How Much Content Is Needed For Content Marketing?: Guiding Principle Number Four

Daniel Klein

Tech marketers constantly ask my team and me, “How much content is necessary in a content marketing plan? “ It’s a vexing question but one that can be answered with the fourth guiding principle.

Guiding Principle Number Four: Content 3x3

Buyers and influencers of high consideration B2B technology solutions typically use about three distinct content types during the awareness, the consideration, and the purchase phases of the buying process — a total of nine pieces. Before you go out and generate more content or start cutting down what you already have to hit this average, keep in mind two previous guiding principles that affect your content strategy. Guiding Principle Number One stated that you are likely to have a minimum of three to four key influencers for your solution. That means you’ll need to ensure that you’re applying the 3x3 to each buyer and influencer. Don’t panic though, it doesn’t mean you need to go out and create 27 to 36 different content pieces. Guiding Principle Number Three highlighted the 3:1:1 ratio, which means buyers and influencers typically find 70% of the content that they consume on their own. That doesn’t mean you can’t create content for them to find, but it means you don’t have to create all 27 to 36 pieces. Also, look for reuse or shared content between buyers and influencers.

 So the next time you are deciding on how much content to create, remember the 3x3 — it will serve you well.

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The Right Ratio For Your Content Marketing Strategy: Guiding Principle Number Three

Daniel Klein

If you’ve been reading this blog for the last two weeks, you know that we’ve covered the first two guiding principles for tech marketers: 1) Targeting and 2) Sources/Vehicles. Clearly, those are critical. Much like you’ve committed 911 to memory for emergencies and 411 to memory for directory assistance, tech marketers should memorize 3:1:1 for guiding their content strategy.

Guiding Principle Number Three: Content 3:1:1

3:1:1 is the simple but powerful ratio that should guide your content strategy. Buyers and influencers of high consideration solutions find 70% of the content they consume on their own during the buying process. 15% of the content that they consume is typically sent to them by marketers and the remaining 15% is delivered to them by sales (or an indirect sales channel).

The 70% of the content that they find on their own can take many forms. They find it via a search query, come across it while reading an online article, seek it out by coming to your website, etc. Because this percent is so great, you can’t possibly control everything they find, but you can still help them find the content. Leave “hooks” to your content in places your buyers and influencers are likely to be. Create “magnets” that draw buyers and influencers to content of your choosing.

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How Many Marketing Vehicles Do You Need? Guiding Principle Number Two

Daniel Klein

Last week I provided the first of five guiding principles for technology marketers, based on over 100,000 tech buyer interviews and countless client interactions. Now it’s time for the second guiding principle.

Guiding Principle Number Two: Marketing Vehicles

Forrester tracks the relative importance of 38 different marketing vehicles across awareness, consideration, and purchase (i.e., email, tradeshows, search, display ads, etc. I’ve included a picture of these 38 vehicles below.) It’s the tech marketer’s job, and a difficult one at that, to decide how many are actually necessary. That’s where the second guiding principle comes in: On average, 7.6 of these 38 marketing vehicles are used by a technology buyer/influencer. For example, an IT manager who is evaluating a new technology purchase will use between seven and eight different sources as he/she becomes aware of the solution, considers the solution, and makes/influences a purchase decision.   Similarly, a line-of-business professional involved in the same purchase will also use between seven and eight sources.  Since these two individuals are involved in the same purchasing decision, the sophisticated marketer should also look to determine which vehicles (sources) are shared, thus providing an opportunity for reuse and bridging the two influencers together.    

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Targeting - Guiding Principle Number One For Tech Marketers From 100,000 Customer Interviews

Daniel Klein

One of the reasons I enjoy working at Forrester is the unique opportunity to turn data into actionable insights that tech marketers can use to drive more revenue for their companies by increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of their marketing.  

Based on this data and our work with clients, five simple but powerful guiding principles have emerged around targeting, marketing vehicles, content strategy, and messaging that all tech marketers can apply. Over the next five weeks, I’ll be sharing them with you via this blog, one per week on Tuesday mornings, starting today.

Guiding Principle Number One: Targeting

 

We all know that high-consideration technology purchases at medium and large enterprises involve multiple stakeholders. However, all too often, marketers and/or sales associate a disproportionate amount of influence to one or two particular influencers; for example, the CIO or line of business (LOB) professional. The reality is that no one influencer has more than 30% of the total power through the purchase process. You must ensure that you are allocating your marketing programs proportionally across all of the appropriate influencers and that you don’t get fixated on simply engaging one or two influencers, thinking that they control all of the necessary power.

So, the next time you are deciding whom to target, remember the 30% rule — it will serve you well.

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My Three Takeaways From Intel CMO’s Keynote At Forrester Marketing Forum

Daniel Klein

At Forrester’s recent Marketing Forum in San Francisco, it was my pleasure to introduce Deborah Conrad, Intel VP and CMO, ahead of her keynote. Deborah shared her experiences about transforming the 20-year-old PC-oriented Intel “Inside” brand into the Intel “Every-Ware” brand, which is relevant in a world with a proliferation of devices and consumers of technology.

As I listened to her keynote before joining her back onstage for Q/A, she shared many great examples, stories, and lessons. However, three important insights left a lasting impression in my mind and are relevant for all technology marketers, regardless of company size, technology category, or marketing budget.

1. It’s about the experience. Intel realized that it was no longer about what the chip does but about the experience it creates for the user. This is an important lesson for all technology marketers, who, as a collective industry, have historically marketed technology innovation or the latest and greatest features and functions, not the experience generated by the technology or solution. We can borrow a page from our colleagues in B2C marketing — such as BMW marketing “The Ultimate Driving Machine” and the experience associated with it, not marketing horsepower, torque, and braking distances.

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A New Resource For Answers To Marketers' And Product Managers' Top Issues

Daniel Klein

I'm excited to introduce a new way for marketers and product managers to get answers to their most pressing issues and challenges.  Forrester has launched an online community for technology marketers and product managers as the premier destination for leaders to exchange ideas, opinions, and real-world solutions with each other. Forrester analysts will also be part of the community, helping facilitate the discussions and sharing their views.

The community is open to all technology marketers and product managers. 

Here’s what you’ll find:

  • A simple platform on which you can pose your questions and get advice from peers who face the same business or technology challenges.
  • Insight from our analysts, who weigh in frequently on the issues and point to relevant research. 
  • Fresh perspective from peers, who share their real-world success stories, best practices, and templates.
  • Content on the latest technologies and trends affecting your business — from Forrester and other thought leaders.

 

I encourage you to become part of the community:

  • Ask a question about a business or technology problem.
  • Start a discussion on an emerging trend that’s having an impact on your work.
  • Contribute to an existing discussion thread from a community member.
  • Share templates with your peers for common artifacts like social media guidelines or campaign outlines.
  • Suggest topics for upcoming Forrester research reports.
  • Create a community profile.
  • Share your perspective with others.

 

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Insights From A Panel Of B2B Marketing Powerhouses That Convened Last Week At Forrester’s Marketing Forum

Daniel Klein

Last week at Forrester’s Marketing Forum, I had the pleasure of sitting three rows back from a panel discussion comprised of a who’s who of B2B marketing executives: Chris Bradshaw, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Autodesk; James K. Cornell, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Prudential Retirement; Deborah Nelson, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Enterprise Business, Hewlett-Packard; Marjorie Tenzer, Vice President, Marketing & Communications, IBM Americas, IBM.  The panel was moderated by Forrester’s own Peter Burris, Principal Analyst and Research Director. 

Here’s 45 minutes of discussion distilled into four key takeaways:

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Forrester buys JupiterResearch

Cliff Condon

Joshbernoff_cliffcondon_4 by Josh Bernoff and Cliff Condon

If there is one other research company that we've continued to encounter, respect, and see as real competition in the interactive media space, it is JupiterResearch. While the company ownership has changed hands several times over the years, the analysts have continued to do great work.

That's why we're very pleased that Forrester Research today announced it is acquiring JupiterResearch.

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