NFC Adoption Becomes Much Simpler: Google Opens Android 4.4 KitKat So That The NFC Can Be Provisioned By Anyone

Andras Cser

This is big: Google opened up Android 4.4 KitKat to allow access to the NFC chip to Android apps and not just the trusted execution environment on the secure element.

What it means: any issuer, developer, 3rd party, current 3D Secure vendor, Payment Services Provider, etc. can create a mobile wallet application that can present credit card information to the NFC and allow the user to use the card information for payment. This might mean that traditional trusted service managers (companies that are authorized to provision the secure element on the mobile phone, like Gemalto, FirstData, CorTSM, etc.) may face fierce competition from really anyone who wishes to provision cards to the phone. Mobile network operators can now be easily cut from the payment chain, too.

Kicking Off Forrester's "Targeted Attack Hierarchy Of Needs" Research

Rick Holland

I am about to kick off my next Forrester research on targeted attacks.  Here is the short abstract: "The threat landscape has evolved but organizations haven't. Leveraging concepts of Zero Trust, this report will detail strategies for protecting against targeted attacks against your organization. We will focus on the pros and cons of various strategies and provide suggestions for maximizing your investments." If you'd like a preview to the tone of this research please see one of my previous blogs: "Kim Kardashian and APTs."

  • Vendors:  The focus of this research is on overall strategy and NOT on specific vendor capabilities. We look forward to detailed vendor conversations when we do follow on Waves or Market Overviews in the future. 
  • Enterprises:  If you would like to provide us feedback on your experience with defending against targeted attacks, we would love to hear from you.  If you purchased a magic anti-APT box and it is/isn't living up to your expectations, let us know.  We are currently scheduling research interviews.  Research interviews are open to more than just Forrester clients.  If you aren't a client and would like to participate, we will provide you a complimentary copy of the final research upon completion. 
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Fairy Tales As A Boardroom Strategy

Andrew Rose

Communication is an essential part of the CISO's role, but too often we get it horribly wrong. That was the message laid out by communications expert David Porter at the RSA Conference in Europe recently.

We know that a large part of the CISO’s role is to influence, cajole and encourage our business leaders to make the right choices, enabling our firms to manage risk and move forward safely. Creating compelling communications is a differentiator, but too few CISOs excel in this area and this is holding back their credibility, their career and the risk posture of their employers.

David Porter proposed spending a great deal more time than most of us would be used to, refining the introduction to any piece of communication, and actively crafting it to flow from ‘Situation’  (“Once upon a time there was a beautiful princess..”) to ‘Complication’ (“..who was imprisoned in a tall tower by her wicked step-mother”). That sounds pretty standard, but it was interesting how David then analysed different RSAC submissions and showed how even the professionally written ones deviated from this model, and how much clearer they were once the rule had been applied.

This simple setup opens up the readers/listener's mind and plants questions that seek to understand how the story can be resolved, and stories are powerful communication tools.

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If Everything Is Threat Intelligence, Then Nothing Is Threat Intelligence

Rick Holland

The hype surrounding threat intelligence has continued to build since I wrote the blog "My Threat Intel Can Beat Up Your Threat Intel” in mid-2012.  S&R pros are responding to both the hope and promise of threat intelligence. According to our Forrsights survey data, 75% of security decision-makers report that establishing or improving threat intelligence capabilities is a top priority for their organization.   

One of the most significant challenges in leveraging threat intelligence is operationalizing it. Today, there are two broad categories of organizations that leverage threat intelligence. I’ll use an analogy to describe them. The US television show “Sons of Anarchy” follows the lives of an outlaw motorcycle club. The Sons of Anarchy refer to themselves as “1%ers”: They have the power, resources, and means to accomplish anything they desire. This is in contrast with the 99% who are merely motorcycle enthusiasts without these capabilities.  Some of these early adopters include financial services, technology, and manufacturing companies. 

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Why You Should NOT Build Your Own Authentication Framework And Solution In-House. See OWASP A2.

Andras Cser

We regularly get the question: should we build our web authentication and single sign-on solution?

Here's why you should not do it: OWASP 2013 lists "Broken Authentication and Session Management" as the No.2 item to pay attention to when you design your web site. OWASP.org says:

"Application functions related to authentication and session management are often not implemented correctly, allowing attackers to compromise passwords, keys, or session tokens, or to exploit other implementation flaws to assume other users’ identities."

Implementing your own session and key management, validation, update, periodic rollover, etc. mechanisms in a scalable and fault tolerant way is extremely difficult. We regularly get inquiries from clients who want to replace their own in-house built web single sign-on framework -- mostly because they have been hacked or it's too expensive to operate and update.

This is why we see open source and commercial Web Access Management packages and solutions critically important to protect your web assets. Since they are mostly mature technologies, they protect against not just authentication and session management problems but often against cross site scripting and other older threats as well. If you use a newer product or a pure federation product, make sure that the vendor or supplier can help you answer your questions based on the the OWASP list.

Check out https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Top_10_2013-Top_10 for more details on the OWASP Top 10 for 2013.

 

 

Forrester expects a wave of acquisitions of cloud IAM providers

Andras Cser

With 1) SalesForce and other large SaaS vendors announcing grandiose plans for cloud IAM, not just for access control but also provisioning and 2) long-standing IAM 'arms suppliers' extending into the cloud (CA CloudMinder, SailPoint) we are already seeing pureplay cloud IAM players (Okta, OneLogin, Ping, etc.) starting to scratch their heads as to how to deal with the pressure. 

 

Forrester expects that we will see the following in the next 12-18 months:

1) Wave of acquisitions of cloud IAM providers. Those IAM vendors (SAP, Oracle, NetIQ, Quest, McAfee, RSA and even Symantec and Cisco etc.) that have not yet built an IAM framework or don't have on-premise IAM products they could turn into a cloud service will probably want to get into the game sooner rather than later. This will start a wave of acquisitions of cloud IAM providers. Now is the time to acquire and to get acquired in the cloud IAM space.

2) Moving of user stores into the cloud. We predicted this in 2012, but it's becoming a reality now. It is increasingly clear that on premise user directories (AD, LDAP, etc.) are starting to be only used for basic services and there is a great need for cloud based directories to support an increasing number of SaaS applications. Cloud IAM vendors we talk to (UnboundID and Okta) have announced plans to help customers with this migration.  SalesForce.com OEM agreement with ForgeRock to create SalesForce Identity Connect is the first step in this direction. Identity bridges or connectors which connect on-premise user stores to the cloud provider’s user store will play a critical role and be the hardest first step in this transition.  

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Kicking off the Forrester Web Content Security Wave

Rick Holland

We are about to kickoff our next Forrester Wave on web content security.  The inclusion criteria for vendor prequalification will be sent out within the next two weeks. We will be focusing on both traditional web gateways as well as the hybrid and SaaS delivery models. What does this mean for you?

  • Vendors:  If you feel that your solution applies to this Wave, please contact us and let us know that you'd like to be sent the prequalification survey.  We will be limiting the number of vendors participating in this evaluation. 
  • Enterprises:  If you would like to provide us feedback on your experience with web content security solutions and vendors, we would love to hear from you.  We plan to leverage your feedback for evaluation criteria as well as score weighting.  

Please contact Kelley Mak (kmak at forrester.com) if you are interested in participating.   We expect this Wave will publish in the Spring of 2014. (Fine print: This is a publication estimate and this date is subject to change.) 

Insights From McAfee Focus

Stephanie Balaouras

Last week, I and several analyst from Forrester’s Security & Risk team, including Chris McClean, John Kindervag, Tyler Shields, Heidi Shey, and Chris Sherman, attended McAfee’s annual Focus conference in Las Vegas.

I attend numerous security and IT conferences each year, most of which simply blur together into a vendor cacophony about the perils of social, cloud, and mobile device adoption or the ever present danger from devious cybercriminals and nefarious state-sponsored agents. The uniform repetition of this narrative from every vendor in the industry reminds me of the drowning din of thousands of cicadas awakening from hibernation. McAfee Focus had a different feel. And overall, compared to other conferences, it was a worthwhile trip, and not just because Chris McClean and I won at craps, but because while McAfee did pay homage to the technical security pros in the audience with the requisite discussion of the changing threat landscape and accompanying hacking demo, there was a palpable difference in their narrative, particularly in CEO Mike DeCesare’s keynote. Here are a few notable highlights from the conference:

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Technology Use By MSSPs -Check Out Our Survey

Edward Ferrara

Technology is essential in any managed security operations center. Technology has come a long way to create an active defense of the enterprise. There are vendors that offer solutions for log management, web application defense, firewall, incident event correlation, and many others. In order to understand the size of the security technology market, Forrester and the MSP Alliance are partnering in a survey to look at the managed security functions and the technology MSSPs use to deliver their services. If you are an MSSP or an end user of these technologies, you can complete this survey at:

FORRESTER - MSP ALLIANCE SURVEY

For completing the survey you are automatically entered into a contest to win an iPad mini. Also for completing the survey you will receive a complimentary copy of the resulting research paper.

Cloud And Cloud Security – Get Rid Of The Box

Edward Ferrara

Peter Kujawa CEO of Locknet, Steve Tallent from Fortinet, and I were speaking at the recent MSPWorld Conference in San Jose, California about the cloud revolution. Steve was interested in the conversation because Fortinet is now offering virtualized versions of their Fortigate UTM solution. Peter was interested because his business is built on taking the pain away that platform management entails. Obviously security intersects both of these worlds.

We discussed the changes cloud computing was making to the MSP/MSSP markets and the differences between the SMB and enterprise businesses and what motivates them to consider the cloud IaaS, SaaS, and PaaS model.

Peter talked about one of his clients – a smaller client – that managed their business from a small server stashed in the closet of their offices. Peter’s company offered to replace the box with a cloud-based system that took over patching, updates, and maintenance for the system for a simple monthly fee. The client would access their applications via the Internet.  The risk to this business was huge for so many reasons. The customer leapt at the chance to get rid of the box.

In another case, I was speaking with a large client and we talked about the motivation for the cloud. Inasmuch as maintenance and support are an issue, the larger issues for large companies are the IT assets on the balance sheet. This company liked cloud because of their need to “clean up” the balance sheet. There were too many IT assets loading down the balance sheet – distorting the company's return on assets.

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