The Online Panel Quality Debate Continues

Reineke Reitsma

Last week, I was in LA, hosting a session on online panel quality at Forrester’s Marketing Forum. I discussed the past, present, and future of online panel quality with Steve Schwartz from Microsoft, Maria Cristina Gomez from Procter & Gamble, and Frank Findley from ARS Group.

Online panel quality is still a major issue in the industry. The whole discussion started in 2006 with a speech by Kim Dedeker -- at that time, the VP of global consumer and market knowledge at Procter & Gamble. In it, she publicly expressed her concerns about online panel quality, how it affected their research results, and, as a result, the credibility of market research. In her speech, she stressed that, in her opinion, the industry – both research suppliers and clients – needed to focus on how to improve the overall quality of research. Her appeal to the industry was very successful. Many other research buyers weighed in with their stories, and the research providers took up the challenge. Since then, many initiatives have started, such as the ARF’s Foundation of Quality and ESOMAR’s 26 questions, as well as more technology-driven approaches like Peanut Labs’ Optimus and MarketTools’ TrueSample.

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Why Hulu Will (and Should) Charge for Hulu Plus

James McQuivey

The Hulu-will-charge-you-money rumor mill is churning once again and the blogosphere has lit up with preemptively angered Hulu viewers vowing that they will never darken Hulu’s digital door again. Some call it greed, others point to nefarious pressure from ailing broadcast and cable operations, while some decry the end of a freewheeling era. They are all wrong.

Hulu charging for content is a good thing. In fact, it’s a necessary next step to get us where we need to be. Let me explain.

This comes at an awkward time, to say the least. The site’s CEO, Jason Kilar, admitted just weeks ago that the free site is profitable, taking in more than $100 million last year and on a run-rate to more than double that this year. Blunting that momentum would be foolish. But letting it run absent the burden of helping to pay for the shows it profits from would also be irresponsible, and not in a Father-knows-best “charging for content builds character” kind of irresponsible, but in a more “not taking advantage of the opportunity to take Hulu to the next level in benefit of the consumer” kind of irresponsible.

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Live Streaming from Forrester Marketing Forum 2010 - Day Two

Christine Overby

Marketers shoot at lighthouses

While Day 1 live-streaming is done, we’ve archived video below so that it’s available to you post-event.

Day Two of the Forrester Marketing Forum goes deeper into the org structure and processes needed to be adaptive. Morning keynotes from Dave Frankland of Forrester and Tom Boyles, Senior Vice President at Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, focus on the theme of “Know Thy Customer” – specifically how marketers make sense of customer data in order to deliver great experiences. Then up, it’s Josh Bernoff and Augie Ray to unveil Forrester’s new Peer Influence Analysis in the keynote “Energizing Word of Mouth through Social Media”. Afternoon track sessions and guest executive forums dive deeper into the best practices and case studies of adaptive marketing. Thanks to all of you who have Tweeted, posted pictures, and, in general, kept up a lively online conversation!

Today's Live Stream
8:30 a.m.-8:40 a.m. PST

Day Two Opening Remarks
Carlton Doty
, Vice President, Research Director, Forrester
Christine Overby
, Vice President, Role Manager - Interactive Marketing, Forrester

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The Data Digest: Brand Attitudes Of Online African Americans

Reineke Reitsma

In general, online African Americans are less well-off and spend less while shopping online  compared with other online consumers. However, several factors point to the opportunity of further engaging with this group. Our Technographics® research shows that African American online users are much less annoyed by the amount of advertising today compared with online users overall: 60% of the US online population agree that they are annoyed by advertising, versus only 39% of online African Americans. Furthermore, ads inform the purchase decisions that online African Americans make: Nearly twice as many African American online users (27%) as overall online users (15%) agree that ads help them decide what to buy.

Furthermore, 24% of online African Americans recognize that owning the best brand is important to them, compared with only 16% of all US online consumers. Therefore, brand reputation is a much bigger influencer in their purchase decision process.

Marketing Forum Day 1 Wrap-up

Christine Overby

Forrester forums always go by in a blur - so many ideas and conversations crammed into 2 short days. I'm still synthesizing, but even so, there are some key insights that I've jotted down from my seat in the speaker's gallery:

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Interview with ITSMA about Linking Global Strategy and Field Execution

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill

The IT Services Marketing Association (ITSMA) has just published this interview with me to its members to coincide with my presentation on this topic at the Forrester Marketing Forum here in Los Angeles. For those European members of ITSMA, I’d like to point out that I will be hosting and contributing to the ITSMA workshop “Building the Business Case for Social Media in B2B Marketing” in London on May 5th. Perhaps I will see you there  . Anyway, I’m enjoying our conversations, so keep your comments and emails coming.   

Always keeping you informed!

Peter

 

In this Viewpoint, Peter O’Neill, VP & Principal Analyst, Forrester, shares his research on and passion for international technology industry marketing, with a specific emphasis on field marketing strategy and execution, including the dynamics of interactions between headquarters and field marketing organizations.

ITSMA:What challenges do marketers face due to globalization?

O’Neill: Our clients often ask the basic question: What does it mean to "go global"? Well, going global really means having customers in multiple countries—i.e., in local geographic

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Live Streaming from Forrester Marketing Forum 2010 - Day One

Christine Overby

Update: Day 1 was a great dive into the theme of Adaptive Marketing. While Day 1 live-streaming is done, we’ve archived video below so that it’s available to you post-event.

We are so excited to be in Los Angeles hosting the 4th annual Forrester Marketing Forum! This year, we have 550 attendees from various industries and roles – all here to connect and discuss how to design a flexible marketing organization that thrives on change.

Our bang-up roster of keynotes include: Pam Kaufman, CMO of Nickelodeon; Steven Sickel, SVP of Marketing at Intercontinental Hotel Groups; Tom Boyles, SVP of Marketing at Walt Disney Parks and Resorts; James Cornell, CMO of Prudential Retirement; Chris Bradshaw, CMO at Autodesk (the software firm that made the movie Avatar possible); Deborah Nelson, SVP of Marketing at HP; and Marjorie Tenzer, VP of Marketing & Communications at IBM. Below are the highlights of the speeches and the twitter stream for those of you who couldn't make the trip and for those of your monitoring from the event.

How Do You Manage Multinational Social Media Programs? We'd Like To Know!

Nate Elliott

Lately, a lot of our clients have been asking about how to manage their social media programs across more than one country. It's a real challenge: While some sites (like MySpace) have long offered solutions to help marketers direct users from different countries to the correct branded page, the current social media leaders (Facebook, YouTube and Twitter) don't seem to do this nearly as well. How, then, do you make sure that the Facebook page on which you post UK-specific content doesn't misinform your European fans? How do make sure the support community designed to help your US customers doesn't confuse your Canadian audience? Do you create multiple pages in each social network to serve all the countries in which you operate? Or do you maintain a single presence in each network, and avoid posting any country-specific material? If you offer different product lines in different countries -- or use radically different marketing strategies market by market -- it only gets more difficult.

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Why in-stream ad frequency is rising -- and why it'll rise further

Nate Elliott

Earlier this month, Corey Kronengold at Online Video Watch was complaining about the in-stream ad load at MLB.tv. But unfortunately for Corey – and for the other two-thirds of US Internet users who now watch online video – the ad load seems likely to get heavier rather than lighter.

In the fourth quarter of 2009, my team and I spent at least 30 minutes watching video on each of 84 leading sites in the US and Europe to better understand how marketers and sites are deploying online video ads – an exercise I’ve conducted each of the past three years. What did we find? Advertising, and a lot of it. In fact, 85% of US web sites and 64% of European sites now accept in-stream ads. And we saw more advertising per online video hour than ever before. 

85% of US web sites accept in-stream video ads

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Trip Report From Symantec's VISION Conference

Peter O'Neill

By Peter O'Neill (with some comments by colleague Jonathan Penn)

I spent a couple of days with Symantec executives this week in Las Vegas, attending their Worldwide Analyst Summit as well as day 1 of the VISION user group conference. My interest in Symantec is partly based on my research in the service management market - they bought Altiris a few years ago; and also because I watch their partner program work. Anyway, here are my highlights of the briefings.

Symantec has a very subdued style of presenting to analysts, but for users it was all show business

The presentations to us started very gently and modestly. Instead of egoistical VPs showing slides and speaking down to us from the stage, they led with a panel discussion moderated by their major entertainer, Steve Morton, VP of Product Marketing. That was much more pleasant to listen to and the required points were still all made. Also the tone of the questions was often very self-critical (“now Symantec is not renowned for having integrated its acquisitions well, how are we doing on that front now?”) - a good idea. I am sure it was easy to work out what critical questions were going to come and pre-empt those discussions.   

Now Steve is probably the reason they bought Altiris because the “keynote” session at VISION was a 90 minutes Tonight show with Steve performing more like Jay Leno than the man himself. Clearly very talented in this role, he was aptly supported by a band, videos and stage show. From his stage desk he hosted numerous guests on his couch in a humorous, chatty, and loosely-scripted format.  Again, all the points were made without boring anybody.

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