Guest Post: James McDavid On Mojitos And Minimal Techno At 35,000 Feet

Nate Elliott

Our London-based Interactive Marketing Research Associate James McDavid chimes in with this great tale of how listening to and embracing your fans in social media can create powerful word-of-mouth marketing:

As every dance music aficionado knows, Miami is the place to be every March as it hosts the Winter Music Conference (WMC), an event that brings together leading lights from the industry to party, share records, and make fun of Paris Hilton. So when Dutch airline KLM announced they'd be launching a new route between Amsterdam and Miami at the end of March 2011, a couple of Dutch DJs tweeted KLM to see if the airline could move the flight forward a week to coincide with the WMC. The DJs claimed that they could fill a flight from Amsterdam to Miami solely with revelers and ravers. KLM, seeing a great opportunity to show off their social savvy, offered the DJs a challenge — if they could get 150 people to register in seven days, then KLM would move the inaugural flight forward — and, as a bonus, let the DJs spin some records in the cabin.

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Join Forrester's Tweet Jam About YOU: May 24th (Today!) At 2pm US Eastern

Melissa Parrish

As you may have seen, for the past two weeks we’ve run a tweet jam called #IMChat. Our first two topics, CORE and social influence, were well received but really about what Forrester folks think is interesting. So it’s time to turn the social media table around. What are you interested in? What do you want to talk about with your peers?

To participate, just follow the #IMChat hashtag at 2:00 p.m. If you’d like to learn more about the rules of engagement, visit this community discussion on The Forrester Community For Interactive Marketing Professionals. To read some past archives, visit the documents section of the same community.

Here are some of the questions we'll be discussing during today’s tweet jam:

1.       What digital marketing initiatives are most important to your success within your organization?

2.      What digital marketing initiative causes you the most headaches? Why?

3.      What resources do you currently use to find answers to your digital marketing questions?

4.      How do you utilize digital marketing peers in your day-to-day decision making? Are they external or internal resources?

5.       How do you utilize third-party vendors and agencies in your digital marketing programs?

Announcing The 3rd Annual Forrester B2B Groundswell Awards

Kim Celestre

[Co-authored by Zachary Reiss-Davis]

Welcome to the kick-off for the third annual Forrester B2B Groundswell Awards! We’re excited to again read all of your great submissions and examples of innovation in B2B social media marketing. 

Josh Bernoff, one of the original authors of Groundswell, already wrote a great blog post highlighting the history of the awards that I encourage you to go read. 

For the past two years, we highlighted the B2B winners in:

Best practice research reports . . .

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From Social Media Marketer To Social Media Analyst...

Kim Celestre

I am absolutely thrilled to publish my very first blog as a Senior Analyst here at Forrester and am looking forward to providing you with a lot of exciting research and thought-provoking insights on what continues to be a hot topic in the technology industry: Social Media in B2B. As many of you know, social media is evolving at a very fast pace, and one of my goals is to keep you posted on the latest trends we are seeing and how you, the tech marketer, can utilize these insights to create effective social strategies for engaging with your customers. 

How did I wind up here at Forrester? Well, prior to joining the talented TI Tech Marketing team in April, I spent 14 years at Sun Microsystems, working in various senior marketing roles. I was fortunate enough to lead some pretty groundbreaking campaigns that utilized social media and other emerging marketing tactics. These projects ranged from executing basic marketing strategies using blogs and YouTube to very complex, multi-faceted social media campaigns to drive new product adoption for Sun's software and Java product groups. Lots of fantastic stuff that is worthy of a separate blog post!

After Sun was acquired, I spent the past year at Oracle as a Global Campaigns Manager responsible for Java, cloud computing and enterprise architecture initiatives, where social media was also a big area of focus for demand generation activities. A few months ago, I was presented with an amazing opportunity to join the Forrester team, and, to make a long story short, I have now hit the ground running with a very rigorous B2B social media research agenda and a speaking engagement at next week's Forrester IT Forum in Las Vegas. 

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CORE Lessons From Best Buy, ING And IBM

Shar VanBoskirk

Last week I joined Matt Smith, VP of Marketing Services from Best Buy, Kim Verhaaf, director of Customer Intelligence at ING, and Matt Preschern, VP of Demand Programs for IBM, for a keynote panel: "Marketing Innovation in Action: How Being Adaptive Can Help You Innovate," at Unica's Marketing Innovation Summit.  To structure the panel, I introduced Forrester's CORE framework. If you're not yet familiar with CORE, its our mission that interactive marketers should adopt to help their firms adapt to the next digital decade. See a summary of the topic here or our research on The Future Of Interactive Marketing for a deep dive. 

Smith, Verhaaf and Preschern talked about the efforts they have underway to help their firms customize marketing experiences, optimize decisions and processes, respond to changing market conditions and empower employees and customers to advocate on your behalf. They raised some great points for interactive marketers to consider as they undertake CORE:

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Join Forrester's Tweet Jam On CORE: May 10th At 2pm US Eastern

Melissa Parrish

Recently you’ve heard and seen a lot about a new concept — CORE — where we at Forrester think interactive marketing is heading. CORE is a four part concept that states that to compete in the digital future marketers must: 1) customize marketing experiences; 2) optimize decisions and processes; 3) respond to changing marketing conditions; and 4) empower staff and customers to advocate for you.

If you're interested in hearing about how you and your peers can move from one phase of CORE to the next, join me (@melissarparrish) and other interactive marketers on Twitter next Tuesday, May 10, at 2 p.m. US Eastern Time.  To participate, just follow the hashtag #IMChat.  Joining me will be Forrester analysts Shar Vanboskirk, Sean Corcoran (@SeanCor), and Elizabeth Shaw (@shaw_smith2) — and interactive marketers from FedEx who will tell us how they've implemented CORE.

Here are some of the questions we'll be discussing during next week’s TweetJam:

  1. After taking the CORE diagnostic test (included below), what surprised you?
  2. What one aspect of CORE is most urgent for you to prioritize?
  3. How do you think your industry or company type (B2B versus B2C) impacts your prioritization?
  4. How can you go about implementing CORE? How long will it take? Will you create an action plan first or dive right in?
  5. What does this mean for your current staffing? Will you need to find more talent or a new partner?
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Why The “Web Versus Application” Debate Is Irrelevant

Thomas Husson

Rarely a mobile conference goes by without this debate popping up: Should you build a mobile website or an application? I don’t think it really matters; in fact, I’d say it is irrelevant. This is just one of many topics where technology leads marketing by the nose— as is often the case in the mobile industry! Product strategists often forget to ask themselves the right questions: which product and services, for which audiences, at what cost, and when?

Consumer product strategists designing product experiences for mobile phones and smartphones must decide on their development priorities across the mobile Web and apps. While some believe this is a fundamental “either/or” choice, current consumer behavior suggests that consumers are using both. More than half of European (and 60% of US) consumers who download apps at least monthly also access the Internet via their mobile phones at least daily. In short, heavy app users are also heavy mobile Web users. The more frequently consumers access the Internet via their mobile phones, the more likely they are to download apps at least monthly. More than 10 billion apps have been downloaded cumulatively since the launch of the Apple App Store — the majority of them via iPhones. But this doesn’t stop iPhone owners from being the most frequent mobile Internet users: 72% of European iPhone owners (and 63% of US iPhone owners) access the mobile Internet on a daily basis.

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What Email Marketers Can Do To Protect Themselves From Email Fraud

Shar VanBoskirk

Epsilon's Symposium addressed email fraud head on, since its data breach accessed email data. Quinn Jalli, Epsilon's VP of Deliverability and ISP Relations, recommends that managing email fraud is not something to leave just to your email service provider. The wakeup call from this data breach: Brands must partner with email vendors and ISPs to protect their email send addresses, email brand assets, and in educating recipients about data usage and email fraud.  Specifically:

  • Show ISPs your legitimate emails.  Historically, marketers and ISPs haven't had much of a relationship because they were working toward different goals. Marketers want to get their emails into user inboxes, while ISPs want to manage email data volumes by blocking as many messages as possible. Well, phished emails — copies of your real thing — can be so good that neither consumers nor ISPs can tell real from fraud.  Preempt this by showing ISPs the identifying characteristics of the emails that you create. And of course any examples you have of phished messages if you have suffered this. Your email service provider can facilitate this ISP connection.
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Epsilon's Data Breach Raises Awareness Of Cyber Crime

Shar VanBoskirk

By now, you've all heard about Epsilon's April 1 data breach — an unauthorized party accessed a subset of Epsilon's email clients' data. My colleague Dave Frankland outlines the circumstances of the incident and its implications on Customer Intelligence and data security in his blog post immediately following the incident.

I attended Epsilon's Customer Symposium in Naples, Fla., last week, and I wanted to pipe in with some commentary based on what was addressed directly by Epsilon at the event.

Marketers: The way I would look at this is "if a data breach can happen to Epsilon — a firm which specializes in data and data management — it can definitely happen to me." We learned from Bryan Sartin, director of investigative services, Verizon Business Security Solutions, and Mick Walsh, supervisor, Miami Electronic Crime Task Force, US Secret Service, that electronic crime is a huge and growing business, due in part to the ease of access to consumer information online and the ease of access to the data black market through online search engines. Three-quarters of cases of electronic crimes executed through malware come from data disclosed through Facebook.

Note that most cyber crimes:

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A Discussion With Google On Search Marketing Agencies

Shar VanBoskirk

I had breakfast yesterday with John Nicoletti, head of agency operations, and Dave Tan, head of SEM development for Google. They manage Google's relationships with search marketing agencies — updating them on what Google is working on and supporting the paid search business they manage with on behalf of marketers.

We chatted a bit about the findings from my recent Search Marketing Agency Wave, and John and Dave shared with me trends and differentiators they observe from their work with agencies.  Here are our collective observations:

  • Technology doesn't differentiate agencies; how agencies use technology does. My wave does include automation as a point of differentiation in a lot of critiera. But to be clear, I don't think automation for the sake of automation is what makes an agency good. Nor does the technology enabling the automation need to be a proprietary tool developed by the agency. I'm agnostic when it comes to what tools an agency uses.  What I care about is if the agency uses technology to improve processes, scalability, efficiency, and effectiveness of marketer search programs.

    John and Dave pointed out — and I agree — that the features and functionality of search management technologies are universally very similar. The value to the marketer comes in how these tools are used to improve their overall performance and visibility.
     

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