Analyst Spotlight Podcast With Tyler Shields

Stephanie Balaouras

Introducing The New S&R Monthly Podcast!

The Forrester S&R team has doubled in size during the last several years. Today, we're 17 analysts and researchers across the US, Europe, and India, 19 if you count the research associates that support every project. Given the size of the team and the degree to which analysts have been able to specialize, we decided that we'd take a little time each month to highlight each member of the team in one of our bi-monthly newsletters and in a short podcast. If you're not signed up for our newsletters, I highly encourage you to do so, please email srfl@forrester.com for additional details. In the meantime, click below to listen to our analyst spotlight on Senior Analyst, Tyler Shields.

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IBM Doubles Down Cloud IAM And Acquires Lighthouse Gateway

Andras Cser

On the heels of the CrossIdeas acquisition (about which we have recently published a QuickTake), IBM today acquired another IAM cloud provider, Lighthouse Security Group. Its product and service, Lighhouse Gateway, is a small cloud provider that appeared in our Cloud IAM Wave and we were impressed by the "slickness" and ease-of-use of its customer interface for administration (policy management) and also for end users (Lighthouse Gateway provides its own front-end to ISIM and ISAM).

 

Now we recommend that IAM security and risk professionals should ask IBM the following questions about the acquisition:

1) How will IBM offer Lighthouse Gateway? Will it be an add-on to ISIM and ISAM licenses or will it be a standalone offering or both?

2) How will IBM integrate the beautiful user interface of Lighthouse Gateway into ISIM and ISAM on-premises offerings?

3) How will the new IBM IAM access governance ecosystem of ISIM+CrossIdeas be merged with Lighthouse Gateway?

Forrester’s 2014 Data Privacy Heat Map Highlights Rampant Government Surveillance And Increased Regulation Around The Globe

Christopher Sherman

Corporations spend a lot of time and money to ensure their employee- and customer-facing technologies are compliant with all local and regional data privacy laws. However, this task is made challenging by the patchwork of data privacy legislation around the world, with countries ranging from holding no restrictions on the use of personal data to countries with highly restrictive frameworks. To help our clients address these challenges, Forrester developed a research and planning tool called the Data Privacy Heat Map (try the demo version here). Originally published in 2010, the tool leverages in-depth analyses of the privacy-related laws and cultures of 54 countries around the world, helping our clients better strategize their own global privacy and data protection approaches. 

 

              
 

The most recent update to the tool, which published today, highlights two opposing trends affecting data privacy over the past 12 months:

  • Increased government surveillance continues to impede the free flow of information. Corporations worry that storing or processing data within the borders of a country with high levels of governmental surveillance could place their intellectual property at risk. Notable additions to the tool's growing list of countries with lowered barriers to government surveillance include the US, Germany, and the UK.
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The Militarization Of Information Security

Rick Holland

Does something like this sound familiar? "We need to find, fix, finish, exploit, analyze, & disseminate this intrusion set along the kill chain via force multipliers so we can observe, orient, decide, and act according to tactical, operational, and strategic priority intelligence requirements." I bet that part of it does. 

These days it seems that we cannot escape military concepts making their way into information security strategy. Firms are attempting to implement the kill chain, and vendor-marketing headlines these concepts. I've contributed to it as well. See: "Force Multipliers - What Security & Risk Professionals Can Learn From Special Forces.

I think that it is important to keep in mind that we aren't the military and don't have the resources of the military. While military concepts can be useful, buzzwords won't secure your environment; you could become distracted and utilize your limited resources in the wrong manner. As I was sorting out my Black Hat calendar tonight, I fortuitously saw a talk that is very applicable to this topic: "The Library of Sparta," with David Raymond, Greg Conti, and Tom Cross. Here is part of their abstract: 

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Say “Small Footprint” Again. I Dare You, I Double Dare You.

Rick Holland

During the past 18 months or so, we have seen the emergence of innovative endpoint security solutions. The list is long; it is hard to keep track of all the solutions in the space. In no particular order, here is a sampling:  Bromium, Invincea, IBM Trusteer, Cylance, Palo Alto Networks Next-Gen Endpoint Protection (Cyvera), Microsoft Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET), Bit9 + Carbon Black, Confer, CounterTack Sentinel, Cybereason, CrowdStrike Falcon Host, Guidance Software Cybersecurity, Hexis HawkEye G, FireEye HX, Triumfant, Tanium, and Verdasys Digital Guardian. 

I take many briefings from these types of vendors (primarily the ones I cover in Forrester’s Endpoint Visibility and Control category) and within the first 5 minutes of the conversation, the vendor mentions that their solution has a “small footprint.”  The use of this phrase is the equivalent of nails scratching their way across a chalkboard for me. When was the last time you heard anyone say that they have a “large footprint?” Please provide more information: Do you run in user or kernel land? What are the impacts to utilization? Even if a vendor truly has a “small footprint,” when that new agent is deployed to a host that already has four or five agents running, the collective footprint is far from small.

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Protect Your Brand Today Through Comprehensive Risk Intelligence

Nick Hayes

We all know that securing your perimeter and your internal assets only gets you so far today. The crux of the issue is that your brand, and potential threats to it, are now often external and out of your direct area of control. The number of places and channels online where your brand appears and where malicious actors discuss how to take down your organization is expanding rapidly today.

Websites, media outlets, search engines, marketplaces, social networks, forums, mobile apps, online ads, and more – these are all places where your brands, products, workers, and affiliates and other associated third parties can be mentioned in inappropriate or malevolent contexts: They increase opportunities for brand defamation and data leakage; they act as discreet places to conspire or collude; they open the door to new security vulnerabilities; they decrease your control over your products; and they make it harder to spot contract violations and breaches.

 

The good news is: You’re not powerless either.

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got STIX?

Rick Holland
The sharing of threat intelligence is a hot topic these days. When I do conference speeches, I typically ask how many organizations see value in sharing, and most in the room will raise their hand.  Next, I ask how many organizations are actually sharing threat intelligence, and roughly 25% to 30% in the room raises their hand. When our 2014 Security Survey data comes in, I will have some empirical data to quote, but anecdotally, there seems to be more interest than action when it comes to sharing. I wrote about some of the challenges around sharing in “Four Best Practices To Maximize The Value Of Using And Sharing Threat Intelligence.” Trust is at the epicenter of sharing and just like in "Meet the Parents," you have to be in the circle of trust. You can enable sharing, but automating trust does take time. 
 
 
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Are You Down With CIP (Critical Infrastructure Protection)?

Rick Holland

I am kicking off a new research series on critical infrastructure protection.  This first report is titled: “Brief: S&R Pros Can No Longer Ignore Threats To Critical Infrastructure.”  

Critical infrastructure is frequently on my mind, especially the ICS/SCADA within the energy sector. I live in Texas; oil and natural gas are big here ya'll. I'm just a short distance away from multiple natural gas drilling sites.  I cannot help but think about the risks during the extraction and transport of this natural gas.  North Texas has seen an attempt to bomb the natural gas infrastructure. In 2012, Anson Chi attempted to destroy an Atmos Energy pipeline in Plano, Texas. As a security and risk professional, I wonder about the potential cyber impacts an adversary with Chi's motivations could have.

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Upcoming Research -- Brief: US Department Of Homeland Security (DHS) Provides Funding For Cybersecurity Innovation

Edward Ferrara

The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) plans to sponsor important research in cybersecurity over the next three to five years through the Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) process.  The US Federal government’s participation in cybersecurity is one of false starts. Members of each of the branches of government have made statements on the need for improved cybersecurity but very little has been done, at least in any public sense, to help the private sector deal with an onslaught of cyberattacks. At the same time, the National Security Agency (NSA) has been actively spying on private sector companies and their customers. This has sent mixed messages.

Encouragingly, the DHS is now making money available to fund research in cybersecurity with the goal of solving some of the toughest cybersecurity issues. The amount of money is small compared to the enormity of the cybersecurity problem, but it is a step in the right direction. This report will focus on what the money funds and what it means to commercial enterprises and their customers. Look for this report to publish in early August.

Mobile Application Security - The Fight Results

Tyler Shields

A few months ago I posted a blog entry entitled: "Containerization vs. Application Wrapping: The Tale Of The Tape." Well... the bout is finally over and a winner has been decided. Using a virtual tape measure, I analyzed the mobile application technology spectrum to determine which technologies are better suited to deployment in the enterprise and why. The results were about what I expected. The fight went right down to the wire and nobody scored a knockout with the winner being decided with a slim margin over the 8 rounds. Here is the judge's score card:

You can read all about the data behind the analysis and the justification for the results in my latest report: "In The Mobile Security Bout Of the Year, App Wrapping Beats Containerization On Points."