Banks In Spain, Poland, And Turkey Are Paving The Way For Next-Generation Mobile Banking

Aurelie L'Hostis
As Europeans become more familiar with mobile banking, they use it for a growing range of banking tasks such as money transfers and bill payments. Consumers’ behavior will continue to shift as mobile experiences with retailers, airlines, and the Airbnb’s and Uber’s of this world raise expectations about what mobile apps and sites can offer and how convenient they can be to use. Customers across Europe now want access to their accounts 24/7, the ability to perform a range of transactions with only a few clicks, and the possibility to manage their finances directly on their smartphones. 
 
Yesterday we published our "2015 European Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark" report, after evaluating the mobile banking services of thirteen leading European banks. Faced with a fast-moving competitive and technology environment, digital teams at European banks have striven to keep up with customers’ rising expectations. A cluster of banks in Spain, Poland, and Turkey – CaixaBank, Bank Zachodni WBK, mBank, I┼čbank, Akbank, and Garanti – now stand out as world-class, raising the bar to deliver great customer experiences, create new value, and engage customers in their mobile moments. 
 
Here are some highlights from this research:
 
  • The European banks we reviewed offer extensive mobile transactional functionality. Turkish and Polish banks in particular make it easy for customers to pay a bill directly on mobile.
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What Do I Do With My Data?

Kara Hoisington

Part One: Don't Use A Technology Band-Aid 

While kicking off a project last October, a client showed us slide after slide of reports, architectures, and data flows. Overwhelmed by information, the client looked at us and asked — what do I do with all this data? It's a plea for help I have heard on almost every engagement since. Due to this trend, I am starting a blog series answering the question from a multitude of perspectives. Each blog will dig deeper into a particular dimension including organizational communication, analytics processes, reliance on technology, and creation of actionable data dashboards.

Clients usually start conversations thinking they need to re-evaluate their technology in order to more efficiently automate their insights-to-action process. However, after digging under the surface, this is rarely the crux of the problem. Technology is usually just the easiest target. In addition, vendors usually overpromise on what they can deliver.

Due to the marketer’s pursuit of a magic bullet to automate data into insights and insights into action, leaders enter into contracts with solution providers boasting “omnichannel” capabilities that “connect data across channels to personalize communications.” Unfortunately, technology companies rarely focus on or understand the process and organizational changes that need to happen in order to successfully leverage these capabilities.

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CX Interview On Designing The Human-Machine Interface With Parrish Hanna Of Ford Motor Company

Allegra Burnette

Parrish Hanna is the global director for human machine interface at Ford Motor. Parrish and his team guide the design and development of the interior interactive experiences for all Ford and Lincoln vehicles. Through the synthesis of emerging technologies, consumer understanding, and thoughtful physical and digital design, they ensure clarity, ease of use, meaning, value, and safety. We sat down to talk more about the role of design leading up to Parrish’s keynote at CXNYC 2015.

Q: The car is a very personal object. How do human-centered design methods fit into the context of the work that you do?

A: For me, I skipped the whole design thinking thread, because that was just always how I worked and thought — this very iterative, user-centered design being informed by qualitative and quantitative understanding, continuously doing generative, iterative, formative, and evaluative measurement while progressing through research toward understanding. But what’s interesting about our space is what resonates is actually designing for experiences through the application of science, the translation to engineering, and the emotion of design. To me, ease of use and intuitiveness and task completion are just the cost of entry. Beyond that, how do you imbue this much deeper, richer emotional connection to the brand, product, or service or to the experience itself? And for us, it’s in the context of the automotive ecosystem, which is a mobility ecosystem, compared to, say, a transactional website or a retail experience.

Q: How do you go about doing that?

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Despite Modern Marketing Improvements, Sales Alignment Challenges Persist

Laura Ramos

C'mon, admit it. How many times have you heard this?:

"We generate a ton of leads for sales, and they barely follow-up on any of them."

"Leads? You call those leads? Send us better leads so we CAN follow-up..."

Despite advances in marketing automation and an increased focus on accountability, the old sales-marketing divide is alive and well. Marketing technology and processes have yet to turn the sales and marketing boxing ring into a night of candlelit dinners.

And similar tensions will likely persist since these teams have different charters and timelines under which they operate. Marketing and sales may share demand creation goals, but they don't get measured in the same way or with the same metrics.

Their perspectives are vastly different. Marketing looks at customers by segment while sales looks at them by name, title, and account. Neither understands completely how customers benefit from what they buy.

On the customer side, B2B purchasing is a complicated team game with decisions made by committee, with players entering and exiting the picture throughout the customer life cycle. As a result, enabling sales remains a contentious problem for many marketing teams. 

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The OPM Hack Is Bad News For Federal Customer Experience Improvement

Rick Parrish

It’s been a rough nine months for federal cybersecurity. The huge Office of Personnel Management (OPM) hack is just the latest in a series of incidents that make people skeptical of Washington’s ability to protect their personal information. Since last fall, we’ve witnessed hacks of the:

  • OPM. Last week’s cybersecurity failure at OPM wasn’t its first run-in with hackers. In March 2014, hackers broke into OPM networks in an attempt to exfiltrate information about security clearances. Federal authorities claimed to have blocked the hackers from the network, but last week’s OPM cybersecurity failure should make us skeptical.
  • Government Publication Office and Government Accountability Office. These two offices got hacked at the same time as OPM last year.
  • US Postal Service. On November 10, 2014, the USPS confirmed an intrusion into its network that resulted in the compromise of the data of more than 800,000 employees.
  • State Department. On November 17, 2014, the State Department said that its unclassified email systems had been compromised a month earlier. Three months after the initial intrusion, the State Department was still unable to eradicate the effects of the attack.
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. On November 12, 2014, NOAA confirmed that hackers had breached four of its websites.
  • President of the United States. The same attackers that breached the State Department in November 2014 compromised the White House's unclassified email system about a month later and gained access to President Obama’s email.
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Technology Advancements Mean Machine Translation Has Earned A Second Chance

Lily Varon

It's simple math: The sheer volume of translatable website content multiplied by the number of languages needed to globalize can make a translation initiative out of reach. The truth is that machine translation (MT) offers access to otherwise unreadable information for global consumers.

While it’s true MT can't account for context and tone and often fails to grasp the nuances and ambiguities of language, there are several technology advancements improving the quality and efficiency of MT. Additionally, the MT engines offered by language service providers aren't the humble online translation tools of yore. They include complex rules engines and sophisticated algorithms, which are often also trainable and customizable based on industry terminology, resulting in much higher quality translation output.

Before dismissing MT, eBusiness leaders should consider that:

  • Big data has made a big impact. Faster and more sophisticated algorithms allow for greater efficiency and accuracy in translation processes and workflows.MT relies on the coding and matching of languages — a vast and variable data set — thus, it has benefitted greatly from advances in analytics and data processing.  
  • Translation memory is boosting translation quality and efficiency. Translation memories are sophisticated language databases that store already translated content. By leveraging previously translated content, firms can reduce the volume of new content to translate plus improve consistency in translation outcomes.
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Build Trust Or Die

Thomas Husson

Trust is the most critical component to develop and maintain a healthy brand. Customers are more likely to trust experts, friends and relatives than marketing campaigns. That’s why it matters to deliver the experience you promise and to build a trusted community around your brand.

As marketers will need to use more personal data to power mobile and contextual experiences, we expect consumer distrust for brands to increase

No matter how quickly wearables and connected objects emerge in the next 10 years, mobility has already introduced a paradigm shift: the ability to collect and use data about individuals in the physical world. Mobility will change the nature of the data marketers can use and act upon. Data collected via mobile will be much more sensitive, more personal and more contextual. Via sensors on wearables or smartphones, marketers will access data on our bodies and our whereabouts in real-time. This represents a huge opportunity for marketers to power better marketing across all channels not just mobile. Mobile and connected objects will not only change the nature of the data marketers can access, it will also bring privacy concerns to the physical space and it risks breaking anonymization.

Together with my colleague Fatemeh Khatibloo, co-author of the report, we digged into our Technographics data to better understand consumers’ perceptions on mobile privacy. We also conducted many interviews to discuss with marketers, vendors, and regulators how they approach mobile data and privacy. Here below are a couple of facts we learnt:

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eCommerce Is Another Channel That Your Buyers Can Choose

Peter O'Neill

Elephant in the room:

“An English metaphorical idiom for an obvious truth that is either being ignored or going unaddressed.” (Cambridge Dictionaries Online)

I like working with my colleague Tim Harmon, our coryphée on channel enablement on the B2B marketing research team, one reason being that he works from his home office in Half Moon Bay, Northern California, and I can visit him for meetings. I know the area well because I lived there myself for three years back in my HP days. In 2000 and 2001, I had an exciting project managing several experimental joint ventures with companies like Ariba, Bank of America, Broadvision, and Yahoo. We wanted to offer an enterprise version of Yahoo.com to be integrated into company intranets and, in addition to planning the technology, I was also recruiting providers interested in being part of the “corporate yahoo” pages; for example, firms offering HR services such as retirement savings plans, executive wealth management plans, and health insurance to the corporate employees. The idea was that HP would take a cut when the provider sold something through the site. I guess we were somewhat ahead of our times; the technology, the status of Internet adoption, and the accountants in all the companies were definitely not ready for that business model back in 2001.

Which made me smile ruefully when I edited Tim’s latest report, “The Clash Of The Partner Channel And eCommerce,” last month.

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Making The Case To Go Global

Zia Daniell Wigder

Today we published the business case report for our eCommerce globalization playbook (client access req’d). In it, we discuss how to think about international expansion and how to win over executives with your plans for global domination. However, as a savvy digital business leader, you must first think through:

Is an international offering right for your brand? Business leaders are often lured into thinking that a global footprint is better than a domestic-only one, and that selling overseas is the only path to long-term riches. This is a flawed assumption. Many successful omnichannel retailers have little or no international presence; even web-only players like Zappos serve a US audience exclusively. Other retailers had a hard time penetrating new global markets and ultimately pulled the plug on their offerings. Don’t assume that having a sizeable global footprint is inherently better than having a singular focus on your own market or dedicating resources to just a few international initiatives.

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CX Interview On IBM Design Thinking And Designcamp With Charlie Hill Of IBM

Allegra Burnette

Charlie Hill is a software product designer and an advocate for user-centric product development. As distinguished engineer and chief technical officer for design, Charlie is helping to build a world-class design capability across IBM. Charlie leads development and worldwide implementation of IBM Design Thinking, IBM's cross-disciplinary product development practice. We sat down to talk more about design thinking leading up to Charlie’s keynote at CXNYC 2015.

Photo of Charlie HillQ: In the process of bringing hundreds of new designers into the IBM product teams, you’ve created a structured program around onboarding and general training. Can you tell us more about that program and how it started?

A: There are two related things that we focus on: education and activation. Broadly speaking, we look for ways to scale our approach to onboarding design talent and empowering teams with design thinking practices. Those practices are not just for designers. They’re practices that bring the whole team together — and that includes business people such as product managers, engineers writing code, release managers, and architects — as well as designers. When we started our program, we pretty much handcrafted the first few projects. We focused on figuring out how to apply design methods effectively, which led us to create IBM Design Thinking. Then, we needed to create education offerings that bring IBM Design Thinking to a larger group of projects in a scalable way. All our education offerings are now under the Designcamp banner.

Q: How does Designcamp work? Is there just one Designcamp?

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