Introducing The Digital Intelligence TechRadar™, Q2 2016: Essential Analytics Tech For Driving Digital Customer Experiences

James McCormick

Digital intelligence (DI) is the practice of bringing together the big data that we have on our customers to analyze and generate insights in so as to deliver the best, optimal and/or the most relevant experiences during moments of their digital interaction. Firms that get it right have a major competitive advantage in the digital age of the customer (For more information on the digital intelligence approach, see the “Optimize Customer Experiences With Digital Intelligence [61276]” Forrester report).

This hot topic is why I am excited to announce the publication of the brand new Forrester report entitled “TechRadar™: Digital Intelligence, Q2 2016 [76021]”.  In this report, I analyze and review the business success and growth of the 15 core technologies for digital data management, analytics, and experience optimization needed to deliver great digital intelligence capabilities.

Some of my findings include:

  • DI tech is really hot at the moment. Whether its technology to ingest, manage, and merge different customer data (e.g. tag management or data warehousing), or to generate digital insights (e.g. app analytics or spatial analytics), or that for optimizing digital interactions (e.g. online testing or behavioral targeting) we found all the core DI technologies are on a trajectory for delivering a moderate if not significant success.
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The Data Digest: Cinco de Mayo Celebrations Highlight Cross-Border And Cross-Cultural Differences

Anjali Lai

Today in the US, we are gearing up to celebrate Cinco de Mayo with lively music, ice-cold margaritas, colorful clothing — the works. But while many Americans use the day to revel in the trappings of Mexican culture, they often don’t realize that the holiday is actually met with little pomp and circumstance in Mexico itself.

Cinco de Mayo is one of many traditions that have been adopted — and appropriated — across country borders. But the holiday represents a larger concept that applies to people, too: As individuals relocate around the world, they spark cultural variations and build unique identities in their own right.

For example, Forrester’s Consumer Technographics® survey data shows that Mexican-born individuals who now live in the US develop distinct behaviors and attitudes: Not only do these longer-tenured US residents become more comfortable sharing sensitive data (like financial information) online, they also increasingly execute digital transactions:

It’s interesting to note that even though metropolitan Mexico and the US have similar mobile penetration rates, the device profile, technology attitudes, and digital behaviors that characterize Mexican consumers shift after they settle in the US.

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Do Millennials Lack Grit?

Mary Shea

In a recent blog post, "Why Millennials Struggle For Success", well known psychologist, author and MacArthur Fellow Angela Duckworth, explores the question many experienced business leaders and managers ask as well: What’s wrong with Millennials? Why do they keep changing jobs? Why do they complain when work needs to be taken home over the weekend? And so on. She asks if it’s because they don’t have enough grit. Duckworth believes the secret to outstanding success is not talent but rather a special blend of passion and persistence called grit. Duckworth developed a Grit Scale and now has scores from thousands of Americans where her data reveal that grit and age go hand and hand.

So what do we do with those Millennials? Today, Millennials make up one third of the workforce and in four years time they will be half. With the average age of the US B2B sales rep at 40 years old, millennial sellers are, or soon will be, the future revenue generators and business leaders for their firms. Smart sales and marketing leaders realize that status quo communication, management approaches and tools will fail to inspire, and are adapting their enablement strategies and tech stacks to resonate with this important group of employees.

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Have What It Takes To Win In A Post-Digital World?

Carlton Doty

We had a fantastic event last week in New York, as 750+ marketing leaders converged on Forrester’s Marketing 2016. The big theme this year was how to succeed as a marketer in a post-digital world.

What’s “post-digital” you ask? Well, we’re living in that world today and it’s time to acknowledge it. Digital technology is embedded in our daily lives as consumers, as professionals – as human beings. I opened the event describing how marketing evolves in three phases: The pre-digital era was characterized by a mass-media centric, one-to-many approach; the digital era ushered in a data-driven, one-to-one mantra; and today we’re in a post-digital world, and your success will be determined by your ability to adapt to one-to-moment marketing.

The digital distinction now dissolves into our daily lives. This raises the stakes for marketers because your customers aren’t just empowered by digital technology – they’re actually entitled. They think they deserve something, they want it now, and if you can’t provide it, they will quickly find it somewhere else. Forrester and industry speakers explored this phenomenon over the course of our 2-day forum. Here are the top 5 key takeaways from last week:

1. Adopt A Post-Digital Mindset.

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What Do B2B Marketers Really Do? Forrester Wants To Know

Laura Ramos

Have you ever wondered about the tactical challenges B2B marketers (like you) face across role responsibilities like building brand/awareness, generating qualified demand, nurturing leads into qualified sales opportunities, enabling sales/channel partners to better close business, and expanding current customer relationships? 

Or how your practices around technology adoption, process change, modern marketing skill development, and sales alignment compare to peers?

If you tell us -- we will tell you more in return.

Many of you read our blog and research, or talk to us during inquiries, about best practices.  We have deep experience helping many clients strategize and execute on many aspects of modern marketing, but sometimes it's great to have some fresh input all at once.  Therefore, the B2B marketing research team has fielded a survey to take an indepth look at the state of B2B marketing tactics and sales enablement activity.   We hope you will take about 10 to 15 minutes to share your experiences by clicking here.

All responses will be kept confidential and results reported in the aggregate (so no one can figure out who's leading and who's lagging!)

We planned to close the survey last Friday, but would LOVE to hear from a few more of you to help us get a nice healthy sample.  And if you want Matt Camuso (our RA working on the survey) to stop badgering your with all those emails, now's the time to take the survey!

Time runs out officially this Friday, May 6 at 5 pm ET. Take this Survey!  Or the dog gets it.... (c'mon, you remember National Lampoon?)

Announcing Forrester’s Latest Latin America Online Retail Forecast

Lily Varon

It’s been a big news year for eCommerce in Latin America: Brazil’s economic instability has tempered eCommerce growth, elections in Argentina have raised hopes that favorable regulatory changes are ahead, and Amazon’s entry into Mexico has shone the spotlight on the region’s fastest growing market.  According to Forrester’s recently published forecast, online retail sales in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico (the region’s three largest markets) will reach $30.9 billion by 2020, up from $20.8 billion in 2015. Some key findings from this research include:

  • Brazil remains the region’s dominant eCommerce market. Brazil’s online retail sales today are more than double those for Mexico and Argentina combined. Despite economic (and political) woes, online sales are growing, and the market shows signs of maturity:  Online shoppers in Brazil span social classes and buy across categories – with categories like apparel and footwear gaining a larger share of the overall online retail sales pie.  
  • Macroeconomic conditions in Argentina have presented obstacles to eCommerce growth. Tight import restrictions enacted in 2012 made importing products extremely expensive and kept foreign investment in the market at bay. The newly elected government appears to be working towards loosening up these restrictions, though little has changed so far. Local traditional retailers are driving eCommerce growth and increasingly adding omnichannel capabilities for consumers. For example, traditional retailer Falabella offers customers visibility into store inventory, and flexible fulfillment options like multiple pick up sites or buy online pick up in store.
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Banks: Your Customers’ Cross-Channel Experiences Are Shoddy (Or Worse)

Peter Wannemacher

Note: If you’re a Forrester client, you can jump straight to the full report here.

The other day, I stopped by my bank’s ATM to get some cash. After entering my card and PIN and while waiting for my money (during which I was a captive audience), I was presented with an ad for a new service from the bank. Unfortunately, the ad’s call-to-action was a message telling me to call the bank’s 1-800 number to find out more.

I had just encountered one of the broken or inadequate cross-channel experiences that millions of customers face every year.

This is a lose-lose situation: In this case, the bank knew — or should have known — a heck of a lot about me as a customer, yet it failed to use context* to design a better experience and guide me seamlessly across touchpoints. And as a result, the bank also failed to cross-sell me any products or services.

Forrester defines cross-channel behavior as any instance in which a customer or prospect moves from one touchpoint to another when completing an objective. Today, cross-channel goes way beyond online-to-offline transitions; going forward, these interactions will only increase in frequency and importance. Digital executives at banks are left with a tangle of customer journeys across various touchpoints (see image below).

In our new report, Design Better Cross-Channel Banking Journeys, we show that:

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Why More Is More

James McQuivey

"Thank you for coming to this urgent, last-minute meeting today," I say to you and seven of our mutual colleagues. Pointing to a plate of 10 cookies on the table between us, I explain, "We're in luck, though. As a reward for your willingness to squeeze this meeting in, I have managed to sneak some cookies out of the executive meeting next door!"

We all smile, and that look on your face tells me that you already feel better about this meeting than you did just minutes ago. As I drone on about the urgent topic of the meeting, your mind does the math. Counting you and me, there are nine of us. It doesn't take much to figure out that there is at least one cookie for everyone in the room. Your brain signals a salivary response and depending on your current blood sugar levels, possibly a preemptive insulin release from the pancreas.

In other words, you begin to act like that cookie is yours. If I were to survey you at that moment about how appetizing the cookies seem and how much you expect to enjoy yours, you and the others might collectively estimate the cookies at 6.5 on a scale from 1 to 10. Good cookies, to be sure.

That's when a knock is heard at the door and someone enters — a confederate of mine, though you don't know this — who explains that they made a mistake in letting me take the cookies. In fact, the executives ran out of cookies, and they need eight of them back. I apologize, take two cookies from the plate and put them on a napkin for us to keep. My confederate leaves the room with the eight other cookies.

If I survey you now and ask you how appetizing the two cookies left on the table appear, what do you think happens to your estimate? If you guessed that your desire for the cookies goes up, you are in tune with human nature. Indeed, the average score for the cookies will be higher, coming in at more like 7.5, even though the cookies did not change.

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How To Transform Your Organization Into A Customer Experience Powerhouse

Keith Coe
In my previous blog, I discussed why customer experience is important and what the indicators are that your organization needs to transform itself and its customer experience. In this follow-up blog, I cover how an organization transforms to provide a better customer experience as well as lessons that we've learned from our consulting work.
 
Q: How does an organization begin to transform to provide a better customer experience? 
 
A: Transforming customer experience requires a strategy — a vision for what an organization wants the experience to be and a plan to make it happen. Customer experience professionals whom Forrester surveyed identified the lack of a clear strategy as the biggest obstacle to customer experience success. To overcome this obstacle, Forrester recommends a three-phased approach.
 
 
In practice, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach for transforming customer experience. And it’s not just the customer experience that needs to change. Oftentimes, so does the organization itself. It depends on the current situation as well as the nature and scope of the transformation needed. For example, does an organization need to reinvent to compete and lead in a rapidly changing sector? Is it trying to escape commoditization and build the competencies to stay ahead of the pack? Or is the challenge to repair critical customer journeys and better orchestrate customer experience management across functions?
 
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MARKETING 2016 Guest Q&A with Antonio Sciuto, Nestlé Waters

Carlton Doty

The customer journey is vital to success in the age of the customer, and as technology advances, collecting data can help personalize the experience from start to finish. At MARKETING this week, Antonio Sciuto, CMO of Nestlé Waters, will share insight into the company’s brand new ‘war room’ that displays real-time data showing customer journeys and tracking customer touchpoints.

You don’t want to miss Antonio’s talk on Tuesday afternoon. I had the chance to chat with him to get the inside scoop on how he’s leading his organization with a customer-obsessed mindset, from real-time data to customized customer journeys. Here’s what he had to say:

Q: Some may find it hard to see the applicability of customer journey analysis to a product as "simple" as bottled water. When did you first begin focusing on the customer journey? Why?

Antonio Sciuto: Digital is accelerating and changing several aspects of our lives.  In the US consumers are now spending 52% of total time on digital media channels. This is evolving the consumer journey shifting marketing focus from building databases to fostering communities. We aim to offer a seamless brand experience evolving from “simple” bottle water to healthy hydration solutions across all touch-points, online and offline.

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