Consumer Privacy Attitudes: A 2015 Update

Fatemeh Khatibloo

Back in 2013, my colleague Anjali Lai and I wondered how the "summer of Snowden" was affecting consumer attitudes about privacy. So, we fielded a survey and ran some qualitative analysis in our ConsumerVoices Market Research Online Community. A year later, we used that historical data, combined with Consumer Technographics and social listening data to see how perception and behavior were changing. It was a fascinating study

Fast forward another year: it's now pre-pre-primary season in the US, and candidates are talking about privacy and personal data protection. There have been three more major data breaches affecting millions of Americans. The adblocking debate is at fever pitch, while Internet giants make privacy a point of differentiation. Obviously, we decide to run our study a third time. And this time, we incorporate (opted-in, permission-based) data from our Consumer Technographics Behavioral Study.

Our findings? Consumers are more willing than ever to 1) walk away from your business if you fail to protect their data and privacy; 2) adopt technologies like tracker-blockers and VPNs to limit their exposure to data misuse; and 3) extend their protective actions to the physical realm. 

And the real kicker is that, if you're one of the marketers who's been counting on Millennials who "don't care" about their online privacy, you're going to be waiting a long time.

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How mobile will transform business in 2016

Thomas Husson

With my peers Julie A. Ask, Jeffrey S. Hammond, Michael Facemire, Tyler Shields, Christian Kane, Jennifer Wiseand many other analysts, we put together our thoughts in a new 2016 Mobile predictions report on what to expect in the mobile space next year across industries and roles.

We believe 2016 will be the most consequential year for companies on the path to customer obsession, and that includes adapting empowered customers who expect to get anything they want immediately, in context on their mobile devices.

What role does mobile play in customer obsession, and how can businesses leapfrog their competition to deliver superior customer experiences? Here are three ways Forrester predicts mobile will change the ways business leaders operate in 2016.

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2016 Mobile Predictions: Alternative Ecosystems Beyond Android and iOS Will Emerge

Thomas Husson

Customer-obsessed businesses will take personalization to the next level in 2016. By the end of 2016, Forrester forecasts that 4.8 billion individuals globally will use a mobile phone, and as that number continues to grow, customer-obsessed business leaders have vast opportunities to deliver great customer experiences via mobile.


Mobile moments -- a time when consumers picks up their mobile devices to get what they want in that moment of need --  are the next battleground where to win, serve, and retain customers. Many executives believe they should manufacture and own these moments through their native branded iOS or Android apps. While this is, of course, one way to serve their best and most loyal customers Forrester research found that consumers use fewer apps and concentrate the vast majority of their time in just few apps.

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Uncover Your Customers' Mobile Pathways To Win In Mobile Moments

Jennifer Wise

We all know it: Consumers are glued to thier mobile devices, glancing at them hundreds of times in a day, and spending almost 67 hours on apps and sites in a month. These glances -- anytime you pull out your phone to do something --  are what we call "mobile moments." What could this moment be? To set an alarm. To browse Facebook. To check your email. To go to your favorite retailer's site to shop. To do seemingly anything you wish.

The meaning of these multiplying mobile moments to brands and marketers is clear: You need a mobile strategy. But what should this strategy be? How can you win in your customers' mobile moments?

To help answer this, Forrester has launched a new report: Master Your Customers' Mobile Pathways. A collaboration with Ted Schadler and Nicole Dvorak , it presents a new type of data analysis: Mobile Pathways. So, what is this data and how can you use it? Here are some key things to know:

  • What is mobile pathway analysis? Mobile pathway analysis is defined as: Charting the immediate path customers take to and from your brand's mobile moments.
  • Where does mobile pathways data come from? We’ve been tacking mobile sessions in the US and UK to learn about how people use their phones – what sites they visit, what apps they go to, and what string of actions they take in a mobile session.
  • What does mobile pathway analysis tell you? In mobile pathways analysis, we aim to help answer 5 pressing questions:
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Alipay Tops Forrester’s Review Of Chinese Banks' Mobile Services

Xiaofeng Wang

Mobile banking is gaining momentum all over the world, and China is no exception. In August 2015, for the first time, Forrester evaluated the mobile banking offerings of five of China’s largest retail banks plus Alipay; we’ve just published the results in our 2015 China Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark report.

To help mobile banking teams benchmark their mobile banking capabilities, identify critical mobile features, and plan for the future, we used our Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark methodology to evaluate the mobile banking services of six of the largest retail banks in China, including five traditional banks — Agricultural Bank of China (ABC), Bank of China (BOC), China Construction Bank (CCB), China Merchants Bank (CMB), and Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC) — and one nontraditional bank: Alipay.

The Chinese mobile banking services we reviewed achieved an average score of 55 out of 100; while this is slightly better than banks in Singapore and the UK, many Chinese banks still lag behind their peers in Australia, Europe, and North America. The headlines:

  • Alipay outperforms the five traditional banks. Alipay started as a third-party online payment platform but now fulfills the same functions as a bank. The only nontraditional bank in our review, Alipay not only earned the best overall score of 67, but also scored highest in four of the seven categories in our benchmark: account and money management, transactional features, service features, and marketing and sales. Alipay excels with many mobile features that none of the major traditional banks currently provide. For example, it allows customers to easily find a past transaction using sorting, filtering, and natural language keyword search.
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It All Comes Back To The Basics

Rebecca McAdams

Last week, Sailthru held it’s annual Lift 2015 conference, where it debuted new product releases and enhancements, and delved into the strategies and tactics that leading digital marketers have employed with success to increase retention, decrease churn, and create lasting profitability. One-to-one personalization was a resounding theme throughout the conference, that hit on three critical components marketers should keep in mind:


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Join Forrester's 2015 China Social Marketing Online Survey

Xiaofeng Wang

Forrester’s 2015 online survey for social marketing in China is now open. If you’re a marketing leader who is involved in social marketing in China, please take this opportunity to provide your perspective.

Based on the survey results, we will update the Benchmarking Social Marketing Efforts In China report published in November 2013. The updated report will help marketers check if their social marketing efforts are keeping pace with those of their peers.

Why is your input important? This survey will help us:

  • Understand your key focuses in social marketing. Marketing leaders in China put a lot of faith in social marketing and adopt various social platforms and tactics. This data will help you benchmark your key focus for social marketing.
  • Outline your pain points in achieving your social marketing goals. Marketing leaders in China are increasingly investing in social media and expect positive returns, but face internal and external challenges to achieving their business goals.

We will use the results to help marketing leaders in China:

  • Understand key trends to prioritize social marketing efforts. We will highlight the most important social platforms and tactics that you need to focus on and help you prioritize your social marketing efforts effectively.
  • Overcome key social marketing challenges. We will analyze the main challenges that social marketers face in China and help you plan and evaluate your social marketing strategies better.
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Joining The B2C Research Team Ranks

Rebecca McAdams

Hey Everyone!

I’ve been at Forrester over a year and a half now, originally coming from an analyst support role, to more recently, working with Shar VanBoskirk to drive our research around email marketing. I’m excited to announce that, going forward, I will be leading our coverage of the technologies, services, and analytics that support email marketing.

My first report in this new role was an update to our email marketing playbook assessment chapter. This report allows marketers to assess their email marketing campaigns around specific benchmarks defined by Forrester that assess both their business processes, as well as the user experience of their campaigns. Building off of this assessment, I will be publishing an update to our “Best And Worst Of Email Marketing” playbook report, with an assessment of 70 email campaigns, benchmarked against the criteria from the report mentioned above.

I am looking forward to getting to know many of you better and following the evolution of this exciting space. Whether you have insights to share, questions to ask, or email technology and services that you want to tell me about, I want to hear from you! Please engage with me via our inquiry and/or briefing teams, or track me down at Forrester’s upcoming Marketing 2016 Event (April 26, 2016).

Most Marketers Don't Use Social Relationship Platforms

Nate Elliott

Social Relationship Platforms (SRPs) like Sprinklr, Sprefast, and Hootsuite save marketers time and help them more effectively manage their branded Facebook pages and Twitter accounts -- but most marketers still don't use these valuable tools.

We recently analyzed the Facebook posts made by 5,000 large brand pages and found that two-thirds post exclusively through Facebook's native tools. That's right: 67% of the biggest brands we could find didn't make a single Facebook post through a third-party vendor during the six week window we studied.

Most social marketers post exclusively through Facebook native tools

Twitter marketers are more likely than Facebook marketers to use SRPs -- but not by much. We looked at almost 3,000 large Twitter accounts and found that about half post natively 50% of the time or more.

Even when marketers do hire social relationship platforms, they often do most of their posting natively. This was true on both the social networks we studied, but it's especially pronounced on Twitter. In fact, most SRPs find the majority of their clients do at least 50% of their Twitter posting natively.

Most Twitter Marketers That Use Social Relationship Platforms Use Them Less Than Half The Time

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A Successful Case Of Positive Social Marketing ROI

Xiaofeng Wang

Marketing leaders face the challenge of achieving a positive ROI —in fact, it is the top challenge for the digital marketers we surveyed in China earlier this year. Fortunately, a few marketers have managed to achieve this, and Spring Airlines is one of them. My recently published report, Case Study: Spring Airlines' Digital Business Takes Off With Social Marketing, tells its success story. From it, B2C marketers can learn how to achieve positive returns on their investments in social marketing initiatives and support their transition to a digital business.

As a private airline and the first budget carrier in China, Spring Airlines is performing well despite fierce competition from much larger state-owned competitors with more resources. Since the airline’s launch a decade ago, Spring’s B2C marketing professionals have focused on making the airline's business operations as digital as possible in order to:

  • Keep operating costs low.Unlike its main competitors, Spring receives no financial support from the government. To keep operating costs low, Spring bypasses travel agents, selling tickets exclusively via its official website and some designated ticket offices.
  • Support its challenger status and catalyze customer obsession. To compensate for its smaller scale and resources, Spring successfully differentiated its brand as an early adopter of digital, mobile, and social and built an extremely close relationship with its customers.
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