Asian Firms Are Gearing Up To Address Age Of The Customer Security Risks

Digitally empowered customers are disrupting every industry; the age of the customer brings with it some inherent risks that will push organizations to increase spending on security software. In Asia Pacific, security software has leapfrogged other software categories and leads the region in terms of expected software spending growth in 2014 (see figure below).

We believe that the high growth in security software spending in Asia Pacific is primarily due to the following risks related to the age of the customer:

  • Migration to public cloud services. In a recent survey, 41% of Asia Pacific firms identified public cloud and other as-a-service offerings as a high or critical priority for 2014. Increased adoption of public cloud-based services like storage and disaster recovery is stretching the attack surface, exposing enterprises to a variety of security issues related to confidentiality, integrity, availability, and accountability. In response, firms must strengthen their security infrastructure.
  • Increased mobility. Nearly 45% of the Asian organizations in our survey identified mobility as a high or critical priority for 2014.  As enterprises introduce mobility into their environment and add devices to support the initiative, the footprint of their infrastructure increases. The new access points attached to the network create opportunities for attackers to break into the infrastructure directly or via mobile application portals that provide gateways to protected, sensitive data.
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"Privacy" And "Business Differentiator" Must Get Cozier. Why And How?

Eve Maler

Data Privacy Day is on January 28. But isn't all hope lost when it comes to the P-word? Interestingly, Daniel Solove is one key expert who doesn't think so: His recent Year in Privacy roundup sounds a number of positive notes, largely having to do with regulatory pressure driven by public pressure. In the age of the customer, we really can see "water wear away stone" when ordinary people demand change.  

My colleague Fatemeh Khatibloo recently published some must-read research on contextual privacy: a framework for negotiating the collection and use of personal data that ensures a fair value exchange for both the customer and the business. Don't miss the blog post where she lays out some takeaways:

  • Privacy isn't dead, it just needs redefining.
  • Privacy will be a market differentiator.
  • Privacy technology will disrupt the marketing ecosystem.
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Privacy Activists Are Cheering For The NSA Ruling, But It Won't Be A Lasting Victory

Renee Murphy

Privacy is on trial in the United States. Legal activist Larry Klayman asked US District Judge Richard J. Leon to require the NSA to stop collecting phone data and immediately delete the data it already has. His argument was that US citizens have a right to privacy and this is a violation of the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution protecting citizens from illegal search and seizure. Monday's ruling that this practice is unconstitutional has privacy activists cheering in the streets, but it will not be a lasting victory.  

In the United States, there is not a single privacy law on the books. (You can argue that HIPAA is a privacy law, but nuances exist that can lessen its impact.) What is protected has come from judgments based on the application of the Fourth Amendment regarding search and seizure. US citizens were given "privileges,” thanks to Richard Nixon, which say we have an expectation of privacy when using a phone, which basically means that the government has to get a warrant for a wiretap. (It’s worth noting that in the UK, they don’t get that privilege.)

Data is up for grabs. And everyone is grabbing.

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And They're Off . . . The Mobile Security Dog Race Has Begun!

Tyler Shields

There is a 14-dog race going on, with a goal to win the wallets of the enterprise for mobile security spend. When lined up in the starting blocks, the racers may all seem to have equal chances, but a few are better poised to cross the finish line first and bask in the glory of the winners' circle. Three of these technologies are the odds-on favorites to lead from start to finish, with the rest of the racers struggling to remain relevant.

Coming off the starting block with the "holeshot" are the mobile device management vendors. With huge engines of revenue, large customer counts, and first-mover advantage, this dog is the odds-on favorite to take the championship trophy. Mobile device management vendors are already expanding their technologies and products into security platforms to diversify their rapidly commoditized product offerings. The move is paying off for the biggest and toughest MDM participants in the race, giving them the early, and potentially insurmountable, lead.
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You Can’t Outsource Accountability

Needless to say, Indian service providers pioneered and developed the outsourced software development space; currently, they generate a combined $3.2 billion of revenue annually. Although Indian software service providers claim high standards, it is apparent that there are still weaknesses in their delivery. I just published a report that highlights the main culprits for this: a lack of executive commitment, poor application coding, and the industrialization of software development:

  • Poor application coding persists despite lessons learned. The security vulnerabilities are hardly obscure: More than two-thirds of applications have cross-site scripting vulnerabilities, nearly half fail to validate input strings thoroughly, and nearly one-third can fall foul of SQL injection. Security professionals and software engineers have known about these types of flaws for years, but they continue to show up repeatedly in new software code.
  • A lack of executive commitment within outsourcing firms leads to poor security. Although most of the service firms’ executive leadership teams mean well, few appear to grasp the true potential for security breaches at their customers, the implications of those breaches, and the part that the outsourced partner must play in preventing them.
  • The industrialization of software development expands the attack surface. Development on an industrial scale can put clients at significant risk. In some cases, offshore development centers serve multiple clients but lack effective network segmentation.
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Application Security Wave Prequalification Announcement

Tyler Shields

Image Courtesy of VladStudio http://vladstudio.deviantart.com/We are about to kickoff a Forrester Wave on Application Security Testing. The focus of this Wave is on both static application security testing (SAST) as well as dynamic application security testing (DAST) offerings. This Wave will cover both tools and SaaS based delivery methods. What does this mean for you?

  • Vendors:  If you feel that your solution applies to this Wave, please contact us and let us know that you'd like to be sent the prequalification survey.  We will be limiting the number of vendors participating in this evaluation. 
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Asia Pacific Governments Must Learn From Recent Cyberattacks

The digital age brings some inherent security risks, like cyberattacks and hacking, that can have a significant impact on governments. The governments of Singapore, Philippines, South Korea, India, and Japan are some of the recent major victims — and the list is growing by the day.

Why are Asia Pacific (AP) governments a soft target for cyberattacks?

  • Aging, vulnerable infrastructure. Many servers that host critical government websites still run outmoded operating systems and are plagued by problems such as obsolete software and insecure coding, making them vulnerable to cyberattacks. For instance, only a handful of government computers in India use the latest version of Java; more than three-quarters of them are running unsupported versions of the software, which has been a common target for malware since 2010.
  • Low adoption of advanced security technology coupled with lack of security expertise. Governments still rely on conventional security controls like antivirus, antimalware, and firewalls that are powerless against sophisticated attacks. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that governments lack highly skilled personnel to combat cyberattacks effectively.
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Centrify Cloud SSO marks the beginning of mobile device manufacturers getting into the IAM space

Andras Cser

Centrify's new Cloud SSO portal is much like the competition: Okta, OneLogin, Ping, Symplified, SecureAuth, i.e. the ones that we looked at in our Cloud IAM Wave. 

What's really interesting about this offering is that Samsung KNOX OEMs the client side mobile application for SSO for its high-end devices. Forrester predicts that Apple (with its consumer fingerprint reader already making inroads into authentication) and others (Windows Phone, etc.) will follow suit and offer cloud based IAM and SSO services.

Still On Windows XP? Time To Review Your Options

Christopher Sherman
Does your organization still have a significant number of endpoints still running Windows XP? Don’t worry, you’re not alone: Forrester's Forrsights Hardware Survey, Q3 2013 shows that the average organization still has 20% of their employee endpoints running XP. Considering that most organizations spend 18 to 32 months when migrating to newer versions of Windows, many organizations will likely find themselves scrambling to batten down the hatches before Microsoft’s April 8, 2014 end-of-life deadline.
 
After this date, Microsoft will stop releasing security patches for the 13-year-old operating system, a terrifying situation for organizations still relying on XP. What can you do as an organization if you still have a substantial XP presence within your environment? You can:
 
  • Migrate to Windows 7 or 8 posthaste. Microsoft has come a long way in preventing certain classes of attacks, such as bootkit and rootkit attacks. In fact, Microsoft has told us that Windows XP is 21 times more likely to get infected with malware than Windows 8.1. To help our clients understand the pros and cons of Windows 8.1 security, I recently published a guide on this very topic.
  • Buy some extra time. For those that can afford it, Microsoft will offer “custom support” in the form of XP security patches past the April 8 deadline. I’ve spoken with a number of organizations that determined that it would be cheaper to pay this premium than to migrate away from XP. Of course, this is just prolonging the inevitable; custom support will not be available forever.
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LG Is Learning An Embarrassing Privacy Lesson In The Age Of The Customer

Rick Holland

In a recent report titled “Technology Management In The Age Of The Customer,” Forrester defines the Age of the Customer as: "A 20-year business cycle in which the most successful enterprises will reinvent themselves to systematically understand and serve increasingly powerful customers."  In this Age of the Customer, empowered consumers using social media can have tremendous influence.  Technology gives the lone voice a platform to be heard across the Internet. Technology is the force multiplier for empowered consumers.  

Jason Huntley, a UK-based IT consultant, is a perfect example of one of these increasingly powerful customers. He posted a blog titled “LG Smart TVs logging USB filenames and viewing info to LG servers.” In it Jason detailed how his Smart LG TV was spying on him.  The TV was not only reporting data about viewing habits, but was also uploading the filenames from the storage devices he attached to the TV.  His viewing habits data was collected despite the fact that he had opted out of the “Collection of watching info.”  Jason wrote, “This information appears to be sent back unencrypted and in the clear to LG every time you change channel, even if you have gone to the trouble of changing the setting above to switch collection of viewing information off.”  He had a false expectation of privacy. See below: 

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