Getting Ready For My Teleconference On Field Marketing

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

I like I like to be prepared. Next Monday I give (present? perform?
recite?) my first Forrester Teleconference about field marketing. See http://www.forrester.com/rb/teleconference/field_marketing_professionals_must_adapt_to_new/q/id/6065/t/1

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Is Gen X A Global Concept? How Generations Get Lost In Translation

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

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The Data Digest: US Consumers' Shopping Attitudes By Generation

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

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How to Sell Connected TVs this Holiday Season

James McQuivey

The signs of the holidays are all around us: my teenagers have started listening to the local holiday music station, people are bundling up in anticipation of the snow that will soon be upon us, and the Wall Street Journal is reporting on the expected sales of TVs at WalMart this Black Friday. 

Aside from the economy, I'm following holiday shopping results because of the humble little devices we call connected TVs. CES 2009 featured many a promise from major TV makers – they assured us that connected TVs were finally ready to rock. Based on that, we estimated that a million of these TVs would be in US homes by the end of the year. In fact, if all the promises were kept, these million would be an easy sell because they would have fancy widget experiences just like the iPhone. Plus, we were assured the technology would get better every day so that accessing Internet content on the TV would feel as natural as switching from Dancing with the Stars to House (an activity I encourage).

This is not the time to go into my disappointment at the failure of some of those TVs to even arrive, much less the less-than-iPhone-like widget experiences they have delivered so far. Instead, in the spirit of technology denial, I’d rather focus on the fact that even if these TVs could do everything we hoped, somebody still has to sell them at retail. No, I'm not concerned we won't hit the million mark. Instead, I'm concerned that we'll have a million or more out there, but that fewer than 40% of them will actually connect to the Internet.

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Taking B2B Marketing to the “Next Level” in 2010

Laura Ramos

Laura Ramos [Posted by Laura Ramos]

Thanksgiving is next week, and it marks the start of the mad dash to
the end of the year. As I look towards 2010, I see B2B marketers, in
the tech industry and elsewhere, face increasing pressure to reach
decision-makers, justify spending, and deliver high-quality leads to an
increasingly dissatisfied sales organization. Compounding these demands
is a lingering recession and increasing pressure from product
commoditization, new business models, functional outsourcing, and a social groundswell where buyers turn to peers to validate purchase decisions.

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Bing/News Corp: Not a Game Changer

It’s Berlin, Circa 1989, and the Media Industries Are East Germany

James McQuivey

Allow me to add my voice to the chorus of those applauding the fall of the Berlin wall twenty years ago this month. It was this event that taught me firsthand why revolution is simultaneously impossible as well as inevitable. In 1986 I sat with other students from around the globe just blocks from the wall and debated whether it would ever come down. The naïve among us insisted freedom was imperative: It was inevitable. The others asked if we had stopped to think about the massive relocation of people, economic resources, and government structures that such a revolution would require: It was impossible.

Until it happened, just three years later.

 

Brandenburg tor eastside

The author, pictured left, photographed in front of the Brandenburg
Gate from what was then the East German side

 

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It's Been A While, Why — And What's Going On With Sales Enablement These Days?

Scott Santucci

It’s been a long time since I’ve updated this blog, and it’s been brought to my attention by many of you as we discuss the sales enablement topic at: conferences, meetings, over peaking duck Peking duck (wow, this is what happens when you trust Word too much in your edits and try to get something out too quickly over the voices of children who want you to go downstairs and play Wii with them), or during inquires.   (NOTE: guys, if you add comments, I know you are reading!!)

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Oprah abandons broadcast TV for a life in cable: Oprah, we need to talk...

James McQuivey

Just this Monday Sarah Palin told Oprah she was "the queen of talk shows." Which might mean there's no better time to abdicate the throne than when you're clearly on top (and when the #2 talk show, Dr. Phil is produced by you). 

But Oprah didn't just announce that when she wraps her 25th season in 2011 she will wrap the show for good. No, she announced that she would also begin the next chapter in her mega-successful life: she's going to move to cable. Her cable network, titled OWN, for Oprah Winfrey Network, was actually announced some time ago, so while that's not news, the fact that Ms. Winfrey is moving away from daytime television's most-watched show to build a fledgling cable network is an eyebrow-raiser. 

Because cable TV is no safe haven away from the woes of broadcasters.

Audiences are fragmenting, cable TV is having a harder and harder time maintaining viewers in the face of the DVR and Hulu one-two punch. In fact, OWN was supposed to be up and running this winter but was postponed because of the challenging advertiser climate. It's a climate that's not going to get dramatically better even if our economy continues to improve. That's because advertisers have many alternatives for their advertising dollars, including the Internet, where more and more spending is shifting every day, reaching nearly $26 billion this year (see our July 2009 Interactive Marketing Forecast report for more detail).

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The Data Digest: A Deep Dive Into Asian Consumers' Online Behavior

Reineke Reitsma

Reineke Reitsma [Posted by Reineke Reitsma]

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