Innovation Agency Wave: Learn more about the 10 agencies driving innovation

Sarah Sikowitz

I am very excited to announce that the Innovation Agency Wave is now live! 

Marketers need data, technology support, ideas, experience design, and change management — not just channel expertise — in order to differentiate themselves in the age of the customer. To accommodate, agencies are redefining their core competencies to better align with three areas of marketers' demandinnovation around products and business models, integration of channels and customer data, and implementation of enabling technology systems.

This research reminded us that "innovation agency" is a label that Forrester assigned to agencies with specific aptitudes. Most agencies don't have neatly packaged innovation offerings. But those we reviewed do offer strategy, change management, customer experience, and design and development services — capabilities that are core to enabling digital business innovation. Since CMOs may not find a standard blueprint for an innovation agency, this wave provides guidance as you review potential innovation agency partners. 

In addition to the report, please make sure to download the interactive scorecard tool to build your custom wave and gain a more in depth look at each agency.

I’d like to extend a huge thank you to all of the agencies that participated.  The teams that I worked with are all so talented and put in a lot of time and effort, which I appreciate. 

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The Data Digest: Don’t Lose Potential Mobile Moments By Neglecting Information Workers

Christopher Kelley

With evolving bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trends and the prevalence of consumer mobility captured by the Mobile Mind Shift Index, the lines between personal and work mobility have blurred. I see this every day that I take the train to work, watching information workers seamlessly shift from Candy Crush Saga to their work email on their mobile devices.

For years, Forrester has measured consumers’ use of technology in their personal lives and their work through its Consumer and Business Technographics® surveys. This year, we began to address the intersection of these spheres, comparing a worker’s relative mobility at home with their mobility at work. Specifically, we analyzed the extent to which information workers across 10 countries use mobile devices at work and at home, leading to four segments based on their relative mobility in each sphere:

This analysis found that nearly one-third of global information workers fall into two segments: the Mobile-Compelled – high mobility at work but not in their personal life; and the Mobile-Ready – high mobility in their personal life but not at home. This highlights how mobility at home does not automatically translate to mobility at work.

This mobility mismatch has big implications in the age of the customer. For example:

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Increase Key Account Revenue With Better Process and Technologies

Mark Lindwall

As sales forces in many organizations face a busy fiscal year-end, they are also planning for how to grow revenues in 2015.  I’ve been working with clients who are looking for insights and ideas on how to increase their revenue footprint in their key accounts next year.  In our discussions, we often discover that their organizations lack comprehensive understanding of where untapped opportunity resides in accounts – for example in other departments, divisions or business units, or other geographies.  They also determine that they have operational barriers that inhibit sales teams from collaborating with each other to add more value to their customers.  If you believe that your firm has untapped opportunities to better serve your customers across additional departments, business units, or geographies, now is the time to take action. But where should you start?

First, Figure Out Who Needs To Be Involved

To ensure that you maximize the potential of your key accounts, you need the participation of people beyond just your sales reps. To get this right, you need leaders from sales, sales operations, marketing, and potentially product groups and your tech management team, as well as front line sales teams, to come together to inventory your current key account presence or penetration.

Next, Ensure Your Sales Force Has Accurate Information . . .

To help your sales force plan and execute their key account growth strategies, you’ll need to ensure that they have accurate information about the legal and financial structure of accounts. Providers like Dun & Bradstreet utilize established legal and financial organizing structures (i.e., SEC) and data to gain accurate visibility into the legal, financial, and organizational structures of your accounts, as well as contact information.

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Is your company moving beyond surveys when measuring customer experience? I’d love to include you in my new research

Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian

CX professionals rely on surveys a great deal to measure customer experience. That’s because surveys have their advantages but they have limits, too.

If your company has taken steps to move beyond surveys to measure customer experience, I'd love to hear your opinions, experiences and advice for my new research on “CX Measurement – Beyond Surveys”. Goal of this research is to share what companies do to measure customer experience in addition to surveys, which approaches are most promising and which challenges companies face doing that.

Your insights are appreciated, so if you would like to share your story (on or off the record), please contact me at: mschmidt@forrester.com

Looking forward to speaking with you.

Want to Drive Action With Your VoC Program? Cater to Your Internal Customers!

Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian

In our latest survey on the state of the art of VoC programs, 71 percent of respondents said their VoC program was not fully or mostly effective in driving actions. That's jarring. No matter how much effort you put into collecting VoC, the insights are still only as good as what stakeholders in the company do with them.

As a VoC program owner, you therefore need to get better at leveraging your internal customers so they drive the action required to improve customer experience and your bottom line. This is what my new report "How To Drive Action In VoC Programs" is all about.

First, you have to figure out your internal audiences. Some are more in tune to the VoC than others. Your audience often falls into three categories:

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More Trends in Brazil’s eCommerce Market

Zia Daniell Wigder

eCommerce in Brazil has gone from an $8 billion market in 2010 to a nearly $20 billion market today.  As the market has grown, eCommerce team sizes have expanded and retailers’ priorities have shifted. We address these issues in the second of our three-part series on retail eCommerce in Brazil. The three reports summarize the findings of a survey we fielded of over 300 online retailers in Brazil together with partner e-Commerce Brasil.

In our most recent report entitled Retail eCommerce In Brazil: Team Headcount, Priorities And Challenges, we find that:

Operations has the highest headcount while analytics and customer experience lag far behind. Our survey shows that the average eCommerce team in Brazil has 24 members, with half of those being part of the operations team. Customer service, IT and marketing fall further down the list. eCommerce teams include just two people in usability/customer experience and just one in analytics.

Hiring qualified talent remains many online retailers’ largest hurdle. When asked about challenges, retailers cited hiring as one of their biggest issues over the next 12 months. Not surprisingly, the two areas of low headcount cited above – customer experience and analytics – are two of the most challenging positions to hire for in other markets, as well. The other top challenge cited by Brazilian retailers was managing fulfillment costs and expectations – not surprising given Brazilian shoppers’ expectations of free, quick delivery in major metropolitan areas. 

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US Cab Companies: To Beat uberX, Improve Your CX

Harley Manning

About two years ago I stopped taking cabs from my home in the suburbs of Boston to Boston’s Logan airport. I wasn’t drawn away by uberX; my local cab company pushed me away with its awful customer experience.

Here’s what happened: When I first started using my local cab company years ago, I’d call for pick up and a clean cab that seemed well maintained would arrive at the requested time, driven by a polite, professional cabbie. The price of the ride seemed fair. 

Over time the cabs that came to pick me up got dirtier and dirtier, and the drivers looked sketchier and sketchier – even as the price went up until it was close to that of a car service.

The last straw was when my driver – a woman of indeterminate age wearing cutoffs, sandals, and a tank top – showed up late in a filthy cab that I didn’t want to get into while wearing a suit (sadly, I didn’t have much choice at that point unless I wanted to miss my flight). All the way to the airport all she talked about was how she was qualified for better jobs than driving a cab but that she kept getting fired from those jobs unfairly.

Really? I’m paying you to drive me while you tell me how you’re too good to drive me? If you can’t take pride in your work – like a cabbie in London or Tokyo would, and cabbies in the US used to do – then at least spare me (your customer) the endless stream of complaints.

To be clear, I wasn’t expecting white glove service. My requirements were pretty minimal: Show up on time in a clean cab, don’t dress in a way that makes me wonder whether you stole the cab, get me to my destination without acting like a lunatic, and charge me a reasonable price for your services. That’s a pretty low bar.

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Digital Media Buying Gets The "Programmatic" Makeover

If you are, like me,  deeply involved with digital advertising, one of the industry mantras of the last few years was anything with a taste of “PROGRAMMATIC.”

Yes, you can say it with me now: “PRO·GRAM·MAT·IC.” Ahhhh. 

In reality, I think that we are only starting now to truly see programmatic methods and techniques adopted by ad sellers and buyers. Finally, in 2014 we have seen marketing leaders driving their digital media buying practices forward by combining rich customer data with algorithmically driven buying platforms to make digital advertising dollars more effective in reaching target audiences. And, while there is a long road ahead of us before the robots become self-aware, there are some key trends shaping the industry that point to a more sophisticated future for media buying:

1)      Budget increases - Major brands and massive holding companies have huge goals for programmatic spending. With P&G striving to buy 70% to 75% of digital ads programmatically by the end of the year, Google striving for 60% of digital marketing budget on programmatic, and what seems like an arms race amongst the holding companies to see who can spend more programmatically, the future of software-driven media buying looks bright.   

2)      Growth in TV-land - As marketing leaders have started to up the ante for programmatic, sellers have taken notice, specifically across video and TV. The buzz about programmatic TV is taking hold, and we are seeing a new generation of ad tech commit to solving that problem for advertisers.

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Which Banks Lead In Digital Sales? Find Out Here

Peter Wannemacher

[This blog post was co-authored by Rachel Roizen]

Hot off the presses: We’ve just published our 2014 US and Canadian Bank Digital Sales Benchmark reports, in which we assess the public websites of the five largest retail banks in each country — as well as their mobile sites and downloadable apps for smartphones and tablets. Our benchmark looks at a range of criteria across four categories: discover, explore, buy, and onboard (see image below).

Read the full reports by clicking on the following links:

                      

Here are some of the findings from the research:

  • Bank of America narrowly edges out the competition to take the top US spot. For the second year in a row, Bank of America earns the highest overall score among the five largest retail banks. The firm excels by simplifying the online application process (it takes just a few minutes and guides the user with clear feedback and progress indicators) while supporting digital shoppers with chat and click-to-call options. At the same time, Bank of America enables easy cross-channel shopping for digital researchers who want to move offline to apply, with branch appointment scheduling available online.
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Native Ads: A Thing of the Past (and Future)

The term "selfie" entered our lexicon only recently, thanks to the ease with which they can be taken and distributed via cell phones and mobile data connections. But the practice of taking a photo of oneself is decidedly not a new phenomenon.

Last week, I did something I don't often find myself doing: I watched live TV. I landed on The Voice for a while and caught a Nissan commercial/music video featuring the contestants on the show. This reminded me of the similar ads American Idol used to produce with Ford. While my friend had a visceral reaction to the ad ("It doesn't make me want to buy a Nissan"), I spent less time extolling the virtues and necessity of branding and more time thinking about what these ads are: they're native.

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