQuivey

Yesterday Microsoft announced it would acquire Mojang along with its massive Minecraft gaming franchise for $2.5 billion. By now we've all seen the coverage, including the gratuitous interviews with middle-schoolers about whether Microsoft is "cool" enough to own Minecraft. By and large, we think this is a good acquisition for Microsoft, and we said as much in our Quick Take, just published this afternoon, summarizing the acquisition, its benefits, and its challenges for Forrester clients. Go to the report to read the client-only details of our analysis: "Quick Take: Microsoft Mines Minecraft for the Future of Interactive Entertainment." As we explain in the report, there are specific challenges Microsoft will face that will determine whether this ends up being a sensible acquisition or a sensational one. 

Beyond the detailed analysis of the report, it's worth exploring the long-term question of what that sensational outcome would look like. The difference turns on the question of whether Microsoft is ready to invest in the future of digital interactive entertainment. This is a subtle point that has been missed in most analysis of the acquisition. Most people insist on covering the purchase as a gaming industry event. Microsoft, the owner of the Xbox, buys Minecraft, a huge gaming franchise. But that low-level analysis misses a bigger picture that I sincerely hope Microsoft is actively aware of.

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Accelerate Digital, Don't Try and Control It

Martin Gill

Centres of excellence and shared service teams are nothing new. Its a concept that Technology Management teams have been wrestling with for years, if not decades in an effort to streamline underlying technical architecture and simplify application landscapes. In the digital world, its a less well established approach, but one that is gaining momentum as an emerging set of best practices forms around how to organize and manage a global digital strategy.

Pete Blackshaw has led the charge over the last couple of years at Nestle, establishing a widely publicised Digital Acceleration Team. The team focuses on “listening, engaging, inspiring and transforming” across Nestle’s disparate and diverse markets and brands. Its not just an operational centre of excellence, it walks a fine line between dictating to local teams and being a paper tiger with no real influence. And it does so very effectively.

But why “acceleration team” and not “centre of excellence”.

I believe that the language is important. For a local team, the idea that a global “centre of excellence” is going to roll up and tell them what to do can be a very negative experience. Do the global team understand the nuances of my market? Will migrating our lean, agile eCommerce platform onto the behemoth enterprise platform slow us down?

“Acceleration” helps create a more positive and collaborative approach.  

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