2016 Mobile And App Marketing Trends

Thomas Husson

In November, Forrester released its mobile predictions for 2016, highlighting how mobile will act as a catalyst for business transformation and explaining why the battle for mobile moments will redefine the vendor landscape.

Let’s now take a closer look at how mobile will impact marketing in 2016.

A year ago, Forrester argued that most brands would underinvest in mobile in 2015. This is likely to remain the case this year, since too many marketers still have a narrow view of mobile as a “sub-digital” medium and channel. This is good news for the 20% of marketers who told us they have the budget they need and for the 33% who said they know how to measure mobile ROI. In 2016, this growing minority of leading marketers will start to fully integrate mobile into their marketing strategies. These mature mobile marketers will measure the impact of mobile across channels, see a clear opportunity to differentiate their brands, and increase their investments in mobile initiatives. Here’s what else we expect to happen:

  • Integrating mobile into your marketing strategy will become a key differentiator. While most brands are trying to mobilize their ads, few are going the extra mile: serving their customers in their mobile moments by transforming the entire customer experience. Only those that do go that extra mile will differentiate their brands via mobile. Leaders will also start measuring the impact of mobile on offline channels and will end up allocating up to 20% of their marketing budgets to mobile.
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Smart Banks Tap Into Customers' Mobile Moments

Xiaofeng Wang

Mobile banking continues to gather momentum worldwide and is also developing rapidly in China. Nearly half of metro Chinese consumers pay bills at least monthly on a mobile phone. While consumers are rapidly embracing mobile moments, most banks have yet to follow them. My recent published Brief: Smart Banks Tap Into Customers’ Mobile Moments tells B2C marketing professionals working at banks how to better address customers in their most relevant mobile moments throughout the customer journey.

Forrester sees the following key trends in China:

  • Banks are embracing mobile channels to serve mobile-mind-shifted customers. Top retail banks, including China Construction Bank and China Merchants Bank, have already adopted a mobile-first strategy.
  • Bank customers’ mobile moments occur throughout the customer journey . . . Leading digital banking teams are addressing customer needs in mobile moments throughout the customer life cycle across a range of mobile platforms, including WeChat.
  •   . . . but most banks don’t always serve customers in all moments. Most banks’ mobile presence primarily focuses on the buy, use, and ask stages and less on the discover, explore, and engage stages (see figure).
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Half Of Metropolitan Chinese Online Consumers Are Social Stars, But How Can You Reach Them?

Xiaofeng Wang

Marketers in China are increasingly investing in social marketing: Three-quarters of the marketers we surveyed in 2015 plan to increase their social marketing budget in 2016. However, they struggle to determine the best social marketing strategies and tactics to engage with their target audience. My report, Take Three Steps Toward Social Success, introduces Forrester’s Social Technographics® model to help them.

  • Step 1: Use the Social Technographics Score to evaluate how important social media is to your marketing plan. Based on how much social media matters to consumers’ interactions with companies (from high to low), your audience falls into one of four groups: Social Stars, Social Savvies, Social Snackers, and Social Skippers. As the majority of metro Chinese consumers are Social Stars or Social Savvies, social marketing is an urgent priority for marketers in China.
  • Step 2: Use the Social Technographics Life-Cycle Rankings to craft the right social strategy. These reveal the stages of the customer life cycle — discover, explore, buy, use, ask, or engage — in which your customers are most likely to use social media. Metro Chinese consumers use social media the most when they’re considering products. So to succeed, marketers in China should leverage social marketing more in the explore stage of the customer life cycle.
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“That’s It, I’m Tweeting!” Does It Have To Be All Bad?

Erna Alfred Liousas
Have you been so fed up with a company you've said, "That's it, I'm tweeting?" Contrast that with the times you've been so impressed with a company you've said, "That was so awesome, I'm going to tweet about it." Customers do use social to ask brands for help. In a recent New York Times article, Jonathan Pierce, director of social media for American Airlines, shares, “You now see folks with Wi-Fi on board — if they need assistance on board, they’ll tweet us,” he said. “Perhaps if their bag isn’t there within five minutes, they’ll tweet us. There’s an expectation from the customers that we’re there to listen to that and act on it.”  
 
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Online Display And Social Media Advertising Will Account For Nearly A Quarter Of Total European Advertising Revenue By 2020

Samantha Merlivat
Combined, online display and social media advertising spend will double between 2015 and 2020, growing from €14.4 billion to €28.7 billion.
 
Among the factors driving growth, the combination of mobile and premium video advertising will drive an upsurge in demand for both online display and social advertising. Advertisers will increase their investments in video and mobile ads as media consumption evolves and targeting accuracy improves.
 
Native mobile video advertising is already proving a winning formula in the social media sphere, and publishers will take notice as they further refine their video ad offerings to provide more premium inventory, preventing a decline of video ad CPMs as supply increases. In fact, mobile ad spend will overtake PC as PC flatlines in the next five years.
 
Other developments will continue to disrupt online ad revenue in the next five years: 
  • Programmatic will become the default mechanism for trading online display
  • Ad blocking will force new behaviors on the publisher side, and a greater struggle to hit the sweet spot between monetization and consumer experience.
  • Growing rivalries between Apple, Facebook, and Google for news aggregation services will further dis-intermediate publisher mobile advertising revenue.
To find all the trends affecting online display and social media advertising in the next five years, read Forrester’s European Online Display and Social Media Advertising Forecast, 2015-2020.

Beyond The Beacon Proximity-Marketing Hype, Fuel Contextual Marketing With Location Data

Thomas Husson

When it comes to location-based marketing and proximity-marketing, more often than not, marketers seem fascinated by the beacon technology.

With 82% of shoppers making their actual purchasing decision in-aisle, it’s no wonder that vendors are betting on beacons and indoor positioning systems to help marketers interact with consumers in real time.

A year ago, Forrester warned of the hype around beacons. Despite huge interest and numerous successful pilots, we have yet to see very many successful commercial rollouts. This is not so much about the technology (even though battery life and operational deployments raise technology issue), but primarily because reach is limited today and because few marketers can deliver smart contextual messages at scale. They must also define engagement scenarios and automated rules to deliver relevant messages to individual customers.

Location data alone is dumb. Sending someone a coupon to redeem in a nearby store just because they’re passing by isn’t enough. For ads and messages to be relevant, firms must combine location data with insights like past behaviors, preferences, needs, and situations. It is also likely they will have to combine multiple technologies to reduce the complexity of in-store operational deployments and boost the accuracy of location data.

There are many more opportunities than just pushing marketing messages in real-time. Using location data is more important than just capturing the attention of nearby smartphone owners — it’s about powering contextual marketing.

In particular, marketers should fuel contextual marketing with location data to:

  • Increase brand preference by delivering personalized experiences
  • Improve the customer experience on location
  • Advertise more efficiently
  • Unlock audience targeting and offer intention data
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Consumer Privacy Attitudes: A 2015 Update

Fatemeh Khatibloo

Back in 2013, my colleague Anjali Lai and I wondered how the "summer of Snowden" was affecting consumer attitudes about privacy. So, we fielded a survey and ran some qualitative analysis in our ConsumerVoices Market Research Online Community. A year later, we used that historical data, combined with Consumer Technographics and social listening data to see how perception and behavior were changing. It was a fascinating study

Fast forward another year: it's now pre-pre-primary season in the US, and candidates are talking about privacy and personal data protection. There have been three more major data breaches affecting millions of Americans. The adblocking debate is at fever pitch, while Internet giants make privacy a point of differentiation. Obviously, we decide to run our study a third time. And this time, we incorporate (opted-in, permission-based) data from our Consumer Technographics Behavioral Study.

Our findings? Consumers are more willing than ever to 1) walk away from your business if you fail to protect their data and privacy; 2) adopt technologies like tracker-blockers and VPNs to limit their exposure to data misuse; and 3) extend their protective actions to the physical realm. 

And the real kicker is that, if you're one of the marketers who's been counting on Millennials who "don't care" about their online privacy, you're going to be waiting a long time.

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How mobile will transform business in 2016

Thomas Husson

With my peers Julie A. Ask, Jeffrey S. Hammond, Michael Facemire, Tyler Shields, Christian Kane, Jennifer Wiseand many other analysts, we put together our thoughts in a new 2016 Mobile predictions report on what to expect in the mobile space next year across industries and roles.

We believe 2016 will be the most consequential year for companies on the path to customer obsession, and that includes adapting empowered customers who expect to get anything they want immediately, in context on their mobile devices.

What role does mobile play in customer obsession, and how can businesses leapfrog their competition to deliver superior customer experiences? Here are three ways Forrester predicts mobile will change the ways business leaders operate in 2016.

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2016 Mobile Predictions: Alternative Ecosystems Beyond Android and iOS Will Emerge

Thomas Husson

Customer-obsessed businesses will take personalization to the next level in 2016. By the end of 2016, Forrester forecasts that 4.8 billion individuals globally will use a mobile phone, and as that number continues to grow, customer-obsessed business leaders have vast opportunities to deliver great customer experiences via mobile.

 

Mobile moments -- a time when consumers picks up their mobile devices to get what they want in that moment of need --  are the next battleground where to win, serve, and retain customers. Many executives believe they should manufacture and own these moments through their native branded iOS or Android apps. While this is, of course, one way to serve their best and most loyal customers Forrester research found that consumers use fewer apps and concentrate the vast majority of their time in just few apps.

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Uncover Your Customers' Mobile Pathways To Win In Mobile Moments

Jennifer Wise

We all know it: Consumers are glued to thier mobile devices, glancing at them hundreds of times in a day, and spending almost 67 hours on apps and sites in a month. These glances -- anytime you pull out your phone to do something --  are what we call "mobile moments." What could this moment be? To set an alarm. To browse Facebook. To check your email. To go to your favorite retailer's site to shop. To do seemingly anything you wish.

The meaning of these multiplying mobile moments to brands and marketers is clear: You need a mobile strategy. But what should this strategy be? How can you win in your customers' mobile moments?

To help answer this, Forrester has launched a new report: Master Your Customers' Mobile Pathways. A collaboration with Ted Schadler and Nicole Dvorak , it presents a new type of data analysis: Mobile Pathways. So, what is this data and how can you use it? Here are some key things to know:

  • What is mobile pathway analysis? Mobile pathway analysis is defined as: Charting the immediate path customers take to and from your brand's mobile moments.
  • Where does mobile pathways data come from? We’ve been tacking mobile sessions in the US and UK to learn about how people use their phones – what sites they visit, what apps they go to, and what string of actions they take in a mobile session.
  • What does mobile pathway analysis tell you? In mobile pathways analysis, we aim to help answer 5 pressing questions:
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