HTML5 – Maturing Desktop Browser Support Opens The Door To Enhanced Commerce Experiences

 

eBusiness and channel strategy professionals are no strangers to HTML5. Ubiquitous support for the next generation of open web technologies (HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript) across smartphones and tablets has made it easy for mobile development teams to start leveraging these technologies. However, fragmented browser support for HTML5 and CSS3 features on desktop browsers has thus far dampened the appetite of developers to embed HTML5 into their desktop eCommerce sites.

As we roll towards 2013, the tide is turning; leading online brands, including Apple, Best Buy, Four Seasons Hotels, and Rue La La to name a few, are now putting the features of HTML5 to use on their desktop sites with the goal of enhancing the online experience for customers using modern browsers like Chrome, Firefox, and IE9. We are at an inflection point: With consumer adoption of HTML5-“capable” desktop browsers widespread and web developer understanding of the technology rapidly maturing, HTML5 is no longer an emerging toolset for mobile and tablet development. Instead, it is fast becoming the de facto standard for web experience innovation across touchpoints.

As eBusiness teams evaluate the business case for HTML5 on the desktop, it is important to remember that this not an all-new technology— it is a collection of individual features that extend the existing W3C HTML standards. The decision to start using HTML5 or CSS3 does not require any changes to or throwing away of existing code. Instead, eBusiness teams can simply enhance the user experience of existing sites by incrementally using the new features of HTML5. HTML5 puts more tools in the box, but it doesn’t change the fundamentals of how to build the website.

In my latest report The Coming Of HTML5, I explore the important role that HTML5 and CSS3 have to play in the ongoing evolution of desktop eCommerce experiences. The report looks at the new capabilities that these technologies bring to the table and how eBusiness teams are putting these to use. I encourage you to download and read the report and I would be happy to discuss this topic with Forrester clients considering HTML5 for the backbone of their multi-touchpoint web strategy. 

Comments

comments

positive post. I appreciate your thinking.

HTML5 and the open web platform

I'm happy to see that others realize the importance of where the web platform sits right now. HTML5 truly is a new paradigm for how we leverage web technology. I actually wrote a (free) article about this topic, titled "JavaScript and HTML5 Now", which explores where the web platform was, how it got where it is today, and what the evolving technology means for where it's going. I, too, believe we're at a major inflection point in the history of the web platform. I hope you'll consider reading my article: http://oreillynet.com/oreilly/javascript/radarreports/javascript-html5-n...

Hi Kyle, thanks for sending

Hi Kyle, thanks for sending over the link; a great read on my flight last night.

We are at an inflection

We are at an inflection point: With consumer adoption of desktop browsers widespread and web developer understanding of the technology rapidly maturing, HTML5 is no longer an emerging toolset for mobile and tablet development. genericviagratab.com

You’ve tersely described the

You’ve tersely described the status quo on the desktop, but I see a future that’s not nearly as grim (or far away) as the picture you painted. You might have seen our recent Beta announcement for Google Chrome Frame, a plugin that’s allowing developers in enterprises to target HTML5 while still supporting IE and legacy content. Other browsers are coming along fast. Firefox has gotten some great support for CSS gradients, has transitions on the way, and is leading in important areas like WOFF. Progress in the open web isn’t a regimented progression along a straight line, but if we step back only a very little bit, things are looking up.

with Regards..
Nicole from HTML/HTML5 Development

I love HTML5, but the biggest turn-off is

I love HTML5, but the biggest turn-off in HTML5 is that it doesn't support Internet Explorer. This is the reason why most of the people prefer Flash over HTML5. What do you guys think ?

Regards,
HTML5 App Development

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