The Forrester Wave™: Web Analytics, Q2 2014 Shows That Web Analytics Is More Important Than Ever

James McCormick

At Forrester we have talked about the fact that digital intelligence has replaced web analytics.  Digital intelligence tackles emerging channels, sophisticated consumers, technical challenges, and the enterprise democratization of digital analytics.  Achieving this requires a technology toolkit which far outstrips the data, analytics and action remit of even the top web analytics tools.  Does that mean we throw away web analytics?  Absolutely not!  Forrester’s most recent research shows that web analytics remains relevant even as digital intelligence strategies mature because top vendors are:

  • Extending the capabilities of their web analytics tools to collect and ingest multiple on and offline data sources and democratizing insights and discovery by improving usability and support of sophisticated data and analytics techniques.  
  • Supporting other processes, systems and tools within the digital intelligence toolkit which provides actionably (e.g testing, behavioral  targeting, etc.) by making web analytics data and insights available to these systems – in real time.

Don’t throw away web analytics; use it as a starting point and cornerstone for your firm’s digital intelligence journey.

Check the recent Forrester Wave™: Web Analytics, Q2 2014 wave report to get further insight as to how enterprise web analytics vendors have advanced their products to support digital intelligence.

Make More Persuasive Infographics By Balancing Context With Simplicity

Ryan Morrill

A colleague shared a recent Harvard Business Review article with me after I mentioned seeing The Best American Infographics on display in my local bookstore. The article was a brief interview with the series editor, Gareth Cook, and covered some of his thoughts on what makes a great infographic.

If there was one overall theme, it would be persuasiveness. In fact, this was presented as self-evident — an almost inherent quality of any great infographic — so the interview primarily focused on what makes an infographic persuasive.

“First, I’d say, they all have a clear focus. The designer has gone in and removed all the extraneous details so you see just what you need to understand the message behind it.”

I couldn’t agree more. In my own graphics, I am constantly trying to simplify and boil them down to the essential elements — from the text and layout to the colors and icons — that help make the point of the graphic clear.

But in the process of simplifying my graphics, I have sometimes found myself approaching a line — and it’s one that you do not want to cross — after which the graphic is too simple, lacks sufficient context, and loses all its weight. For example, I’ve simplified the pie chart below and used color to help emphasize the point of the graphic.

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Mobile Moments Change Everything — Check Out #MyMobileMoment And Add Your Own

Josh Bernoff

Stop thinking in terms of what you do, or how your technology works now. Start thinking in terms of the mobile moments of your customers.

A mobile moment is a point in time and space when someone pulls out a mobile device to get what he or she wants immediately, in context.

Thinking in terms of mobile moments is the lesson of our new book, The Mobile Mind Shift. It's a new way of thinking for many companies, but it's essential to getting mobile strategy right. Without it, you end up spending a lot of effort on features your customers won't use. Meanwhile, some entreprenuer like Lose It! or Roambi swoops in and steals your mobile moments.
 
How pervasive are mobile moments? We started a hashtag campaign on #MyMobileMoment to encourage people to share the mobile moments. Go ahead, check out the hundreds of posts so far. Or post your own.

Here are few revealing posts we've seen:

Mobile is there in a moment of crisis.

And in the second-grade spelling homework.

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eCommerce Grows But Physical Stores Will Live On

Sucharita  Mulpuru

If I had a dime for every time I heard the question “Isn’t eCommerce taking over retail?”,  it wouldn’t make me wealthy, but I’d certainly have a few hundred dollars more than I do now. Nonetheless, it’s a question that is unfortunately misguided and has permeated our zeitgeist. The truth is that yes, eCommerce is growing - but physical retail is far from doomed. Let me take the two parts of that last sentence and address them each separately. 

First, the fact that eCommerce is growing. Forrester just released the latest five-year online retail forecast and to no one’s surprise, the numbers are big. We’re projecting $294B in eCommerce sales across 30 retail categories in 2014, expected to grow to $414B by 2018. The web keeps doing what it has always done well: it provides huge assortments of products, at comparable, often lower, prices than physical stores, with 24/7 access and often free shipping. For many categories like media products or electronics, we’ve already observed a heavy shift to the web channel away from physical stores. Add to that the ubiquity of mobile devices and that drives even more shopping in more instances and places. In fact, we’re projecting that $87B of that $294B will happen on phones and tablets in 2014, and that doesn’t even include another $28B in additional mobile transactions on sites and apps like Uber and Domino’s Pizza that aren’t even in that aforementioned mobile commerce number. 

But all this growth certainly doesn’t mean that stores are dying. Here’s why:

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Messaging Apps Are Thriving In The Age of The Customer

Thomas Husson

By now, you've surely heard of the second-largest acquisition in tech history, with Facebook acquiring WhatsApp for $19 billion.

However, you may be less familiar with other messaging apps like LINE, KakaoTalk, KIK, Nimbuzz, SnapChat, Vibes, Whisper, and many others.

If you think messaging apps are just a free way to communicate, you’re missing their potential: They are Mobile’s Trojan horse, as explained by my colleague Julie Ask here.

Messaging apps are mushrooming.They illustrate perfectly the age of the customer, which Forrester defines as a new business era where your customers are now empowered through social, mobile, and other technologies giving them the power to disrupt your business. Why? Because they are mastering the four key market imperatives Forrester has identified as critical to differentiate in the age of the customer:

■  Transforming the customer experience over SMS and other messaging tools. Messaging apps offer differentiated and seamless experiences over SMS and other mobile communication tools. For example, they offer advanced group messaging functionalities, multimedia features, constant innovation, and ability to opt-in or follow brands at consumers’ convenience. They are now morphing into marketing platforms redefining social media.

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New Customer Insights Analyst Covering Marketing Technology

If you haven’t kept up with the activity in the marketing technology space – acquisitions, product enhancements, "cloud" wars, et al., then I don’t blame you. The marketing technology landscape is complex, crowded, and confusing. To compete in the age of the customer, enterprises are quickly deploying technology to manage big data, execute contextual marketing, and orchestrate real-time customer interactions.

Whether you are a marketing technology vendor, buyer, or end user, this is an exciting time, and I am thrilled to join Forrester as a principal analyst on the Customer Insights team. I am based in London, and I will cover marketing technology along with my colleague Cory Munchbach. Together we will help Customer Insights (CI) Professionals as they navigate the digital marketing landscape and make marketing technology investment decisions. With a background that includes more than 25 years’ experience in marketing, customer analytics, product management, and product marketing, with both large and small vendors in the marketing technology sector, I am excited about my new role at Forrester and on the CI team.

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The Recent Attribution Technology Acquisitions Don't Surprise Us In The Least

Tina Moffett

On the morning of May 6, 2014, Google announced its intent to acquire Adometry, a leader in the attribution technology space. Later on the same day, AOL announced its intent to acquire Convertro, another top-performing attribution technology vendor. The Adometry acquisition is not surprising, as Google needed to make major investments in its existing attribution offering with some enhanced analytics and insights services, which Adometry can provide. AOL’s acquisition of Convertro was a move to further build out its ad technology stack, hoping to obtain strong attribution algorithm and stellar engineering staff through this acquisition.

Both companies stand to benefit from the acquisition of these small but extremely knowledgeable experts in marketing and media measurement. Two of the biggest benefits for each include:

  • A strong services staff with deep knowledge of all media and marketing data and, more importantly, the expertise in driving actionable insights in a complicated media-buying world.
  • An innovative ability to stitch data sources together — online, offline, and mobile — across the buyer’s journey.
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Harness The Power Of Customer Context To Deliver Utility

Carlton Doty

Last month, we had one of our best Forrester Forums For Marketing Leaders that I've been to, and I've been to all of them. With an on-site audience of nearly 1,000 marketing professionals, I really enjoyed hearing from many of you -- our valued clients -- about your thoughts on the need for new approaches to marketing. Next week, I hope our European clients will find our latest thinking on customer context and utility marketing as valuable as your peers in North America did. Forrester's Forum For Marketing Leaders in Europe is finally here, and I look forward to seeing you in London this Tuesday, May 13. Make sure you check out our latest research reports that go in-depth on the event theme, "Beyond The Campaign":

You'll see much more research on these topics out of our Marketing Leadership and Customer Insights practices this year, so be sure to set your research alerts now.

Having Faith In Apple Plus Beats

James McQuivey

A media frenzy arose last night when the Financial Times suggested it had word from the inside that Apple is closing in on buying Beats Electronics for $3.2 billion. The immediate response from all quarters has been puzzlement and on multiple levels. As the sun rose today, so did the doubts about the impending deal. Generally, large strategic acquisitions — like when Google bought Nest for a similar figure — can be justified on the basis of buying something you don’t already have: a promising new technology, a large customer base, or entrée into a desirable industry. None of these things apply to this acquisition by Apple. Acquisitions at a more mature business stage can typically be justified purely on a revenue or margin basis or the desire to snap up a brand with more energy. Those don’t apply here, either. Even those who have tried to stretch the argument a bit have suggested that Apple could be buying Beats purely for a quick road into the music streaming business as a hedge against Spotify — except that Apple owns the music industry and doesn’t need Beats to build the music streaming offering that the company has denied for years that it should even consider getting into.

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Introduce The Marketing RaDaR To China

Xiaofeng Wang

Marketers in China are becoming more aware of the effectiveness of their marketing spending. They will no longer blindly spend a lump sum on China Central Television’s ad auction, for example. Home appliance giant Haier Group recently announced that it will stop spending on traditional magazine ads and maintain paid editorials only.

As Chinese consumers increase the time they spend on new channels such as social and mobile, it's more important than ever for marketers in China to optimize all touchpoints to reach and make an impact on their target audiences, especially when it comes to the new challenge of multichannel and multiscreen orchestration.

My recent report Sharpen Your Mix In China With The Marketing RaDaR illustrates how the RaDaR framework (first introduced by my colleague Nate Elliott) can help marketers successfully prioritize resources across their entire marketing mix in China.

RaDaR refers to “reach and depth and relationship” — three types of channels. Smart marketers are beginning to embrace a four-stage customer life cycle, from discover, to explore, to buy, to engage, then back to discover, and different types of channels support different stages of the life cycle:

  • Reach channels support discovery. Chinese consumers use channels such as in-store promotions and online search to discover brands.
  • Depth channels support exploration and purchase. Chinese consumers use channels such as consumer review sites and friends’ recommendations to research products and services they want to buy.
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