How Are Airlines Embracing Mobile Moments?

Xiaofeng Wang

Mobile is changing travelers’ behaviors and expectations worldwide, making mobile moments the next battleground for airlines. My Brief: Airlines Must Embrace Mobile Moments To Differentiate tells B2C marketing professionals managing airline brands how to better address airline travelers in their most relevant mobile moments.

Nobody is more mobile than an airline traveler — from buying a ticket to managing the in-transit and on-board experience to sharing that experience, mobile is an active touchpoint throughout the entire customer life cycle. Have airlines mastered all of these mobile moments? The answer is often “No” — there are still mobile moments that key airlines seldom cover (see figure).

Specifically:

  • Most airlines focus on mastering mobile moments at the buy and use stages. Smart airlines strive to provide convenient, time-saving measures that are better than those of online travel agencies (OTAs) and other airlines, such as “upgrade at the boarding gate” feature in its mobile app.
  • Some airlines serve mobile customers well at the discover and ask stages. Smart airlines help prospects and customers discover promotions beyond air tickets and travel packages, such as cross-border shopping, through multiple mobile channels.
  • Few airlines master mobile moments at the explore and engage stages. Compared with OTAs, airlines put forth far less effort creating mobile moments at the explore stage, whereas product comparisons and customer reviews are common features for OTAs.
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Snaps for Snapchat

Jessica Liu

Bloomberg recently reported that Snapchat surpassed Twitter in daily active users. Kudos to Snapchat, which is only half as old as Twitter, but why do we keep comparing Snapchat to Twitter? Or to Instagram? The industry is desperate to neatly categorize Snapchat under social media, but I would argue that Snapchat is equal parts messaging app and social network, putting it in a class of its own.

Let's break it down:

  • Messaging apps are built on the premise of private conversation: 1 to 1 (yes, group chat exists, but it's contained). You send specific messages tailored to the individual recipient. See: WhatsApp, WeChat, Skype, Viber, LINE, Telegram, Kik. With the exception of Asia's sophisticated app hybrids, today's messaging apps are not intended for blanket broadcast messaging.
  • Traditional social networks are built on the premise of broadcasting: 1 to many. You build up a network of friends (and, in some cases, the general public) and you blanket spam them with your post. See: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest. While they accommodate private conversation (Facebook Messenger is its own rightful messaging app, Instagram's and Twitter's Direct Message, LinkedIn InMail), it is not their primary foundation.
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Facebook Offline Conversion and Site Metrics: Use With Caution

Tina Moffett

In collaboration with Jim Nail.

 

On Tuesday, Facebook announced new solutions for businesses to drive people to their stores and measure the amount of store visits and in-store sales following their Facebook mobile ad campaigns.  Before breaking out the bubbly, let’s break down Facebook’s new measurement capabilities, and evaluate what it means for marketers.

 

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Will Microsoft’s Big Bet On B2B Social Pay Off?

Carlton Doty

Okay, you’ve read countless opinion pieces on the blockbuster deal where Microsoft paid a notable (nearly 9x) premium for LinkedIn.  One could argue that it’s about time someone snatched up LinkedIn…that was my initial reaction, and perhaps yours too.  But why Microsoft, and why now?  Well, it should be obvious that this is a B2B play.  In fact, our own Melissa Parrish eloquently outlined the minimal relevance to B2C firms in her blog post yesterday.

However, this morning, Melissa and several other colleagues here at Forrester published our quick take on what this deal really means. It breaks down to 3 fundamental things:

  • Data. As today's marketing tech goes, Microsoft lags significantly in two areas: customer identity management and proprietary data assets. LinkedIn solves that problem by integrating 433 million LinkedIn profiles. Microsoft will get its hands on data about how those individuals use products like Office 365, email, and Skype.
     
  • CRM. Microsoft is clearly firing a shot across the bow of Salesforce. In the CRM space, Dynamics has some traction in the enterprise, but it has traditionally been an alternative for small and medium-size businesses requiring more accessible price points than Salesforce commands.
     
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Microsoft + LinkedIn = Everything But An Advertising Play

Melissa Parrish

The second the story broke about Microsoft’s $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn, everybody you can think of who has any kind of an opinion about either company, social media, business productivity, enterprise software, the stock market, data and mergers & acquisitions in general has weighed in on the deal’s implications for their areas of expertise. Ordinarily this would inspire some serious eye-rolling in me, but in this case it’s warranted because Microsoft has its hands in so many businesses and enterprise applications, and LinkedIn has so much consumer activity and data that many people-- talking heads or otherwise-- have a relevant take. Speaking of which, Forrester clients should keep an eye on our website tomorrow morning for first-take analysis from all sides of our research org. Spoiler alert: The implication for social selling and business productivity are potentially massive.

 

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Hit Restart With Your Media Agency

Sarah Sikowitz

In collaboration with Susan Bidel, Richard Joyce and Jim Nail

Yesterday, the ANA released the findings from an eight month research study into the issue of transparency within the media agency industry.  The findings are damning, but not surprising for those who have been following this issue. The phrase in the report that caught my eye was this: “evidence of a fundamental disconnect in the advertising industry regarding the basic nature of the advertiser-agency relationship.” 

In other words, it’s the advertising-agency relationship that stinks.

Look past the rebates, the free cash disguised as “research and consulting” and the media mark ups and what you’ll see is the advertiser-agency relationship that has been under strain for years has finally completely collapsed.  Three factors have driven the industry to this point:

  • Agency success metrics tied to an outdated approach. Clients expect high impression levels, high click volume – all at a low cost. This doesn’t allow a lot of room for media agencies to show additional value beyond scale and efficiency. The result is that agencies continue to look for opportunities to drive more impressions and lower CPMs without any accountability for real business and revenue impact.
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The Importance of Creating a Marketing and Technology Lingua Franca

Melissa Parrish

As the IT agenda gives way to the Business Technology agenda, marketers and technologists are working together more closely and more often than ever before, but many of them don’t feel like those collaborations are going smoothly yet. In fact, lack of communication is the No. 1 reason cited for a very poor relationship between developers and other parts of the company, according to our data.  

One of the reasons for this miscommunication is that marketers and technologists often use very common words differently. We experienced this ourselves a few months ago at a large gathering of analysts at Forrester HQ, with both marketing and business technology analysts represented. First, there was plenty of acronym and abbreviation confusion: Did DR mean direct response or disaster recovery?  Was CRM customer relationship management or change request management?

But there was also confusion around very common terms that both marketers and technologists use, but which mean slightly different things for each. This is the kind of misunderstanding that you might not even know in happening because you have no reason to think you mean different things until some brave soul raises her hand and admits she doesn’t understand something. (Think the meaning of “database” is obvious? Think again!)

A few weeks ago, we published a report that looks into this further and our research revealed that these conversational mishaps are having huge repercussions on projects and business results. For example, one brand we spoke with had a half-million dollar project go nearly totally off the rails over a misunderstanding of the word “strategy.”

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Catch The Enterprise Marketing Technology Wave

Rusty Warner

I am pleased to announce TWO new Forrester Wave™ reports for B2C marketers. Today we published the Forrester Wave™: Cross-Channel Campaign Management, Q2 2016 and the Forrester Wave™: Enterprise Marketing Software Suites, Q2 2016. The former will help you compare the 15 leading campaign management vendors, while the latter will help you evaluate 9 vendors that have assembled broader enterprise marketing technology portfolios.

Cross-Channel Campaign Management (CCCM)

Three of the four leading vendors – Adobe, Salesforce, and Oracle – base their CCCM solutions on email service provider acquisitions. All have expanded their cross-channel coverage, and their customer data management and analytics functionality continues to evolve. Conversely, SAS is the only leader among traditional CCCM vendors, because of its customer data management and analytics prowess, as well as evolving digital marketing capabilities.

IBM is a strong performer because of its enterprise CCCM and digital marketing capabilities, but it has yet to fully integrate its acquired assets. Similarly, Selligent is currently integrating its CCCM and digital marketing capabilities for the mid-market. Pitney Bowes and Pegasystems offer solid analytics and RTIM capabilities, though they lag the leaders when it comes to outbound digital marketing. SmartFocus, Emarsys, and Experian are challenging established CCCM and digital marketing vendors with their interaction-focused solutions. RedPoint Global offers customer data management and marketing automation to support CCCM execution.

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Post-Digital Marketers Use Customer Experience To Demonstrate Their Brand Promises

Shar VanBoskirk

Customer experience is critical to business success.  But customer experience simply for customer experience sake can leave businesses chasing customer whims that don't align with operational goals or brand identity. (See Figure 5 in Thriving In A Post Digital World).  Forrester Senior Analyst Joana van den Brink-Quintanilha tackled this difficulty of balancing customer experience and brand experience in her after-lunch presentation at Marketing Europe 2016. 

Her research identifies four ways to avoid brand and customer experience dissonance:

1) Paint a vivid picture -- This is not about building a 60 page static brand strategy, but rather determining the key emotional moments a customer goes through and identifying how to meet those needs with on brand experiences.  AirBNB storyboarded critical moments for both their hosts and guests and uses these storyboards to focus the efforts of marketing, customer service and employee training.

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Marketing Leaders Will Provoke Customer Obsession By Developing Post-Digital Strategies

Shar VanBoskirk

And Forrester's Marketing 2016 Europe forum is under way!

Forum host Melissa Parrish just kicked off our two days in London by acknowledging that ideas related to customer obsession aren't new per se.  John Spedan Lewis, originated the John Lewis Partnership in 1929 which distributed profits from the John Lewis department stores to employees, specifically so that employees would be invested in delivering exceptional customer service.  What is new today is that the post-digital climate has raised customer expectations from brand experiences and introduced new, faster ways for businesses to get customers what they want in their moment of need.

So how can you -- as a marketing leader at your organization -- drive customer obsession and post-digital strategies?

James McQuivey presented the answer to this question based on his most recent research Leadership In The Age of The Customer.

How leaders act has more influence on business culture and transformation than who they are or what they say.  Customer obsessed leaders specifically:

  • Measure customer obsessed behavior
  • Reward people for performing against those metrics
  • Unblock performance inhibitors by removing obstacles
  • Model customer obsessed behaviors that they want employees to demonstrate
  • Provide resources

In my morning keynote tomorrow, I will be addressing how demonstrating the actions James highlighted will help your brand be more Human, Helpful and Handy -- the key characteristics of post-digital marketers.  Can't wait!