Let's Talk Geography And Marketing Vehicles In The Tech Industry

Daniel Klein

Based on strong interest from my previous blogs on choosing the right marketing vehicles, I figured I'd continue the discussion with another angle that's often vexing for tech marketers - how do marketing vehicles vary by geography?

Cultural preferences factor significantly into how technology decision-makers consume information as they go through the purchase process. In analyzing more than 20,000 interviews across the US, Europe, and Asia Pacific, we see that vehicle selection varies by region by up to 40%. For tech marketers, this means that straightforward localization of global programs won’t work. Instead, you must understand how cultural preferences shape vehicle preferences and build programs that map to the specific vehicles appropriate for each market. Let’s look at a detailed example and then some broad guidelines.

We get a lot of questions about vehicle preferences for the C-suite, so I’ll pick CFOs as our example. Across the US, Europe, and Asia Pacific, the CFO is a critical player at the beginning and end of the purchase process for investments in collaboration and virtualization technology. When we take a look at vehicle preference for CFOs across these regions, we find that CFOs in the US prefer a balanced mix approach (vendor site, search, in-person sales discussion, and online business print such as Forbes and The Wall Street Journal). CFOs in Europe prefer web vehicles (online business print, online tech print, and online tech info sites) and CFOs in Asia Pacific favor events and sales over web vehicles. In all regions, the CFO is involved and tech-savvy. However, a marketer needs a unique regional mix to reach and influence the CFO.

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Choosing The Right Marketing Vehicles In The Tech Industry — Timing Matters

Daniel Klein

Today’s launch of Forrester Tech Marketing Navigator seemed like a good catalyst to dig a little deeper into my previous blog post about how many marketing vehicles are needed for a B2B tech solution (How Many Marketing Vehicles Do You Need? Guiding Principle Number Two.)  If you read that blog, you’ll recall that I identified that on average 7.6 marketing vehicles are used by IT or business professionals during a technology purchasing process (with considerably more than 30 available for marketers to use.) Note that you’ll need to use more than 7.6 marketing vehicles in your overall marketing mix because you’re likely need to influence various stakeholders whose use of marketing vehicles varies. This makes a tech marketer’s job challenging.

 

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Amdocs Agrees To Purchase Bridgewater Systems For $215 Million

Michele Pelino

Yesterday, Amdocs, a leading provider of customer experience systems, agreed to acquire Bridgewater Systems, a provider of policy, subscriber management, and network control solutions for mobile and convergent service providers, for US$215 million. The combined solution resulting from this acquisition will combine Amdocs’ existing BSS/OSS and customer experience solutions with network level information from Bridgewater’s solution. The integrated organization will provide service providers with an enhanced ability to monetize data services and to support complex pricing strategies across multiple devices, users, and networks. From a customer perspective, Amdocs and Bridgewater share some key service provider customers including Bell Mobility, Sprint, and Telstra. 

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Ericsson Enhances OSS Service Capabilities By Acquiring Telcordia

Michele Pelino

Ericsson made a $1.15 billion offer to acquire Telcordia, a provider of operations support systems/business support systems (OSS/BSS) for telecom service providers. The Telcordia acquisition enables Ericsson to establish a leading position providing service fulfillment, service assurance, network optimization, and real-time charging services to wireless and wireline operators worldwide. Ericsson will gain Telcordia’s 200+ customers in 55 countries, including AT&T and Verizon in North America. The acquisition will also augment Ericsson’s managed service capabilities, which are currently used by firms including Sprint and Telefonica Brazil.

BSS/OSS solution demand is increasing due to communication service provider requirements to deploy a variety of converged services and applications to customers across fixed and wireless networks in a seamless manner. Telcordia’s OSS software solutions, combined with Ericsson’s global position, marketing clout, and existing billing services will enable the combined organization to offer a more comprehensive range of BSS/OSS solutions. This acquisition will also change the competitive and fragmented BSS/OSS vendor landscape. Ericsson will be in a better position to compete against key BSS/OSS vendors, including Amdocs, Huawei, and Nokia Siemens Networks, as well as systems integrators, including Accenture, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard, that also offer BSS/OSS solutions.  

The Goldilocks Approach to Messaging: Guiding Principle Number Five

Daniel Klein

Much like in the story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears,” tech marketers must find the right balance between too many and too few messages. Common pitfalls include standardizing on a one-message-fits-all philosophy to having so many messages that sales and marketing are unable to deliver them to the right people, at the right time, and in the right context. That’s where Guiding Principle Number Five fits in.

Guiding Principle Number Five: Messaging 3x2

For almost all technology solutions, it’s necessary to have variances in messaging to reflect the different roles or titles, geographies, size companies, different industries, etc., that tech marketers are targeting. The good news for tech marketers is that Forrester Tech Marketing Navigator data shows that by focusing on the top three shared messages that are relevant across multiple segments and the two messages that are uniquely relevant to a specific segment/target, tech marketers can achieve the Goldilocks’ “just right” quotient for messaging.

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How Much Content Is Needed For Content Marketing?: Guiding Principle Number Four

Daniel Klein

Tech marketers constantly ask my team and me, “How much content is necessary in a content marketing plan? “ It’s a vexing question but one that can be answered with the fourth guiding principle.

Guiding Principle Number Four: Content 3x3

Buyers and influencers of high consideration B2B technology solutions typically use about three distinct content types during the awareness, the consideration, and the purchase phases of the buying process — a total of nine pieces. Before you go out and generate more content or start cutting down what you already have to hit this average, keep in mind two previous guiding principles that affect your content strategy. Guiding Principle Number One stated that you are likely to have a minimum of three to four key influencers for your solution. That means you’ll need to ensure that you’re applying the 3x3 to each buyer and influencer. Don’t panic though, it doesn’t mean you need to go out and create 27 to 36 different content pieces. Guiding Principle Number Three highlighted the 3:1:1 ratio, which means buyers and influencers typically find 70% of the content that they consume on their own. That doesn’t mean you can’t create content for them to find, but it means you don’t have to create all 27 to 36 pieces. Also, look for reuse or shared content between buyers and influencers.

 So the next time you are deciding on how much content to create, remember the 3x3 — it will serve you well.

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The Right Ratio For Your Content Marketing Strategy: Guiding Principle Number Three

Daniel Klein

If you’ve been reading this blog for the last two weeks, you know that we’ve covered the first two guiding principles for tech marketers: 1) Targeting and 2) Sources/Vehicles. Clearly, those are critical. Much like you’ve committed 911 to memory for emergencies and 411 to memory for directory assistance, tech marketers should memorize 3:1:1 for guiding their content strategy.

Guiding Principle Number Three: Content 3:1:1

3:1:1 is the simple but powerful ratio that should guide your content strategy. Buyers and influencers of high consideration solutions find 70% of the content they consume on their own during the buying process. 15% of the content that they consume is typically sent to them by marketers and the remaining 15% is delivered to them by sales (or an indirect sales channel).

The 70% of the content that they find on their own can take many forms. They find it via a search query, come across it while reading an online article, seek it out by coming to your website, etc. Because this percent is so great, you can’t possibly control everything they find, but you can still help them find the content. Leave “hooks” to your content in places your buyers and influencers are likely to be. Create “magnets” that draw buyers and influencers to content of your choosing.

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Themes From Management World 2011: Innovation And Collaboration Are Keys To Telecom Vendor And Service Provider Success

Michele Pelino

Last week I attended the TM Forum Management World 2011 conference, which was held for the first time in Dublin, Ireland.  Over 3,500 attendees including nearly 200 service providers participated in the event, the largest group ever to attend the conference, which is sponsored by the TM Forum, a global industry association focused on helping simplify the complexity of running a service provider’s business. For me, the highlights of the event were in the renewed positive energy and focus of the delegates, vendors, and service providers in identifying opportunities for communication service providers to innovate and collaborate in new ways in order to address emerging opportunities in the communications industry.

Keynote presentations during the forum highlighted the diverse perspectives from traditional telecom operators and new participants in the communications industry. For example, Kevin Peters, Chief Marketing Officer of AT&T Business Solutions highlighted the network as a critical asset that is global, efficient, and robust with the ability to connect billions of smartphone devices and the growing number of machine-to-machine (M2M) end points. These connected devices use the network to provide intelligence and insight into the status of objects, items, and people. Stephen Shurrock, Chief Executive Officer, Telefonica O2 Ireland, highlighted the ability to deliver a wide variety of new mobile applications and services.

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How Many Marketing Vehicles Do You Need? Guiding Principle Number Two

Daniel Klein

Last week I provided the first of five guiding principles for technology marketers, based on over 100,000 tech buyer interviews and countless client interactions. Now it’s time for the second guiding principle.

Guiding Principle Number Two: Marketing Vehicles

Forrester tracks the relative importance of 38 different marketing vehicles across awareness, consideration, and purchase (i.e., email, tradeshows, search, display ads, etc. I’ve included a picture of these 38 vehicles below.) It’s the tech marketer’s job, and a difficult one at that, to decide how many are actually necessary. That’s where the second guiding principle comes in: On average, 7.6 of these 38 marketing vehicles are used by a technology buyer/influencer. For example, an IT manager who is evaluating a new technology purchase will use between seven and eight different sources as he/she becomes aware of the solution, considers the solution, and makes/influences a purchase decision.   Similarly, a line-of-business professional involved in the same purchase will also use between seven and eight sources.  Since these two individuals are involved in the same purchasing decision, the sophisticated marketer should also look to determine which vehicles (sources) are shared, thus providing an opportunity for reuse and bridging the two influencers together.    

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Targeting - Guiding Principle Number One For Tech Marketers From 100,000 Customer Interviews

Daniel Klein

One of the reasons I enjoy working at Forrester is the unique opportunity to turn data into actionable insights that tech marketers can use to drive more revenue for their companies by increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of their marketing.  

Based on this data and our work with clients, five simple but powerful guiding principles have emerged around targeting, marketing vehicles, content strategy, and messaging that all tech marketers can apply. Over the next five weeks, I’ll be sharing them with you via this blog, one per week on Tuesday mornings, starting today.

Guiding Principle Number One: Targeting

 

We all know that high-consideration technology purchases at medium and large enterprises involve multiple stakeholders. However, all too often, marketers and/or sales associate a disproportionate amount of influence to one or two particular influencers; for example, the CIO or line of business (LOB) professional. The reality is that no one influencer has more than 30% of the total power through the purchase process. You must ensure that you are allocating your marketing programs proportionally across all of the appropriate influencers and that you don’t get fixated on simply engaging one or two influencers, thinking that they control all of the necessary power.

So, the next time you are deciding whom to target, remember the 30% rule — it will serve you well.

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