Live from the Omniture Summit: The New Principles of A Successful CMO

Shar VanBoskirk

Coming to you live this morning from the kick off keynote of the Adobe (nee Omniture) Summit in Salt Lake City.  And I'm pleased to report that so far the event is as thumping and hued in neon green as in years past. 

A nice change from past summits: Instead of discussing developments to Omniture's online marketig technology, today's Omniture keynote by Josh James is themed around "The New Principles Of A Successful CMO."  These are Josh's principles for how marketing execs can succeed.

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A Conversation With LoopFuse About The Marketing Automation Market

Laura Ramos

Since publishing the market overview for the lead management automation space, I have been pleasantly surprised by the number of current and emerging vendors who got in touch wanting to talk further, learn more about my research, and (well, frankly) “influence” the analyst.

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The Data Digest: US Gaming Behavior

Reineke Reitsma

Americans spend a lot of time playing games, and not only the young. Our Technographics data show that all generations spend about 7 hours a week playing PC games, but younger consumers top this up with playing games on consoles, handhelds, and mobile phones. Generation Y spends close to 20 hours a week playing games!

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Forrester's Sales Enablement Roundtable Findings Teleconference Is On March 5th

Scott Santucci

I got back from Europe over the weekend and have some great stories, but what I am really excited to do is share some of the findings from Forrester's third Sales Enablement Roundtable executive exchange session. To help chart a course for this rapidly emerging discipline, we have been rolling up our sleeves and getting into the details about this very important and complex topic.

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Mobile World Congress 2010: a wrap up

Thomas Husson

I posted some thoughts when in Barcelona last week. So did my colleagues Mike Cansfiled, Charles Golvin and Ian Fogg. Now that I am back from the MWC pilgrimage and that I have digested briefings, meetings, press releases and demos, here are my key takeways on the Mobile Mecca gathering.  

 

The mobile industry is in full swing. Its center of gravity is shifting from hardware to software, from voice to data and services, and from traditional telecom stakeholders to new entrants.

Google’s “mobile first” approach and the shadow that Apple cast over the show are forcing mobile operators in particular to redefine their position in the value chain. The traditional focus on infrastructure (LTE..) and this year’s debate on operators’ congested networks need to be put in the context of nontelecom players’ willingness to monetize mobile. Mobile World Congress is a unique opportunity to witness how mobile is reinventing itself and to see how it will become even more disruptive in consumers' daily lives in the future.

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Online shoppers in the US do not just spend dollars at home

Zia Daniell Wigder

Last year we wrote a couple of reports that highlighted cross-border online shoppers in Europe, where some 29% of online shoppers had purchased from another country.

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Clients Ask The Darndest Things (About Their Big Business Issues)

Ellen Carney

I’m going to admit something here. . . most of my fellow analysts here chuckle when I profess my love for the insurance industry. Why do I like it so much? Well, one reason is because when I do my "Carney. . . like Art" spiel when someone asks how to spell my last name, insurance people "get it". Yep, they watched "The Honeymooners" and "The Jackie Gleason Show" and know exactly what I’m talking about, unlike most of my co-workers who, with the "Carney. . .

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How Well Do Vendors Use Social Media?

Peter O'Neill

We've just published our latest Vendor Positioning Review (VPR) benchmark of the IT management software market. This vendor-oriented report discusses how vendors market their solutions to you in collateral and on their Web sites. We focus on how well they talk Business Technology (BT) over IT — how well do they speak YOUR language. And we recognize how important B2B digital media has become in communicating with you — our most recent data shows that the percent of technology buyers that are most advanced in using social media, what we call the Creators and Critics, is nearly double that of the US consumer population in general.

The VPR report highlights a best practice (or two) in each of the categories that we evaluate. 
ITMS VPR BP q409_PONv2

In terms of providing you with social media facilities, the vendors are a mixture of active, indifferent and inactive. The good ones offer you a community Web page from their Home Page to access forums, join communities (even if only a support community) and see their blogs: kudos to BMC, CA, ManageEngine, newScale, Spiceworks and Splunk. EMC, HP Software, IBM Tivoli, Microsoft, Nimsoft, Quest and Symantec have the facilities as well but you need to be good to find them (who would think of looking under “About Symantec”?). ASG and Compuware aren’t there yet.

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Categories:

People will still pay for (access to) content

James McQuivey

Just came off the stage at PaidContent 2010, a day-long summit here at The Times Center near Times Square, dedicated to the question of if/how/when people will pay for content. The timing is good -- as I wrote in January, The New York Times is planning to charge for content within a year or so, Hulu is considering a subscription model (not necessarily in place of but, I believe, in addition to its free service), and the eBook pricing dilemmas are causing sleepless nights.

I opened the conference with a brief assertion that fretting over whether people will pay for content is based on a mistaken assumption: that people have ever paid for content in the past. They actually haven't. Instead, people have paid for access to content. But in an analog world, access was gated by physical form factors like vinyl, newsprint, and movie theaters. As a result, the coincidence of form factor and content made us believe that people pay for content.

But people have never paid for content. Even when a daily newspaper was a necessity for the average home, the dime you paid a day (in the 70s) for a newspaper did not cover the print cost, much less the reporting. Instead, it was classified ads and auto dealers who footed most of the bill. And the hours we spent on TV and radio every day through the last half of the last century until the explosion of cable in the 90s, were all free. When cable finally asserted itself, people did not pay per show or even by channel (with the exception of premium movie channels). Instead, they paid for overall access.

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The Data Digest: US Online Grocery Shopping

Reineke Reitsma

Grocery shopping is one of the largest offline retail categories but our Technographics data shows that it has one of the lowest online retail penetration figures in the US: Less than 10% of online adults have purchased groceries online and only 16% of online grocery buyers purchase groceries online more than once a month.

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