How To Implement The Customer Experience Advice In The US Digital Services Playbook

Rick Parrish

A few weeks ago, I advised federal agencies to build better digital customer experiences. I had no idea how polarizing the post would be, so I’d like to return to the topic of digital customer experience (CX) again this week.

Even the US Digital Service (USDS) thinks federal agencies need better digital CX. Last year, the USDS published a US Digital Services Playbook, a series of 13 plays to help federal CIOs create better digital customer experiences. (The playbook would work equally for agencies’ digital services teams, if they ever get funded.)

Notably, the Playbook doesn’t open with CIO staples like cloud services or automated testing or procurement. It starts with four CX plays that remind federal CIOs to begin every project with an outside-in customer-centric perspective.

These four CX plays are good advice. Federal CIOs who follow them will produce measurably better CX. That's because these guidelines, which are drawn from basic but proven best practices, correctly advise CIOs to:

  • "Understand what people need." Play No. 1 challenges CIOs to think from the outside in by putting "the needs of people" before the "constraints of government structures or silos" when designing new experiences. This guidance provides federal CIOs with the mandate they need to push back against rigid organizations and complex regulations that paralyze CX improvement efforts.
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For The Third Time In Three Years, Forrester’s UK Mobile Banking Benchmark Has A New Leader

Oliwia Berdak

[This is a guest blog by Alexander Causey]

In 2013 NatWest led the way. Last year Barclays overtook having introduced a range of new app functionality, including being the first in the UK to introduce a digital vault (Barclays Cloud It). And now in our latest report we found Lloyds Bank to have jumped ahead of them both.

Forrester’s 2015 UK Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark was published yesterday and reveals our insights around the state of the UK mobile banking, based on reviews of Barclays, HSBC, Lloyds Bank, Nationwide Building Society, and NatWest.

Lloyds Bank has pulled ahead of its peers with more extensive account management and transactional features. It remains the only bank in the UK which we reviewed that lets customers add a new payee directly in the app. If I’m out and about and need to pay back my friend for some tickets, I don’t want to have to wait until I get home to add a new payee through my online banking (yes, yes I know…we could use Paym to make a P2P payment but for the sake of this argument, let’s say these are very expensive tickets). I want to be able to add a new payee and send the money then and there - in my mobile moment.

Lloyds Bank is also making strides through its Everyday Offers. By partnering with Cardlytics, the Lloyds Bank app presents customers with relevant cash-back offers based on their past transaction history.

That’s not to say that the other banks are not doing great things. One of my favorite features is Nationwide’s Quick Balance, which lets customers view their account balance in just one click and without the need to login.

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Can Your Organization Build A Customer Experience To Rival The Cloud-Based Upstarts?

TJ Keitt

The cloud is not just reshaping how companies provision technology; it's changing customers' experience. A technology platform that is easily scalable for and accessible to the billions of connected devices customers use — PCs, smartphones, tablets, TVs, cars, jet engines, and more — has allowed cloud-services companies to completely reinvent experiences. No one was using black-car drivers' idle time to disrupt the taxi industry on a mass scale prior to Uber. Millions of customers, both consumers and business clients, have flocked to these cloud services, believing these are better experiences. The proof? The cloud computing elder Amazon is a perennial leader in Forrester's Customer Experience Index and has a market capitalization of more than $200 billion. So, the question you're probably asking is, "Does this mean that we need to build our customer interaction points in the cloud?"

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Selling Digital Goods Or Online Services Requires A Flexible Commerce Platform

Lily Varon

Consumers and enterprises alike are increasingly shying away from buying digital content, services, and software outright. Instead, these businesses are embracing alternative business models where they lease or rent access to digital products and services. The disruption to traditional business models is widespread and accelerating across all verticals of digital product distribution, with high profile digital disruptors like Adobe, Netflix, and Salesforce driving changes in the way consumers and enterprises pay for, and engage with, digital products.

Today we see that:

  • Business model changes are accelerating in the digital goods marketplace. Today's digitally connected consumer is increasingly eschewing the traditional ownership model of buy, download, install, and use. Consumers want access to digital content and services across their connected devices, anytime, anywhere — and are embracing virtual ownership models that provide access to vast libraries of content, services, and products under subscription, usage, and other emerging ownership models.
  • A different set of features and services are fundamental for digital goods sellers. Many of the features and capabilities found in enterprise eCommerce platforms are directly transferrable to selling digital goods or online services. However, most of these retail-focused solutions lack the unique features and services needed to sell digital products and services online, including flexible cross selling and bundling, asset protection, subscription management and entitlements among other features.
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Scotiabank Uses Mobile Messaging To Increase Digital Sales

Peter Wannemacher

[Note: This blog post is based on a new Forrester research report; clients can read the full text here.] 

Two years ago, digital executives at Scotiabank looked at the state of mobile banking and recognized the opportunity to roll out targeted mobile marketing to existing customers using the firm's mobile apps. At the time, too few banks were leveraging mobile as a marketing, sales, and cross-selling touchpoint — a problem that is still evident among US banks.

But rather than simply throwing random banner ads at mobile banking users, the digital team at Scotiabank opted to take a targeted approach that served up relevant offers in the user's context, made the "buy" task flow as convenient as possible, and put the bank in position to expand the effort in future years.

As a result, digital executives at Scotiabank have seen mobile cross-selling rates — as measured by year-over-year growth in unit sales via mobile banking — more than double, up 165% since the firm launched this effort.

Scotiabank’s mobile cross-selling initiative is just one example of a brand embracing the idea of mobile moments. Forrester’s wider research shows that mobile moments are becoming a major battlefield in banks’ efforts to win, serve, and retain customers.

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CX Interview On Simplicity With Mark McCormick Of Wells Fargo

Allegra Burnette

Mark McCormick, newly in the position of head of user experience for wholesale Internet services at Wells Fargo, has led customer experience teams for 20 years, the past 12 of which have been at Wells Fargo. He specializes in managing large research, design, and content strategy teams and driving cultural values and practices around customer centricity, innovation, and, lately, simplicity. We sat down to talk more about simplicity leading up to Mark’s keynote at CXNYC 2015

Photo of Mark McCormickQ: You’ll be speaking about ethnographic research at the CXNYC 2015 Forum. Could you give us some background on the role of research at Wells Fargo, particularly as it relates to design?

A: Ethnography is an enabler to design and decision-making. Design and research have always gone hand in glove at Wells Fargo, usually reporting to the same manager and working in tandem on projects. But when I talk about research, I’m referring to a few different kinds of research. In the case of usability, there needs to be a bit of a wall between the designers and research in order to maintain the objectivity that’s needed. With ethnography on the other hand, ideally you would have designers, executives, and product teams all in the field, side by side with researchers. With that kind of research, and with the rich qualitative data that comes out of it, it is extremely fruitful if you get designers and researchers parsing the data together. Then everyone has a stake in it, and if they have a stake in the data, they end up using it.

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Federal Agencies Must Treat Customer Experience As A Business Discipline

Rick Parrish

By now we all know that federal customer experience (CX) is disastrously weak and that improving it will boost both agency operations and the health of the political system.

We’ve also seen some pockets of hope popping up, as I predicted a few months ago. For instance: The Department of Education’s new portal is complete, the Department of Veterans Affairs My HealtheVet site now offers online tracking for mail-order prescriptions, and BusinessUSA.gov combines thousands of pieces of information from several federal agencies into a single site for entrepreneurs and business owners. Other improvements are still in the works, like 18F's upgrade of the Department of the Treasury's My Retirement Account website and the Office of Personnel Management Innovation Lab's redesign of USAJobs.gov.

These isolated projects are good, but not good enough. It’s time for federal agencies to get beyond one-off tech tasks and the find-and-fix mentality to truly institutionalize CX improvement throughout their organizations. And that means treating CX not as a sideshow, but as a real business discipline. To do this, agencies must systematically perform the practices associated with all six CX disciplines — strategy, customer understanding, design, measurement, governance, and culture. Right now, federal agencies are failing in all of these areas.

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The Data Digest: The Value Of Company Values

Anjali Lai

We are notoriously bad at knowing ourselves. Science shows that we are not quite as beautiful, or smart, or ethical as we would like to think. As a result, our self-proclaimed beliefs do not always translate into action; often, we say we’ll do “the right thing” but (consciously or not) we’ll proceed to do the opposite. Are we really nothing more than delusional creatures of habit bound to repeat our mistakes? No – actually, far from it. Certain individuals are hyperaware of their values and follow through on decisions and actions accordingly. Although a small group, these consumers spark awareness, change their behavior, demand transparency, and inspire trends.

My latest report examines what, when, and why consumers buy, when values are central to their decision-making process. In my research, I found that, despite limited knowledge and patterns of self-deceit, consumers want to purchase from companies that embrace ethical practices. More broadly, consumers are becoming increasingly aware of company values and are opening their wallets when company values resonate with theirs:

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How To Measure The Customer Impact Of CX Projects — And Get Them Funded

Sam Stern

No one disputes that treating customers well is the right thing to do: Virtually all respondents in a Forrester survey of CX professionals said that executives at their companies consider customer impact to be at least somewhat important when making business decisions. But compared with hard return on investment (ROI) numbers in business cases for other initiatives, CX projects won't get needed funding if their estimated returns are limited to benefits like improved satisfaction or higher Net Promoter Score (NPS).

In my latest report, "How To Measure The Impact Of CX Projects — And Get Them Funded," I describe a four-step process companies should adopt to govern CX improvement initiatives and help ensure their projects can win funding.

  • Step 1: Prioritize customer experience improvement opportunities. Most companies are spoiled for choice when it comes to finding parts of the experience to improve. But all that choice can be debilitating when trying to decide how to best allocate scarce resources and small budgets. Core customer experience activities like collecting insights from customers and employees and mapping customer journeys are valuable in this step to help companies identify the improvement projects that will have the greatest CX impact.
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No Big Bank Leads In US Mobile Banking

Rachel Roizen

[this blog post was co-authored by Peter Wannemacher]

Forrester has just published its 2015 US Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark. The report reveals important insights about the mobile offerings from the five largest retail banks in the US: Bank of America, Chase, Citi, U.S. Bank, and Wells Fargo. Forrester clients can find the full benchmark report here:

All of these bank brands are relatively strong, providing customers with the services and functionality they’ve come to expect from mobile apps and sites. But perhaps the most significant takeaway from our research is that no single bank is leading: When it comes to mobile, the big US banks are achieving parity, not breakthrough.

  • Overall, the US banks are meeting customer’s needs... The US banks achieved overall scores of 65 or higher out of 100, scoring particularly well for enabling a wide range of touchpoints and transactional features. All five banks have extensive functionality across bill pay transfers and P2P payments, like mobile remote deposit capture and adding a payee from within the app.  
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