What Will Come Of Recent Content Marketing Deals

Ryan Skinner

Last year we announced in our report about tools and technology for content marketing that:

Marketers must mix service providers and software solutions to serve their needs . . . vendors bifurcate into service partners and software solutions.

Increasingly, we’re seeing those two camps – the service providers, usually agencies, and software tools – merge in the market. Last year, WPP took a small, strategic stake in Percolate to “strengthen its capabilities in fast-growing sectors.” Then, yesterday, Havas Media announced a strategic partnership with Newscred thus:

NewsCred’s cloud-based software, combined with Havas Media Group’s expertise and data analytics, gives clients access to an unrivalled and fully integrated management tool covering the complete content marketing value chain across all platforms: from content strategy and planning to production and validation through to content curation and publication. 

I spoke with Newscred’s CEO, Shafqat Islam, to cut through some of the jargon and tell me what this means. The two will elevate an informal relationship into a specific go-to-market strategy where Havas provides strategy, creative and paid media/analytics, while Newscred’s in for the content technology backbone and its licensed and original content offerings.

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What Can We Expect At Mobile World Congress 2015?

Thomas Husson

I remember the first time I attended 3GSM in Cannes: It was primarily a B2B telecoms trade show and centered on DVB-H, WiMAX, and other technology-centric acronyms. Fast-forward 11 years, and Mobile World Congress (MWC) will be the center of the business world for a couple of days (March 2 to 5). Some things don’t change: We will continue to hear too much about technology. Simply ignore the hype, especially around 5G; it will have no impact at all on your marketing strategy for the next five years!

However, the list of keynote speakers is a good indication of what MWC has become: a priority event for leaders willing to transform their businesses. The CEOs of Facebook, Renault-Nissan, SAP, MasterCard, and BBVA will be speaking, and more than 4,500 CEOs will be among the 85,000 attendees (only 25% of which are from operators). It is fascinating to see how mobile has changed the world in the past 10 years — not just in the way that we live and communicate but also in terms of disrupting every business. I strongly believe that mobile will have a bigger impact than the PC or Web revolutions. Why?

First, mobile is the fastest and most ubiquitous technology ever to spread globally. People in Asia and Africa are skipping the PC Internet and going direct to mobile phones; they’re the ultimate convergent device and often the only way to reach people in rural areas. As Andreessen Horowitz's Benedict Evans put it, mobile is “eating the world”. It has already cannibalized several markets, such as cameras, video recorders, and GPS, and is now disrupting entire industries, changing the game for payments, health, and education, especially in emerging countries. Second, mobile is the bridge to the physical world. It is not just another “subdigital” channel. This alone has a huge impact on business models. Last, mobile is a catalyst for business transformation.

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Video Consumption Behavior -- Corroborating Evidence

Jim Nail

Sorry for that rather legalistic/nerdy headline. As I mentioned in my last post, Forrester's data on Making Sense of New Video Consumption Behaviors stimulated a discussion of methodologies, and particularly the challenges with our self-reported survey methodology. I agree, this approach has some flaws, as does any research methodology. That's why we're trained here to look for multiple data points and then to interpret them to give as accurate a view as we can of what's happening in the market.

So I just came across an article that I had read while I was writing that report which provides additional evidence. In it, NBC Universal's AlanWurtzel describes the digital viewing numbers they are beginning to provide, using behavior data from Nielsen, Rentrak, Omniture, and Hulu. These numbers point in the same direction, and perhaps point to even larger changes than Forrester's data indicate.

The article cites numbers for two shows, on a live-plus-seven-day basis. For The Blacklist, digital viewing accounts for 17% of the total viewership, while digital views are 37% of Parks & Recreation's total.

These data sets and NBC's methodology have their own gaps and weaknesses, no doubt. But I believe that is a matter of degree, not direction. These numbers -- and Forrester's -- don't have the degree of precision needed for the currency of the TV market, but they clearly indicate that a significant change is happening in consumer viewing behavior that advertisers need to factor into their planning. 

The Future Of Mobile Wallets Lies Beyond Payments

Thomas Husson

Apple Pay makes up more than $2 out of $3 spent on purchases using contactless payment across the three major US card networks. I agree with my colleague Sucharita Mulpuru that this is likely a big chunk of a small pie, considering the lower maturity of the mobile contactless ecosystem in the US. It's always better to look for absolute value. In this regard, PayPal processed $46 billion in mobile payment volume in 2014, up 68% over 2013.

Should marketers care about mobile wallets? Yes. Mobile wallets are not just about mobile payments. Consumers want a better shopping experience. Offering faster or more-secure payments is not enough; wallet providers will have to solve real pain points, such as giving consumers the ability to see what’s on stored value cards at any moment in time, access loyalty points, or automatically receive digital copies of payment receipts. In particular, 57% of US online adult smartphone users are interested in having access to loyalty program points and rewards within a mobile wallet. Access to loyalty rewards from brands is the most wanted feature from consumers, and it's the one least integrated in mobile wallets today.

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Two Weeks Left To Enter The 2015 Forrester Groundswell Awards!

Nate Elliott

You deserve to be recognized for the great work you do in social -- but there's not much time left! 

We're now accepting entries for the 2015 Forrester Groundswell Awards, and we'd love a chance to recgonize your social programs for their excellence. The deadline for entries this year is February 20, and we're once again accepting entries in both B2C and B2B marketing categories. Entry is free, and winners will be invited to accept their trophies in person at the Forrester Marketing Leadership Forum in April.

For more details, check out our FAQ and our entry form. We look forward to seeing your entries by February 20!

Five Myths About Mobile Apps

Thomas Husson

Time spent on mobile is skyrocketing. Since about 80% of that time is spent on apps, many marketing leaders have quickly jumped to the conclusion that the only way to reach and engage their customers is through their own branded apps. Wrong! Here are five — often ignored — good reasons for marketing leaders to broaden their mobile approach beyond their own apps:

1.   Branded apps are relevant. Yes, some of them (Starbucks, Nike, and many others) are success stories. But more often than not, branded apps don’t deliver real mobile benefits and engage only a small subset of customers. It's about time marketers connect their apps to their marketing and CRM systems to personalize and contextualize the brand experience. Marketers should launch fewer but smarter apps.

2.   Apps offer real engagement opportunities. Yes, but only for a minority of apps, according to Forrester’s App Engagement Index. Several of the most engaging apps — Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, Twitter, and WhatsApp — either don’t have or only recently introduced mobile advertising offerings. Marketers must identify the overlap between the most engaging apps and the most popular apps among their brand’s customer base. Then they have to mix content and context to tell a story that is relevant to customers in their mobile moments. It will not be about ads but about sparking a conversation instead of broadcasting a marketing message. Marketers should select the most promising partners evolving their apps as marketing platforms.

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You Must Solve Two People-Shaped Content Problems

Ryan Skinner

The problems of content marketing apply to you as a marketer whether you’re actually practicing “content marketing” or not.

In any enterprise, there’s a New York Times-scale amount of content getting produced.[i] And your customers are hoovering up content (from a brand or otherwise, in many channels, interchangably) and making decisions based upon it.[ii]

That means you’re in the content business. And the more customers control the purchase path, the more marketers find themselves in the content marketing business.

Which means you will be dealing with the problems content marketing creates. Two of these problems are particular to marketing teams and governance. These are best explained with analogies:

The Menu Problem – How content gets conceived and planned

The Sausage Problem – How content gets made and delivered

The Menu Problem
Marketers don’t have much experience running editorial organizations. This is best reflected in the low percentage of marketers who report that they follow a content marketing strategy.[iii]

A strategy is necessary.[iv] And no one is taking the responsibility to make one.

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More On New Video Consumption Behaviors

Jim Nail

The press coverage of my report "Making Sense of New Video Consumption Behaviors" -- and especially the number they highlighted that 46% of the "core" TV audience watches linear TV in a typical month -- raised a lot of questions (and skepticism!) on the Research Wonks list serve. I figure if they had those questions, others might, too, so here is the response I posted there:

"The media always looks for the headline-grabbing, shocking, number and the 46% watch linear certainly qualifies. I used this number in passing to set up the report so before I address the methodology questions, let me share the core conclusion of the report: consumer video consumption behaviors are different enough across generations that planners need to break out of past planning routines and account for these different behaviors. Toward the end of the report I say:

A goal of 100 gross rating points (GRPs) against an 18-to-49 audience is merely an average across this entire audience; if the placements are skewed to linear TV, it will likely deliver too many ads to the 35-to-49 segment and not deliver enough to the 18-to-34 group.

The 46% number doesn't comment on the number of hours, and the data we capture is very broad here, but even it shows that linear is still the larger number of hours.

In the report I say that linear is the “main dish” that must be complemented with “side dishes” like streamed sources and addressable plus “desserts” like professional short-form video to present a balanced video ad diet. (Yes, I really tortured that metaphor!)

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How To Win A Forrester Groundswell Award For Social Reach Marketing

Nate Elliott

We’re now accepting entries for the 2015 Forrester Groundswell Awards. This is our chance to recognize the very best social marketing programs from the past year, and we’d love to give an award to you for your best work. Our deadline for entries is February 20, 2015.

My favorite category is Social Reach Marketing — where we celebrate the best word-of-mouth and social advertising programs. If you used social media to reach new audiences and generated awareness, this is the category for you.

So what’s the key to winning a Forrester Groundswell Award for Social Reach Marketing? It’s not just a question of whether your word-of-mouth program or your social ads reached lots of people — you need to prove your efforts had a business impact on the people they reached.

Our 2014 winners in this category offer perfect examples:

  • B2C Social Reach winner Morningstar Farms increased favorability, trial, and intent to purchase. MorningStar Farms wanted to introduce its meat-free products to new audiences — a classic use case for social reach marketing. So they worked with House Party, Inc. to identify 3,000 influencers and sent them a "party pack" so they could host meat-free barbecues for friends and family. The social activity around the barbecues created a further 29 million impressions that reached 10 million people. But this program didn’t win an award just because it had big reach — it won because that big reach moved people closer to the point of purchase. Specifically, the parties themselves generated 128,000 trials of MorningStar Farms products, and the brand saw a 40-point lift in favorability and purchase intent from partygoers.
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Is Your TV Advertising Plan Like Tuna Noodle Casserole?

Jim Nail

Even when I was a kid, tuna noodle casserole was a bit outdated, a relic of the 1950s, when recipes on the side of a soup can were considered cuisine. But if your TV plan is heavily reliant on linear TV, it's a lot like that casserole: not appealing to younger viewers whose tastes are more diverse.

I certainly read a lot about how Millennials are leading the growth of streamed TV viewing, and I've seen the occasional stat to back it up. It certainly makes sense. But I decided to dig into Forrester's Consumer Technographics® data to flesh out the picture in this report which was just published: Making Sense of New Video Consumption Behavior.

No surprise; the numbers support the generally accepted wisdom of Millennials being the ones most eagerly adopting new ways to view favorite shows: 34% of Millennials (i.e., 18-to-34-year-olds) report watching 4 hours or more of TV online weekly versus only 12% of Gen Xers (ages 35 to 48) and Younger Boomers (ages 49 to 58). Not that Millennials have totally abandoned linear: 55% still watch 4+ hours weekly compared with 73% of the older segments. But clearly, their video diet is more diverse.

The report also confirms that clips and short form content are more popular on mobile devices than full-lengths shows. 

So now we've confirmed what people have suspected all along . . .

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