The Top Tech Trends To Watch: 2016 To 2018 — Should Help Accelerate CIOs’ BT Agenda

Bobby Cameron

CIOs already face significant pressure to understand and respond to digitally empowered customers. And as their firms’ customer experience (CX) focus intensifies, CIOs must bring digital into the heart of customer engagements — leveraging technology to assure high value end to end across the customer life cycle.

The next wave of tech trends to watch — 2016 to 2018 — support tech management’s move to the heart of digital CX implementation. Today’s mainstream CX investment path has individual organizations making point investments in the latest technology inventions — like social, mobile, big data, cloud, and analytics. But today’s leading firms are delivering solutions that reach end to end across customers’ journeys and across systems that connect the employees who service the customer life cycle. And these trends will accelerate over the next three years.

We see the top tech trends making this shift in three phases from 2016 through 2018:

■        Visionaries will dominate dawning phase trends as they drive point inventions to address specific business organizations’ opportunities.

■        Fast followers will discover the limits of point solutions in the awareness phase and begin to work through the challenges of end-to-end innovation.

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Data Governance and Data Management Are Not Interchangeable

Michele Goetz

Since when did data management and data governance become interchangeable?

This is a question that has both confounded and frustrated me.  The pursuit of data management vendors to connect with business stakeholders, because of the increasing role business units have had in decison making and holding the purse strings to technology purchases, means data governance as a term was hijacked to snuff out the bad taste of IT data projects gone sour. 

The funny thing is, vendors actually began drinking their own marketing Kool-aid and think of their MDM, quality, security, and lifecycle management products as data governance tools/solutions.  Storage and virtualizations vendors are even starting to grock on to this claiming they govern data. Big data vendors jumped over data management altogether and just call their catalogs, security, and lineage capabilities data governance.  

Yes, this is a pet peeve of mine - just as data integration is now called blending, and data cleansing and transformation is now called wrangling or data preparation. But more on that is another blog...

First, you (vendor or data professional) cannot simply sweep the history of legacy data investments that were limited in results and painful to implement under the MadMen carpet. Own it and address the challenges through technology innovation rather than words.

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BI and data integration professionals face a multitude of overlapping data preparation options

Boris Evelson

Ah, the good old days. The world used to be simple. ETL vendors provided data integration functionality, DBMS vendors data warehouse platforms and BI vendors concentrated on reporting, analysis and data visualization. And they all lived happily ever after without stepping on each others’ toes and benefiting from lucrative partnerships. Alas, the modern world of BI and data integration is infinitely more complex with multiple, often overlapping offerings from data integration and BI vendors. I see the following three major segments in the market of preparing data for BI:

  1. Fully functional and highly scalable ETL platforms that are used for integrating analytical data as well as moving, synchronizing and replicating operational, transactional data. This is still the realm of tech professionals who use ETL products from Informatica, AbInitio, IBM, Oracle, Microsoft and others.
  2. An emerging market of data preparation technologies that specialize mostly in integrating data for BI use cases and mostly run by business users. Notable vendors in the space include Alteryx, Paxata, Trifecta, Datawatch, Birst, and a few others.
  3. Data preparation features built right into BI platforms. Most leading BI vendors today provide such capabilities to a varying degree.
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OpenStack Is Now Ready For Business

Paul Miller

The open source cloud computing project, OpenStack, has a reputation as a bit of a science project; technologically interesting, fine for those who don’t mind getting their hands dirty, but not something that normal companies are going to depend upon for anything serious or important.

That reputation, although possibly justifiable a year or two back, really doesn’t stand up to close scrutiny anymore. And that’s what my very first (short) Forrester report argues.

OpenStack is now ready for business, but implementation is not without its challenges.

As part of the selection process here at Forrester, prospective analysts prepare a short report in the Forrester style. They also deliver a presentation based upon that report, and defend their hypothesis in the face of some pointed questioning.

An earlier version of this report was my interview piece, which I wrote back in June. The tone and broad argument remain pretty true to the original, but a number of my new colleagues proved invaluable in deepening arguments, augmenting assertions with more data, and enriching the whole with extra endnotes and links to additional resources. Lauren Nelson, in particular, contributed a wealth of material gathered during her own work for May’s longer OpenStack Is Ready - Are You? Today’s document may have begun life as ‘mine’ (cue Gollum impression), but the piece that Forrester clients can now download is very much a team effort. This, I hear, will be a recurring theme here!

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Forrester’s Security & Risk Spotlight – Chris Sherman

Stephanie Balaouras

Forrester’s Security & Risk Analyst Spotlight - Chris Sherman

The title hasn’t yet been put to client vote, but Chris Sherman may be the renaissance man of Forrester’s S&R team. As an analyst, Chris advises clients on data security across all endpoints, giving him a broad perspective on current security trends. His experience as a neuroscience researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital also gives him insight into the particular challenges that Forrester’s clients in the healthcare industry face. Lastly, when he hasn’t been writing about endpoint security strategy or studying neural synapse firings, Chris flies Cessna 172’s around New England. Listen to this week’s podcast to learn about recent themes in Chris’s client inquiries as well as the troubles facing a particular endpoint security technology.

Chris Sherman Image

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The Breathtaking Future of Software Development -- It's Already Here!

Michael Facemire

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" -- William Gibson

I recently drove a Tesla for the first time. As a kid that grew up in a car dealership (my father and grandfather both owned one) I grew up with a love of cars, speed, and pushing limits. Driving that Tesla changed everything; as a developer I'm starting to feel a experience a similar set of feelings. Developers love change -- and technology provides a constant stream of bright shiny objects for us to chase. Fortunately we're being blessed by many of these objects to chase lately -- to the point that the current velocity of change _around everything we do_ is starting to take my breath away! I equate it to driving a Tesla at the edge of ludicrous mode; incredibly exciting with the knowledge that one false step means sure peril. The areas that are currently exciting me are:
The Web plumbing is changing. Earlier this year the Internet Archive put out a call to help building the new distributed web. They point to a number of challenges around the current web -- it's fragile, not reliable, not private, and needs a way to keep track of changes over time. Fortunately some early options are appearing about that I'm digging into, particularly Ethereum, IPFS, Blockchain, and HTTP/2. Each of these brings significant change to how we build, deploy, and scale applications.
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The Predictive Modeling Process Using Machine Learning

Mike Gualtieri

Predictive analytics uses statistical and machine learning algorithms to find aptterns in data that might predict similar outcomes in the future. Check out this less than 3 minute, fun and fruity video to understand the six steps of predictive modeling.  For tools that use machine learning to build predictive models, Forrester clients can read The Forrester Wave: Big Data Predictive Analytics Solutions, Q2 2015 and A Machine Learning Primer For BT Professionals.

The Top Technology Trends To Watch: 2016 To 2018

Brian  Hopkins

Enterprise architects face more exciting — and greater — challenges as the age of the customer takes off. But technology invention, innovation, and spending are notoriously cyclical. In fact, our first tech trends report in 2009 predicted a boom cycle through 2016. And we have seen this — with social, mobile, cloud, analytics, and big data, to name just the obvious ones. A big finding of our research however is this: The Age Of The Customer has changed the classic technology investment cycle.  For example, technology management’s spend will grow about 5% in North America in 2016. This is a decent pace. However, spend on business technology — the things that let firms win, serve, and retain customers — will be double that!

All this new money will shift the focus of investment from point solution inventions toward “end-to-end innovation” by 2018. And by end-to-end, we mean across the customer life-cycle and customer journeys as opposed to classic 'enterprise integration'. This shift will happen in three phases:

  • Visionaries will dominate dawning phase trends as they drive point inventions to address specific business organizations’ opportunities.
  • Fast followers will discover the limits of point solutions in the awareness phase and begin to work through them.
  • Enterprises will shift investment toward integrating capabilities across the customer life cycle in the acceptance phase.
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Huawei’s ICT Summit Shows Digital Transformation Redefining Oil & Gas

Bobby Cameron

It’s easy to see digital transformation playing a major role in consumer-facing firms. Digital customer experience sits at the core of retail — through Web sites, mobile devices, and increased focus on customer experience across the complete engagement cycle. However, it might be surprising for many how digital technology transforms core process industries like oil & gas.

At Huawei’s Global Energy Industry Summit 2015 — held this past August 19 in Almaty, Kazakhstan — the impact of digital to this traditional industry was the key topic. At this conference I gave a keynote, prepared with my colleague Holger Kisker, on the major industry trends and the challenges and opportunities of the digital business transformation in oil & gas. The current deep price drop for oil has focused firms on rapid and targeted response to increasingly dynamic markets of hydrocarbon supply and demand.

Some roles in the sector have a natural ability to thrive in price drops — like refiners, distributors, and retailers. But the closer you get to production, the tougher it is to stay whole. And this is where digital comes in. Firms that can dynamically react to volatile market needs — with growing operational efficiency — can meet market and customers’ changing expectations and still make money. And digital is at the core of this capability.

These challenges in oil production operations clearly highlight problems, like the aging workforce, leaving gaps across the industry. But filling the biggest operational gap will, at the same time, open the biggest door. Take, for example, the absence of modern remote sensor equipment at the majority of wells. When production falls off, many pumps must be checked by people traveling into the field to determine the cause. It’s costly, slow, and misses critical information like reduced cred pressure and production volumes.

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Blackberry says: "I'm Not Dead YET!"

Tyler Shields

Once proud Unicorn company Good Technology has been acquired by Blackberry for $475M. This transaction was annouced Friday 9/4/15 and has been a buzzworthy topic in the mobile security arena ever since. The acquisition demonstrates Blackberry's continued resolve to execute on a software centered strategic turn around plan. This acquisition is the biggest in Blackberry history and is an excellent fit in both features as well as company DNA. Blackberry refuses to die and is making major moves, such as this, to expand it's position in a market that will only be lucrative to the leading few vendors. It's going to be feast or famine for Blackberry going forward.

Blackberry and Good are both security minded companies having created similar solutions based on full stack security. Everything from network operations centers up through application layer security controls were implemented, albeit in different delivery platforms. Both offerings have fallen on hard times in the recent past with Blackberry having difficulty overcoming its failures in the hardware space and Good falling prey to a rapidly commoditizing market around mobile management technologies. 

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