SaaS: Vendors Separated By A Common Language

Peter O'Neill

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) is rapidly becoming “Everything-as-a-Service” (or, as a client said to me last week, “All-as-a-Service”).  I’ve been reporting the impact of SaaS on IT management software for nearly two years now and I keep saying that SaaS is really a phenomenon of new market entrants with compelling arguments against incumbent suppliers. Operators like ServiceNow.com, ManageEngine, Splunk, and SpiceWorks are leading a charge to replace HP, BMC Software, and CA installations. So it’s NOT really a trend impacting small and medium businesses only: many enterprises, even large ones, now also prefer a SaaS solution for their systems monitoring, IT asset management, service desk, or even discovery and CMDB management.

In the last weeks there has been a series of SaaS announcements by the megavendors. But the inquiries coming in from Forrester clients imply that things are not all that clear on these announcements. So here is a quick summary. As you will see, while riding the SaaS wave, they each interpret it differently.

CA now has a Service Desk On Demand offering based on their Service Desk r12 product. It’s run on dedicated installation in their data center or as a multi-tenant instance in one of CA’s partners installations also hosted there. CA clearly wants to limit the service to their target enterprise market.  They will control this by requiring a minimum 1 year contract (with financial incentives for signing for 2 or even 3 years), a minimum of 50 service desk analysts (you pay per analyst per month) and, most importantly, you cannot just sign up for the service on the web, you have to be approved by CA first.

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Getting Ready For My Teleconference On Field Marketing

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

I like I like to be prepared. Next Monday I give (present? perform?
recite?) my first Forrester Teleconference about field marketing. See http://www.forrester.com/rb/teleconference/field_marketing_professionals_must_adapt_to_new/q/id/6065/t/1

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Should you believe everything you read in a blog?

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

Or ...Opalis NOT Acquired By Microsoft


We analysts always tend to want to be the first on the stage with impending news and blogs are a perfect medium for getting information out as quickly as possible. In fact, blogs can even sometimes be just a little ahead of the news it is predicting, and are sometimes held responsible for the said event. That is why financial analysts, when they blog, always disclose their portfolios in relation to the companies mentioned in the blog.

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New VPR for IT Management Software - Call For Submittals

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

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Hello Everybody - Can I be of interest?

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

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Still Accessible: But Elsewhere

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

Pretty soon now, you will be noticing that I am no longer posting reports or blogs on the Vendor Strategy Professional pages. This does not mean that I have left the stage. It is just that I am assuming a new research focus and targeting my reports at a new role, one serviced within the Technology Product Marketing and Marketing pages. I will be building up research for one of my favorite marketing contributors, the Field Marketing Manager, that true marketing schizophrenic.

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The Great Escape: Role Model For Enabling The Great Sale

Who’s Your Real Customer? The Answer Might Surprise You

Ellen Carney

Ellen Carney [Posted by Ellen Carney]

 

Every once in a while, I come across one of those situations where the answer seems so obvious that I have to wonder if they already know the answer, but just want to know what you’re going to say. You know, like Perry Mason asking the question, but he already knows the answer?

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What Do Swedish Putty And Product Demos Have In Common?,

Ellen Carney

Ellen Carney [Posted by Ellen Carney]

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Re-Engineer The Relationship Between Insurance Tech Buyers And Sellers

Ellen Carney

Ellen Carney [Posted by Ellen Carney]

Insurance IT buyers have distinct preferences when it comes to how they learn about new technology.  Tech vendors think IT buyers learn about the hottest technology because of the bright, shiny stuff that their marketing organizations spend all kinds of time and money producing. Wrong.

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