OpenStack Matures With Havana: Good-Enough Monitoring & Orchestration

Dave Bartoletti

What’s our advice to those building out an internal cloud management practice? Don’t get overwhelmed by trying to revamp all of your IT management processes Day 1. Cloud’s not supposed to make things harder, remember. Keep three things in mind from the outset and you have the foundation for a cloud management practice: monitor, standardize, and automate.

What you monitor in your cloud dictates what you can manage, of course, so focus first on monitoring what you can control. In a private cloud, that means monitoring the compute, storage, and network resources you’re delivering as a service. In a public cloud, instrument your apps first. Then you need to standardize on a reasonable set of app and infrastructure templates you’ll offer to your cloud consumers. And finally you’ll need to automate the way you build instances of those templates on demand. These are the basics: monitor what you control, offer standardized services from a catalog, and automate how you deliver them.

This week’s OpenStack Summit in Hong Kong comes on the heels of the latest OpenStack release, called Havana. Havana includes two fully integrated projects that have been baking for a while, Ceilometer (monitoring and metering) and Heat (orchestration). These two enterprise-focused features aim to make it easier to build a real production-quality cloud on top of the OpenStack open source cloud building platform.

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Internet of Things World Forum In Barcelona Highlights Emerging Connected World Momentum

Michele Pelino

Last week, I attended the Internet of Things (IoT) World Forum event which was hosted by Cisco Systems in Barcelona, Spain. This inaugural event included more than 15 vendor sponsors such as AGT International, Oracle, IBM, SAP, and Zebra Technologies, and was attended by nearly 800 attendees including press and industry analysts. Breakout sessions addressed Internet of Things initiatives in industry, government, technology, education, and culture. A highlight of the event was a walking tour of the city of Barcelona, which is being transformed into a smart city.Examples of demonstrated IoT applications included: connected bus stops which provide citizens with real time travel information; smart parking sensors in on-street parking spaces to help citizens find open spaces via a smartphone application; and smart waste management solutions which incorporate sensors in street waste containers to monitor when the containers are full.  

A few key themes emerged from the conference. First, there is not a standard definition of the Internet of Things, however, there is a sense that the “time is now” for vendors, service providers, and organizations to participate in the Internet of Things market. In addition, there is a complex vendor and service provider ecosystem offering network infrastructure, devices, applications, and services built on multiple standards to address emerging demand for IoT solutions. Vendors and service providers must partner to develop user friendly IoT solutions, as well as clearly define and differentiate their IoT solution implementation capabilities.   

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itSMF FUSION 13 – GRADUATION AND REVOLUTION

Courtney Bartlett

Last week, Forrester’s Service Management and Automation team attended FUSION 13, an annual conference jointly hosted by itSMF USA  and HDI, in Nashville, Tennessee.  FUSION is a key conference for IT Service Management professionals - for three days ITSM pros are immersed in a content rich environment where they're encouraged to share knowledge and learn from one another, as well as from a plethora of industry experts, practitioners, vendors, and thought leaders alike.  It's impossible to leave without having made new friends and new discoveries in the realm of IT Service Management.  Approximately 2000 ITSM professionals attended the 2013 conference, with the theme "graduate to better service management."

The buzz of this year's event can be easily put into two terms: revolution and status quo.  Yes, you read that correctly.  And while these two terms are quite contradictory, when put into context they actually are somewhat related - don't worry, we'll explain.  First, the status quo:

At FUSION 13, we presented the results from our third annual ITSM survey Forrester does in conjunction with itSMF USA, and not much changed year-over-year.  Aside from a few minor rumblings, ITSM maintained the status quo, and in this case, no news... is news:

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We Need To Talk About IT Analytics

John Rakowski

Last week I attended the excellent FutureStack conference. This was the first customer conference by New Relic, the Application Performance Management (APM) and Monitoring company. It was great to see how passionate their customers are and how they realize the strategic importance of monitoring. Well done New Relic! The keynotes and track sessions at this event were great because they did not just focus on technology but addressed the future skills and competencies required for today’s business technology professional. 

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CSC Buys ServiceMesh for Hybrid Cloud Management

Dave Bartoletti

The independent ISV market for cloud automation software got smaller today with CSC’s announcement that it will acquire ServiceMesh. I’ve been predicting a take-out of ServiceMesh with my inquiry customers for months, but this was faster than I expected. In short, CSC has picked up one of the few independent hybrid/multi-cloud management vendors. The buy makes sense for several reasons:

CSC needs a unified service catalog, orchestration, and governance platform to pull together its successful and growing cloud business and enable faster enterprise cloud migrations to its multiple cloud offerings (public, virtual private, private). The enterprise evolution to cloud is step-wise – some apps, some infrastructure, and some business units – and buyers need a partner to help decide which makes the most sense to migrate first, and how. CSC can combine its strong managed services capabilities and IT management tools expertise with the application lifecycle (DevOps) focus of ServiceMesh to reach a powerful cloud buyer: the app owner and developer. Apps are where the cloud action is.

CSC wants to maintain some degree of cloud neutrality, and ServiceMesh has built its reputation as a cloud-neutral governance and orchestration platform. ServiceMesh focuses first on applications and services, and leaves infrastructure management to the cloud providers. CSC gains a neutral multi-cloud (read hybrid) orchestration suite and ServiceMesh gets the ability to scale on the back of CSC’s global services footprint. I’ve been waiting for some new marquee customers for the ServiceMesh Agility platform and hope the partnership will bear fruit quickly.

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Four Common Approaches To Private Cloud

Lauren Nelson

In 2012, I wrote a blog titled Private Cloud: 'Everyone's Got One, Where's Yours?' which looked at the perception of private cloud versus the reality of the environments that carry this name. Although reported interest and adoption were high, most environments fell short of the basic characteristics of cloud. Almost 1.5 years later, Forrester continues to see interest in and reported adoption of private cloud -- according to Forrester's Hardware Survey, in 2014, 55% of North American and European enterprises plan to prioritize building an internal private cloud, and 33% already having adopted private cloud. Despite the increased awareness in private cloud shortcomings, Forrester found that only 1/4 of these "private cloud" environments establish self-service access for its users. What's most interesting is that most of these enterprises aren't looking to private cloud for cloud-specific benefits. 

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Four Common Approaches To Private Cloud

Lauren Nelson

In 2012, I wrote a blog titled Private Cloud: 'Everyone's Got One, Where's Yours?' which looked at the perception of private cloud versus the reality of the environments that carry this name. Although reported interest and adoption were high, most environments fell short of the basic characteristics of cloud. Almost 1.5 years later, Forrester continues to see interest in and reported adoption of private cloud -- according to Forrester's Hardware Survey, in 2014, 55% of North American and European enterprises plan to prioritize building an internal private cloud, and 33% already having adopted private cloud. Despite the increased awareness in private cloud shortcomings, Forrester found that only 1/4 of these "private cloud" environments establish self-service access for its users. What's most interesting is that most of these enterprises aren't looking to private cloud for cloud-specific benefits. 

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Seagate's Kinetic Will Impact Object Storage And Data Driven Applications

Henry Baltazar

Seagate's recent Kinetic Open Storage platform unveiling is making hard drive based technology interesting again.  The Kinetic platform essentially turns hard drives into individual key value stores, and allows applications and hosts to directly access Kinetic drives over TCP/IP networks.  Processing power within the drives is used to run the key value store, and the Kinetic technology also facilitates policy based drive-to-drive data migration.  If this storage architecture is commercially successful it will be extraordinarly disruptive since the direct connectivity from drives to applications will eliminate storage controllers, file systems, SANs and even RAID from the storage data path.  Developer kits for Kinetic are available today, though Seagate will not be making the drives generally available until 2014.  I'll be publishing a more in-depth report for Forrester clients on our site in the future, but for now there are a number of key points to be aware of as this technology ramps up:

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Indian Organizations Embrace Mobile Applications For Employee Enablement, But Must Also Target External Customers

Katyayan Gupta

From June to August 2013, Forrester invited large and medium-size organizations in India to share details about their live enterprise mobility applications. Our objective was to understand how Indian organizations are leveraging mobile applications to better connect with customers, partners, and employees. In total, we received details of 59 mobile application projects from 41 organizations with more than 500 employees in India. These organizations are spread across verticals like manufacturing, financial services, automotive, media, healthcare, professional services, telecommunications, and utilities. Our research provided some interesting findings:

  • Mobile application development is skewed toward internal, employee-facing projects. Among the projects reviewed, 59% of the enterprise mobility applications have been developed for internal employees, 23% target customers, and the remaining 18% are for business partners. Most organizations in India are first developing applications for employees, because calculating the ROI is easier and more tangible for employee-centric applications as compared with customer- or business partner -centric applications. For instance, sales force/field force automation is currently the most commonly developed mobile application by Indian organizations.
  • The majority of projects are co-owned by IT and business. 71% of the enterprise mobility application projects we covered are jointly owned by the IT team and the relevant business stakeholders. Business inputs, especially on user interface and experience, are key to ensuring adoption of mobile application post-launch.
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Cloud computing and highly secure data DO mix

James Staten

Every client (especially every government client) who says I’ll never use cloud services with highly secure data needs to hear this story. In no more sensitive a place than law enforcement is just such a value proposition playing out.

Police departments in 18 states in the US, and soon Canada, are dramatically increasing the efficiency of commercial use of highways through a disruptive SaaS solution that costs a fraction of the incumbent service and mixes well with their permitting and inspection databases.

If you drive toll roads or bridges you know the value of Drivewyze. In rush hour, you can wait 10-25 minutes to pay your toll with cash or you can sign up for an electronic toll system that lets you breeze past. Drivewyze does the same for commercial trucks and fleets but not at toll booths but weigh stations, that take much longer to get through. And in the trucking business every minute lost at a weigh station can cost thousands of dollars in lost delivery time.  For law enforcement the value is even higher as any time lost inspecting a safe truck is time not spent stopping an unsafe one.

The system works by helping known-good drivers and trucks register with the weigh station wirelessly as they approach it on the highway, get an all-clear, then drive right by. Trucks send their credentials to the weigh stations using any mobile device they happen to have – iPhone, Android, Blackberry. Anything with a cellular connection will do the trick. At the weigh station, they receive the information about the driver over whatever equipment they have – aging PCs and laptops are most common. The system checks each driver and truck against long-standing databases of safety records, expired licenses, past weigh station checks and other information that would indicate an unsafe driving circumstance.

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