GoPro Lets Us Share Our Most Exciting Mobile Moments

Julie Ask

Why do we use Facebook on our mobile phones? Because when we are out and about doing something fun, we want to tell our friends about it.

If I were posting from home, my posts would be:

“I am working.”

“I am watching TV.”

“The cat just sat on my laptop.”

“My cat just knocked over my water cup.”

Yawn. Boring. It is much more exciting to post updates to our friends about the latest sashimi we’ve eaten or the last run we skied on Val d’Isere. These are the mobile moments we want to share with our friends. This is part of the mobile mind shift, the expectation that we can get what we want, in our immediate context and moment of need.

GoPro takes the capture and sharing of mobile moments to new heights. We (yes my family owns one) not only use our GoPro at cool, exciting outdoor places like Yosemite and Tofino to capture HD images, but also use it when we are in motion – fast motion down hills on skis, snowboards, and bikes, or in the water.

But rather than waiting until the day’s adventure has ended, GoPro enables the consumer to share these moments in context with friends and family, thanks to wifi enabled cameras and the GoPro mobile app. It’s immediate proof and boasting rights for some of the most exciting mobile moments.

Here’s one of my favorite mobile moments GoPro has enabled:

What is it like to free fall from a space capsule?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9CsZMsIgRU

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What Does Acxiom's $310M LiveRamp Bid Mean For Marketers?

Fatemeh Khatibloo

On May 14, Acxiom announced its intention to acquire LiveRamp, a "data onboarding service," to the tune of $310 million in cash. Several Forrester analysts (Tina Moffett, Susan Bidel, Sri Sridharan, and I) cover these two firms, and what follows is our collective thinking on the impending acquisition after having been briefed by Acxiom's leadership on the matter.

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Look Beyond The Obvious When Considering Social Login

Kim Celestre

Chances are, you have recently registered on a brand’s website or community page and were prompted to use your social network credentials. Perhaps you (reluctantly) used your Facebook login because it’s easy to remember — or it made the registration process a little less painful. 

Personally, I am finding that I am using my Facebook or LinkedIn social credentials more frequently. Just the other day, I used my Facebook login to access the scheduling tool for my favorite barre studio. I use social login out of laziness (its easier) or because my memory is maxed out on user names and passwords. But the more comfortable I get using my social network credentials, the more information I will allow the brand to access — especially if it’s a brand I trust.

And I am not alone. According to this study, over half of the 90% of consumers who encounter social login use it. And for some websites, that percentage is as high as over 80%.

So if consumers are using their social network credentials, why are marketers lagging behind? Many marketers I speak with do not think about social login as a key component of their social marketing strategy. They understand the obvious benefits like faster and easier registration, but they struggle to see social login’s potential as a complement to their social marketing strategy.

And the adoption percentages reflect this. Social login is the least-adopted social depth tactic by digital marketers:

 

 

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Why You Should Read The Mobile Mind Shift

Josh Bernoff

Worldwide, people use mobile devices pretty much continuously. Mobile access on smartphones and tablets creates a dramatic change in behavior as people use, then expect, and then demand service from every entity they deal with. This is the mobile mind shift:

The mobile mind shift is the expectation that I can get what I want in my immediate context and moments of need.
 
Despite this complete transformation in expectations, companies typically have no idea what to do about it. "I guess we should build an app," they tell us. Instead, this transformation demands a complete rethink of the way they do business. Business competition has now focused down to the mobile moment — the point in time and space when someone pulls out a mobile device to get what he or she wants immediately, in context. Win in that moment, and you have his or her loyalty. Fail to be there, or screw it up, and an entrepreneur will do a better job and steal your customer. 
 
Getting mobile right will require you to change how you see customers, your relationship with those customers, and (the expensive part) the platforms, people, and processes that power those systems. When mobile engagement fails, it's usually because companies didn't recognize the scope of what they need to get that mobile moment right. They need a mobile mind shift of their own.
 
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The State Of VoC Programs, 2014

Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian

Voice of the customer (VoC) programs play a critical role in improving customer experience. They gather data for customer experience (CX) measurement efforts and uncover insights that help improve customer understanding.

To assess the state of VoC programs, we asked companies how long their VoC program has been in place, how valuable the program is to drive CX improvements and deliver financial results, how the program governance works, and if it is supported by VoC consulting and technology vendors. And we asked participants to rate their program’s capabilities on the four key tasks of VoC programs — listen, interpret, react, and monitor.

Here are some highlights of what we found:

  • Most VoC programs have been around for three or more years, are run or coordinated by a central team, and consist of fewer than five full-time employees. Many also turn to outside vendors for help.
  • But VoC programs are still not taken as seriously as other programs in an organization: They improve customer experience but struggle to deliver financial results. And they aren’t embedded enough in the organization. The good news is that many have some executive support, but they lack the resources they need and aren’t fully embraced by employees.
  • For VoC capabilities, we found that VoC programs are still better at listening than at acting on the insights they find.
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Sneak Preview: The Latest On The Customer Experience Ecosystem

Rick Parrish

When Forrester first introduced the customer experience (CX) ecosystem concept three years ago, we found that companies’ attempts to innovate their CX were limited by tunnel vision. They couldn’t see beyond the surface layer of individual touchpoints to understand the intricate web of behind-the-scenes dynamics that really create the customer experience.

To update our research on the CX ecosystem, I’ve spent the past few months conducting dozens of interviews with senior executives from a range of industries. I’ll reveal my complete findings at our Forum For Customer Experience Professionals East next month, but I’d like to start the conversation here by sharing one piece of good news: Companies are starting to get it — at least theoretically. Most companies now understand that interactions deep within their own organizations and outside their borders determine the quality of all customer interactions.

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The Data Digest: Do Mobile Phones Make Us More Productive?

Anjali Lai

In the early 1900s, author Kin Hubbard said, “A bee is never as busy as it seems; it’s just that it can’t buzz any slower.” A century later, things haven’t changed much — except that today, those bees are us and that buzzing comes from our mobile phones.

Survey data tells us that consumers regard their mobile phones as catalysts for productivity. Considering the amount of time consumers spend using the device and how essential they characterize the technology to be, it’s easy to take their word for it. But not so fast: Mobile tracking metrics show that consumers rarely ever conduct productivity-related tasks on their devices. In fact, the official US productivity rate has dropped to its lowest point in the past two decades.

In this case, the conflicting data points are not wrong, they are complementary — and the resulting insight is even more valuable than the sum of its parts. A combination of Forrester’s Consumer Technographics® data, mobile tracking numbers, and ConsumerVoices output reveals that consumers engage far less frequently in productive behaviors than expected — and suggests a new understanding of what “mobile productivity” really means.

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The Forrester Wave™: Web Analytics, Q2 2014 Shows That Web Analytics Is More Important Than Ever

James McCormick

At Forrester we have talked about the fact that digital intelligence has replaced web analytics.  Digital intelligence tackles emerging channels, sophisticated consumers, technical challenges, and the enterprise democratization of digital analytics.  Achieving this requires a technology toolkit which far outstrips the data, analytics and action remit of even the top web analytics tools.  Does that mean we throw away web analytics?  Absolutely not!  Forrester’s most recent research shows that web analytics remains relevant even as digital intelligence strategies mature because top vendors are:

  • Extending the capabilities of their web analytics tools to collect and ingest multiple on and offline data sources and democratizing insights and discovery by improving usability and support of sophisticated data and analytics techniques.  
  • Supporting other processes, systems and tools within the digital intelligence toolkit which provides actionably (e.g testing, behavioral  targeting, etc.) by making web analytics data and insights available to these systems – in real time.

Don’t throw away web analytics; use it as a starting point and cornerstone for your firm’s digital intelligence journey.

Check the recent Forrester Wave™: Web Analytics, Q2 2014 wave report to get further insight as to how enterprise web analytics vendors have advanced their products to support digital intelligence.

Make More Persuasive Infographics By Balancing Context With Simplicity

Ryan Morrill

A colleague shared a recent Harvard Business Review article with me after I mentioned seeing The Best American Infographics on display in my local bookstore. The article was a brief interview with the series editor, Gareth Cook, and covered some of his thoughts on what makes a great infographic.

If there was one overall theme, it would be persuasiveness. In fact, this was presented as self-evident — an almost inherent quality of any great infographic — so the interview primarily focused on what makes an infographic persuasive.

“First, I’d say, they all have a clear focus. The designer has gone in and removed all the extraneous details so you see just what you need to understand the message behind it.”

I couldn’t agree more. In my own graphics, I am constantly trying to simplify and boil them down to the essential elements — from the text and layout to the colors and icons — that help make the point of the graphic clear.

But in the process of simplifying my graphics, I have sometimes found myself approaching a line — and it’s one that you do not want to cross — after which the graphic is too simple, lacks sufficient context, and loses all its weight. For example, I’ve simplified the pie chart below and used color to help emphasize the point of the graphic.

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Mobile Moments Change Everything — Check Out #MyMobileMoment And Add Your Own

Josh Bernoff

Stop thinking in terms of what you do, or how your technology works now. Start thinking in terms of the mobile moments of your customers.

A mobile moment is a point in time and space when someone pulls out a mobile device to get what he or she wants immediately, in context.

Thinking in terms of mobile moments is the lesson of our new book, The Mobile Mind Shift. It's a new way of thinking for many companies, but it's essential to getting mobile strategy right. Without it, you end up spending a lot of effort on features your customers won't use. Meanwhile, some entreprenuer like Lose It! or Roambi swoops in and steals your mobile moments.
 
How pervasive are mobile moments? We started a hashtag campaign on #MyMobileMoment to encourage people to share the mobile moments. Go ahead, check out the hundreds of posts so far. Or post your own.

Here are few revealing posts we've seen:

Mobile is there in a moment of crisis.

And in the second-grade spelling homework.

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