All Grown Up: Goofus And Gallant Are Developers

Mike_Gualtieri_LampYou are not going to believe this. Goofus and Gallant grew up and they both became application development professionals. Inseparable as they are, they both landed jobs at a global medical supply company in Parsippany, NJ where they develop enterprise supply chain web applications. Gallant has a bit less hair than he used to and Goofus is sporting a "Comdex" tattoo. But, these guys are basically the same as they ever were. (Remember Goofus and Gallant from Highlights Magazine For Children)

We Can Still Learn A Lot From Them

Goofus forgets to check-in his code before going a week-long vacation to Martha's Vineyard.

Gallant always checks-in his code and makes thoughtful revision comments on the changes each night before he goes home.

Job Opening: $400,000+ Per Year Application Developer

Mike_Gualtieri_Forrester Ever since I read today that Goldman Sachs formerly employed a $400,000 programmer, I have been contemplating a career change. What software could Sergey Aleynikov develop that you or I couldn't also develop for $400K per year? Whatever, he knows must be valuable because he apparently left the Goldman job headed for a better one that would have paid him 3 times that amount. He would have that is, if he hadn't been arrested by the FBI.

Sergey is probably not writing any code right now, because he has been charged with "theft of trade secrets" by the FBI after he alledgedly stole codes used for sophisticated automated stock trading, improperly copied proprietary computer code, and then uploaded it to a computer server in Germany.

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Do Application Developers Need To Change Their Ways?

Mike_gualtieri_formal01Controversies and eccentricities notwithstanding, Michael Jackson is a brilliant musical artist and performer. I was acutely aware of this on February 2009 in London after 3 colleagues and I went to see the new West End show, Thriller Live at the Lyric Theater after Forrester's EMEA Enterprise Architecture Forum. If you are in London, go to this show! Go, especially if you have no rhythm because you will probably find it there. The show is a celebration of Michael's breathtaking musical career shown through the performances of very talented singers and dancers. The hits are nonstop.The night flies by leaving you wanting more. Go.

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Cloudmania: Developers Need A Personal Cloud

Mike_Gualtieri_Formal01 Cloud, Private Cloud,     fill in the blank   . Personal Cloud. Don't be surprised if you hear about the Personal Cloud. It is the next natural progression in Cloudmania. Don't get me wrong. I am a fan of Cloud computing as an exciting new deployment option for applications as I said in a previous post.

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Charles Darwin's Assessment Of Application Developers

Charlesdarwin This month marks Charles Darwin's 200th birthday. His classic work, The Origin Of Species, wasn’t much of a hit when it was originally published back in 1859 but no one can argue that the idea of evolution hasn’t changed the world. Survival of the fittest is an elegant explanation of why so many species exist, why some become extinct, and why some flourish. So, what would Charles Darwin have to say about the species that are so affectionately known as application development professionals? Hmmm.

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Two Stage Rocket

Mike_gualtieri_formal01 I just spent the day at Progress Software's annual analyst day. The highlight of the event is, always, to hear from their customers about how they are getting real things done. This year we heard from: EMC, Sallie Mae, TD Securities, Royal Dikzwager, BT Global Services, Lincoln Financial Group, Sabre Holdings, and Fiserv.

The theme: High velocity business demands high velocity technologies such as complex event processing, enterprise infrastructure, data infrastrcuture, and others.

But, this post is about Kenneth Rugg, VP and GM of Integration Infrastrcuture for Progress  Software, comments on open source software.

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Horses for courses?

Quarterhorse_2 I was on a conference call with my Research Director, Mike Gilpin and colleague Charles Brett the other day discussing complex event processing and business rules when suddenly Mike and Charles starting talking about "horses for courses". Say what? We went from talking about events and rules to horses and courses? I never heard this expression before so I asked. And, for those of you who think that I am provincial, I asked several other people in our Cambridge, Massachusetts office and they were dumbfounded as well.

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Cloud Or No Cloud You Still Have To Write Code

Mike_gualtieri_formal01I am experiencing Cloud fatigue already. If I hear anyone even come close to uttering the word "Cloud 2.0", I might be found hiding in the Forrester fitness room in a fetal position. I am a fan of Cloud computing and my colleague James Staten has a great report on cloud in the enterprise. I think that cloud computing such Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure, IBM, Google AppEngine, and others are legitimate and have a great future in infrastructure. What I am not a fan of is the buzzword grab going on by many technology companies saying they work in the cloud, have a cloud strategy, or have a new cloud offering à la SOA, Web 2.0, and whatever is next. Vendor X can work in the cloud. Well, no kidding. You just spin up your platform in the cloud and run your app on it.

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Spotlight: C++ is still cool

Mike_gualtieri_lamp Sometimes enterprise IT development shops that are doing development in Java, C#, VB.NET forget that it all began with C++. Invented in 1981 by Bjarne Stroustrup, C++ was arguably the first popular object-oriented language even though languages like Smalltalk proceeded it. Java was first released by Sun in 1995, fourteen years after C++ was invented.

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Are Great Application Developers Making A Comeback?

"I don't want 10 developers. I want 3 great ones", is what a client told me when I asked him how his company was responding to the economic crisis. Of course, I think this is good advice even in good times and I think we have gotten away from this is recent years. Why? I think there are couple of reasons:

  1. Outsourcing changed the focus from finding great developers to hiring large numbers of developers.
  2. Project managers and business analysts worked their darndest to separate developers from the business problems that develoeprs need to solve. Agile has mitigated this a bit, but treating developers like machines on an assembly has been in fashion for years now.
  3. There are fewer great developers because back in the day people passionate about software development gravitated towards a career in application development. Now it is a career choice for many and percentage of great developers has been diluted and thus they are harder to find.

I am asking every application development professional I talk to, including you, the following questions:

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