Retailers Focus on Multiple Holiday Sales Driving Tactics, in Addition to Search

Patti Freeman Evans

According to the 2008 JupiterResearch Executive Survey results, online retailers continue to put search engine marketing spending at the top of their holiday sales driving tactics. Nonetheless, this trend is more subdued when compared to previous years. The JupiterResearch US Paid Search Forecast, 2008 to 2013 notes that paid search will grow 26 percent in 2008 (to $11.4 billion) and continue at a compound annual growth rate of 13 percent, however attention is starting to shift from paid search to more aggressive search engine optimization (SEO) campaigns.

15 percent less online retailers cite increasing their search engine marketing spending for the holiday season among the top three sales-driving tactics. According to the 2008 JupiterResearch Retail Executive Survey, 40 percent of online retailers will increase search marketing spending as a holiday sales-driving tactic this year. Though a high overall total percentage, this is still 15 points less retailers than the previous year. Online retailers already spend 40 percent of their budgets on search, thus the slowing of this spending increase signals a wider focus on other tactics.

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What Do You Say When the CEO Asks "What Do I Get For My Investment in Sales Enablement?"

Scott Santucci

Sales_crystal_ball When your CEO asks, "Why haven't we realized the sales performance boosts we expected when we (insert investment of your choice)

...implemented our SFA system?
...trained our sales organization?
...launched our sales portal?"

How will you respond?

If you (and the CEO) thought that investment was "the answer" to improving sales performance, we have some bad news. There is no such thing as a sales effectiveness silver bullet.

While, there are many different types of organizations that claim they can help you improve your sales productivity, few of these solutions can offer measurable gains in productivity on their own. For example:

•CRM vendors argue that implementing their software will help you drive more business by providing better structure to the sales process and improving the accuracy of your forecasting.
•Sales training firms suggest that you can improve your sales fundamentals by teaching a common sales methodology and best practices.
•Market intelligence firms claim that better and more up-to-date information about market trends and your competitors' actions will do the trick.

However, companies that have implemented these solutions report that they are not realizing the desired impact of these investments.

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Will B2B Marketing Become Obsolete? (Part II)

Laura Ramos

Lauraramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

Wow.  I am overwhelmed by the response I received from my first post on this subject. Looks like I hit a nerve and inspired some great commentary.  In particular, I'd like to call attention to the thoughful response from Arthur Einstein, who is the VP of Marketing at Loyalty Builders. I wanted to comment briefly on what I am hearing from all of you so far. To avoid obsolescence, readers believe B2B marketers must focus on:

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Will B2B Marketing Become Obsolete? (Part I)

Laura Ramos

Lauraramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

Today marks the beginning of my 8th year at Forrester and my 4th year researching B2B marketing.

I’d like to use this anniversary to start a blog conversation about what I see happening in B2B marketing and to think about what’s next. And, frankly, I am concerned about the future of the business marketing profession.  In particular, for those of us marketing high technology products and services.

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Interactive Marketing: An Imperative In A Recession

Shar VanBoskirk

[Posted by Shar VanBoskirk]

***Updated with new registration information***

With an economic crisis looming, marketers must find new means to cut costs and deliver returns.  Many interactive marketing tools can actually provide cost-effective ways for firms to increase sales and deepen customer relationships. 

I hope you will join me for a  complimentary Webinar where we discuss how interactive marketing can help you battle budget cuts or slagging sales due to the slowing economy.  In this Webinar, I'm planning to define how interactive marketing should be a mandate for all marketers to stay relevant to their end consumers.  I'm also going to tackle why interactive marketing matters, how your firm should approach it and how Forrester can help you craft meaningful interactive marketing strategies.

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Japan & Korea prefer anonymous social computing

Jonathan Browne

Chang-Won Kim reports that Korea's top actress, Jin-sil Choi, has just taken her own life. It seems that she was deeply hurt by anonymous comments leveled at her online:

Chang makes the point that social media need a more robust system of identity and reputation to support online interaction -- so that communities have ways to freeze out irresponsible and hateful individuals.

I think this is a particularly serious issue in countries like Korea and Japan. In these countries, where "real life" society is quite buttoned up, people turn to online forums to let off steam anonymously. For example, Japan's social networks (such as Mixi) tend to be anonymous and the most famous bulletin board, 2-channel is full of posts under the identity "No Name". Many Japanese people feel that this anonymity protects their privacy and liberates them to say what they really think.

I remember a conversation that I had a few months ago with a Japanese technology blogger who hides his "real life" identity. His technology blogging struck me as inoffensive (and brilliant), so I couldn't understand why he asks people to refrain from taking his photograph and why he dons a disguise before making a speech in public. (It sounds like a comedy about the mafia... right?) He told me that he feels a need to stay anonymous, even for his politically neutral blog.

I wonder if it will always be this way? I hope that more people in Japan will see the value of social media where online identities are associated with offline identities. That seems to be the surest way to ensure that people behave responsibly.

[On an unrelated note - I have heard that the email subscription software on this blog has been sending out multiple emails with the same information. I'm trying to get that fixed as soon as possible].

Reebok's "Run Easy" Creates A Movement, Not A Campaign

Shar VanBoskirk

Reebok and its agency Carat shared the details of their "Run Easy" campaign -- a multichannel effort to create a movement in running.

The situation: Reebok has strong brand recognition, but a much smaller share of sales than competitors.  Reebok wanted to create a perception that running was for everyone, not just for the elite, a very different message than competitive positioning.  Reebok also believed that to do this well, they needed to create a *movement* around running.  It wouldn't work to try to motivate people around running just with a few outbound campaigns.

The approach: Creating a movement is different than creating a campaign.  In fact, Reebok used an approach somewhat contrary to how traditional media efforts are developed.  They seeded their market with the "run easy" idea in advance of a large media blitz.  Then they used media to further interest in the idea and enroll people in the movement.  And last they spread the message through in-person events and viral elements in order to drive participation and encourage the community to spread the word on Reebok's behalf.

From my perspective the primary lessons to take away from Reebok's effort, are:

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NBC Universal Finds Olympic Investment Was Well Worth It

Shar VanBoskirk

I'm back with some details from those cases presented at the BIMA event I went to last week.

Nick Johnson the VP of Multimedia Sales for NBC Universal shared some great data and lessons learned from NBC's "ownership" of the Beijing Olympics.

He called the Olympics a cultural phenomenon -- and for more reasons than their presence in China and all of the political hullaballoo that brought about.  From a media perspective, the games brought about significant behavior change among American consumers:

76% stayed up late to watch events
48% changed their routine in order to watch events when they were on
36% delayed doing things in order to watch events

On top of the high volume of television watchers:
56 million unique users came to NBC's site to watch events, get content, see replays
NBC saw 12.3 million video downloads, AND it saw 16.4 million unique mobile users

Johnson's conclusions from the research NBC conducted following the Olympics:

1) Television can still be king.  The Olympics were hugely successful at driving a mass audience for NBC

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changes to my internet banking account

Jonathan Browne


130 pages of information from MUFG to tell me about changes to my internet banking account

Bloggers' Dinner in Tokyo - Oct 22, 2008 (Wed)

Jonathan Browne

Jeremiahowyang_5My colleague, Jeremiah Owyang is coming to Japan so we're going to have an informal, no-host bloggers' dinner on Wednesday, October 22nd in Tokyo.

Jeremiah is a senior analyst at Forrester Research. He helps interactive marketers get to grips with Social computing, Social media measurement, Web marketing, and Interactive marketing. He also writes an excellent blog of his own - Web Strategy by Jeremiah.

Our plan for the evening is that Jeremiah will talk for about 20 minutes to share some insights on trends in social computing. And then we hope to have a stimulating discussion on any topics that interest us -- in other words, all things social. No sales pitches allowed!

If you want to attend, please contact Ritsuko Tague at rtague@forrester.com with your name, company name, email address and the URL of your blog by October 3rd.

<Bloggers' Dinner in Tokyo>

Date & Time :  Wednesday, October 22nd,  19:00-21:00

Location:  FUJIMAMAS, 6-3-2 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo    MAP

Tel: 03.5485.2283

Cost:  4,000JPY - includes an Asian Tapas buffet and free bar (nomihodai).

Attendees: 20-25 bloggers

Agenda:

19:00-19:20 Jeremiah's welcome speech

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