Global Payments Acquisition of Heartland Payments a Sign of Things to Come

Brendan Miller

Global Payments Announced on Tuesday that is planning to buy Heartland Payment Systems, a rival payment processor for $4.3 billion in cash and stock.  The two companies’ combined will be the 6th largest U.S. payment acquirer based on card purchase volume and the largest U.S acquirer based on active merchant locations (using March 2015 Nilson data to re-calculate the size of the new company).    

Global Payments gets Heartland’s direct sales force focused on selling to higher margin SMB merchants as well as new ISV and Reseller distribution relationships for its OpenEdge Integrated Payments Channel.  Global also gains a stronger U.S. presence in restaurant, retail and education verticals.

  • The new combined company will need to determine how to avoid channel conflict with Heartland’s POS companies, Xpient, pcAmerica, Dinerware and Liquer POS.  OpenEdge has operated with a strict mantra not to compete against the channel in the past.  Heartland Payments has had a more blended go-to-market strategy – enabling its direct sales to sell its POS systems while simultaneously developing ISV/Reseller channel.
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Content Marketing Rules, But We Should Not Call It “Marketing Content”

Peter O'Neill

At Forrester, Research Directors do many things around the research process. We help analysts to establish a research agenda and keep them current for the next 12 months – we negotiate the report outlines, edit the drafts, and share the research and reports around other parts of Forrester to ensure consistency. Then, we often create or edit “blurb” text for promotional efforts (tweets, blogs, newsletters). I was sent a proposed blurb (written by our own marketing group) announcing our new report “Make Sales Conversations An Integral Part Of Your Content Marketing Plans”. The blurb said

“Getting Sales to be the content concierge for marketing content.”

I stared at the sentence for a long time. Is that we mean? Do we want to force-feed marketing content to our sales colleagues? Calling it “marketing content” sounded demeaning and confusing; is that Sales’ job – distributing what marketing wants them to distribute? No, of course not. But their job is certainly to share and provide content to their conversation partners that is compelling and interesting and useful – stuff that helps the buyer to proceed down their journey. And the content is usually created by marketing (unless the salesperson cannot find it in which case it is made up on the fly).

So the blurb that ended up in next week’s “Forrester 5” promotional email to be sent to all clients is:

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Online Display And Social Media Advertising Will Account For Nearly A Quarter Of Total European Advertising Revenue By 2020

Samantha Merlivat
Combined, online display and social media advertising spend will double between 2015 and 2020, growing from €14.4 billion to €28.7 billion.
 
Among the factors driving growth, the combination of mobile and premium video advertising will drive an upsurge in demand for both online display and social advertising. Advertisers will increase their investments in video and mobile ads as media consumption evolves and targeting accuracy improves.
 
Native mobile video advertising is already proving a winning formula in the social media sphere, and publishers will take notice as they further refine their video ad offerings to provide more premium inventory, preventing a decline of video ad CPMs as supply increases. In fact, mobile ad spend will overtake PC as PC flatlines in the next five years.
 
Other developments will continue to disrupt online ad revenue in the next five years: 
  • Programmatic will become the default mechanism for trading online display
  • Ad blocking will force new behaviors on the publisher side, and a greater struggle to hit the sweet spot between monetization and consumer experience.
  • Growing rivalries between Apple, Facebook, and Google for news aggregation services will further dis-intermediate publisher mobile advertising revenue.
To find all the trends affecting online display and social media advertising in the next five years, read Forrester’s European Online Display and Social Media Advertising Forecast, 2015-2020.

Don't Build A Digital Strategy; Digitize Your Business Strategy

Martin Gill

Business leaders don't think of digital as central to their business because in the past, it hasn't been. But now your customers, your products, your business operations, and your competitors are fundamentally digital. To win in this new world, digital leaders must reimagine their businesses as fundamentally digital. Do this, and you can become a digital predator; fail, and your business will become digital prey.

This isn’t a fundamentally new message from Forrester. We’ve been saying this for a couple of years now. But what we have done is update our thinking and our data on the subject based on our most recent research and a major new survey in partnership with Odgers Berndtson.

The result is that we’ve updated the Digital Business Imperative- the anchor document for our Digital Business Transformation playbook. In some ways it's disturbing reading, because while the overwhelming majority of executives now acknowledge that digital will disrupt their industry, just over a quarter think that their firm has an appropriate strategy in place to respond.

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Understanding "Creepiness"

Fatemeh Khatibloo

We've all felt it: a weird sense that information about you has been used in a way that just doesn't feel right.

Maybe you received a kids apparel catalog at your decidedly DINK home. Or maybe you saw an online ad at home for a product you'd been looking at from your work computer earlier that day. Or, perhaps your mobile device pinged when you walked into a store to tell you about specials for that store - even though your location settings were turned off.

Many of us in the privacy world have a strong dislike of the word "creepy" because it can't be quantified. And, practically-speaking, it's rather useless because what's "creepy" to one person might well be "useful" to another.

I'm working on research to quantify what we mean when we say something is "creepy," and to categorize the types of incidents that cause people to feel it. That means I need examples - lots of them. And I need your help.

If you've had a creepy marketing, advertising, or customer service experience, won't you please take a moment to tell us about it?

We've set up a short 8-question survey that you can complete anonymously, if you prefer. Your contribution will help us understand how we experience creepiness, and help us educate companies about how not to be creepy!

Yahoo’s Challenge: Mobile. Yahoo’s Answer: China.

Julie Ask

Yahoo’s board met yesterday amidst disappointing financial results that have failed to live up to the expectations of its investors. Prevailing rumors suggest that the board under pressure from investors will vote to break apart the business and sell the pieces.

While it is true that the majority of Yahoo’s revenue comes from online advertising, the future is clearly mobile. Mobile phone numbers are more important than email addresses, and consumers already use their mobile phones more than two hours a day in the U.S. Global expansion depends on mobile.

Power in mobile depends on two core factors: audience and data. Here’s why.

Audience will draw in developers, advertisers and service providers. Today in mobile, audience depends on a strong presence in social networking, instant messaging, and media (e.g., video, music, games, news and books).

Data is the context that drives the value of the audience. The more context brands have about consumers to offer them insights about needs and motivations, the better brands can win, serve and retain those customers in their mobile moments. Winning in data includes access to email, browser, maps, search, wallet, commerce, health, fitness, home and automotive data - as a start. Those who own the mobile OS (e.g., Apple, Google and Microsoft in the U.S.) own the trump card in data.

Simply put, despite a host of strategic mobile acquisitions (e.g., social media, mobile analytics) and new talent, Yahoo! is still too small. It lacks the scale of Facebook or Google. This makes Yahoo a good partner, but not the booming, independent success that each of these businesses has become.

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The Data Digest: Television Without The TV Set

Anjali Lai

A week ago, my family crowded around our living-room TV to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade, and I couldn’t help thinking about the ironic clash between tradition and innovation: On the one hand, we mirrored that classic tableau of the family gathered around a single source of entertainment; on the other, our smart TV offered a distinctly modern viewing experience.

This fine balance between tradition and innovation is widespread — especially in regards to the evolution of TV media. Our Consumer Technographics® data shows that US consumers’ love for TV is unwavering, but the ways in which viewers access content are rapidly changing. Streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime have been catalysts for this change; now Comcast’s recently launched Stream TV opens a new avenue for TV consumption that lives somewhere between cable and Internet properties. With Stream TV, Comcast is targeting a growing group of TV lovers who don’t actually have a TV:

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Vendors: Take Advantage Of European Marketers' High Propensity To Buy Technology

Peter O'Neill

Wake up, B2B marketing and sales enablement automation vendors — especially those of you in North America. Many of you have not yet seriously set up shop in Europe because you consider firms there to be late adopters of marketing and sales automation.

Well, they are perhaps late from your point of view, but they have now caught up. Forrester’s Global Business Technographics® Marketing Survey, 2015 reveals the proportion of B2B companies intending to buy or expand their automation projects for, among other things: content management; sales; online marketing; and marketing automation. In each case, European firms’ propensity to buy is actually much higher than that of their North American counterparts. For example, 53% of European firms plan to adopt or expand their use of marketing automation software, compared with 37% of North American firms.

But remember, the marketing and sales disciplines are also markedly different in Europe than in North America, with local differences apparent within Europe as well. In our survey, 64% of European marketers described their organization as federated compared with just 40% in North America. This reflects the fragmentation of the target markets that European firms sell to: They need to use many more channels, languages, and messages to be effective.  

European B2B sales organizations are also more complex: 33% see their channel partners as their primary sales channel, compared with 11% in North America; in contrast, 34% of North American firms see direct sales as their primary sales channel, but just 10% of their European peers do. The result? Sales enablement projects are quite different.

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Beyond The Beacon Proximity-Marketing Hype, Fuel Contextual Marketing With Location Data

Thomas Husson

When it comes to location-based marketing and proximity-marketing, more often than not, marketers seem fascinated by the beacon technology.

With 82% of shoppers making their actual purchasing decision in-aisle, it’s no wonder that vendors are betting on beacons and indoor positioning systems to help marketers interact with consumers in real time.

A year ago, Forrester warned of the hype around beacons. Despite huge interest and numerous successful pilots, we have yet to see very many successful commercial rollouts. This is not so much about the technology (even though battery life and operational deployments raise technology issue), but primarily because reach is limited today and because few marketers can deliver smart contextual messages at scale. They must also define engagement scenarios and automated rules to deliver relevant messages to individual customers.

Location data alone is dumb. Sending someone a coupon to redeem in a nearby store just because they’re passing by isn’t enough. For ads and messages to be relevant, firms must combine location data with insights like past behaviors, preferences, needs, and situations. It is also likely they will have to combine multiple technologies to reduce the complexity of in-store operational deployments and boost the accuracy of location data.

There are many more opportunities than just pushing marketing messages in real-time. Using location data is more important than just capturing the attention of nearby smartphone owners — it’s about powering contextual marketing.

In particular, marketers should fuel contextual marketing with location data to:

  • Increase brand preference by delivering personalized experiences
  • Improve the customer experience on location
  • Advertise more efficiently
  • Unlock audience targeting and offer intention data
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Your Partners Are Floundering In The New Services World Order — Here’s How To Help Them

Tim Harmon

The tech value-added services (VAS) business used to be so easy: Your channel partners would provide installation, configuration, training, and maintenance services for all vendor products that they resold. Their — and your — primary value target (i.e., whom they sold to) was the IT organization. And the required expertise was in the products, not the customer’s business. But technology itself — including cloud computing and the Internet of Things (IoT) — has upended the VAS market. Forever.

·         Cloud technology has pretty much wiped out the installation services business. And it’s not just tech products/solutions that are affected. Pretty much everything B2B is now offered to customers “as a service.”

·         IoT technology promises to do the same to the maintenance services business. For example, Thermocable, a British manufacturer of heating cables, with the help of IoT developer Concirrus, created a remote monitoring solution that generates automated alerts on a cable breakage or damage, as well as triggering technology to take remediation action remotely — in effect displacing partners’ onsite support services.

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