Forrester's Customer Experience Index For China, 2014

For the past seven years, Forrester has reported on how consumers rate their experiences with major brands in the US by publishing our annual report, the Customer Experience Index (CXi). The CXi has helped us identify customer experience leaders and helped many top brands in the US benchmark their customer experience against their peers.

This year for the first time, we’re bringing this study to China in order to help us understand the quality of the customer experience in this market. In fewer than two weeks, I’ll be revealing the CXi results for China in Shanghai at Forrester’s Summit For Marketing & Strategy Professionals: China

  

During my track session, I will:

  • Share the interesting and surprising findings in this year’s CXi results for China.
  • Talk about what some leading companies are doing to enhance their customer experience in China.
  • Give you actionable advice on how to improve your customer experience maturity.

The event will also provide a good opportunity for me to hear you out. I am eager to learn about your pain points relating to customer experience in this market.

I look forward to seeing you in Shanghai! 上海见!

Chinese Consumers Have Unique Expectations Of Your Website

If you think that translating your website into Chinese will fully serve your Chinese customers’ needs, you’re wrong. In fact, there’s no guarantee that translated content will even meet your Chinese customers’ most basic needs. But even if the content is useful, firms need to ensure that localized sites meet the other two components of the customer experience pyramid — they must be easy to use and enjoyable. 

 

 

Thousands of years of rich cultural heritage and Chinese consumers’ unique offline behaviors have shaped a set of needs, expectations, and perceptions that differ from those of their Western counterparts. Add the technical constraints that have defined Chinese site development, and customer experience professionals face an uphill battle in trying to solve the riddle of the Chinese online market. My new report, "What Chinese Consumers Expect From Website Experiences," answers three critical website design questions:

  • What makes a website useful to Chinese users?
  • What makes a website easy to use for Chinese users?
  • What makes a website enjoyable for Chinese users?
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Forrester’s “The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2012, China” Report Shows Differences In Technology Adoption Stage

I am delighted to announce that for the first time, our annual US and European consumers and technology benchmark reports have a Chinese counterpart: The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2012, China. This report is a graphical analysis of a range of topics about consumers and technology and serves as a benchmark for understanding how consumers change their technology adoption, usage, and behavior over time. The report, based on one of our Asia Pacific Technographics® surveys, covers a wide range of topics, such as online activities, device ownership — including penetration data and forecasts for smartphones and tablets — media consumption, retail, social media, and a deep dive on mobile.

For this report, we divided the metropolitan Chinese online consumers into three distinct groups based on their technology optimism and economic power:

  • Early adopters are high-income individuals who are also technology optimists — people who see technology as a positive force in their lives.
  • Mainstream users are either high-income technology pessimists or low-income technology optimists.
  • Laggards are low-income technology pessimists.
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The Holiday Shopping Season Hasn’t Ended Yet: The Chinese New Year Is Coming To Town

We have just celebrated Christmas, but I’m increasingly looking forward to the Chinese New Year as this will be my first time spending the Chinese New Year in China in 12 years!  

Reading the reports on how much US consumers spent this year during the holiday month made me reflect on what Chinese consumers do during their single most important holiday of the year — and how they spend their money. While the Chinese New Year is traditionally about celebrating the New Year with friends and family, in recent years an increasing number of people have chosen the unconventional route and used this time to visit other countries. According to Ctrip.com (quoted by Sina Finance), more than 50% of the packages to the US, Middle East and Africa, and Australia were booked two months before the Chinese New Year. And wherever Chinese travelers go, they shop: If you’ve ever seen a Chinese travel group’s itinerary, you will know that a couple of stops at a shopping mall or an outlet are usually incorporated into the plan.

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