Reflections On Huawei’s Analyst Summit 2017 — Past, Present, And Future

Dan Bieler

In April 2017, Huawei hosted its annual Analyst Summit in Shenzhen, China. Huawei’s financial year 2016 was remarkable as the group grew revenues by 32% to US$ 75 billion, making Huawei the largest global network solutions vendor by revenues, way ahead of its traditional competitors Cisco, Nokia, and Ericsson. This calls for some reflections about Huawei’s journey, its past achievements, and its current focus areas. This will help us to understand where Huawei might be heading in the future.

I have been following Huawei for over 10 years. Over this short timeframe, I have seen Huawei grow into the largest global telco network infrastructure vendor, becoming a leading global smartphone manufacturer, migrating from a low-cost hardware manufacturer toward an innovative product developer, ramping up its service capabilities, moving into delivering products and services to the enterprise segment, and pushing into software development.

These achievements underline that Huawei has achieved an awful lot since rising from its humble beginnings as a producer of phone switches in Shenzhen in 1987. For years, its core competitors have underestimated the capabilities and determination of Huawei to succeed. At the Huawei Analyst Summit 2017, I picked up three key focus areas for Huawei in 2017:

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Not too late to catch Digital Transformation Forum, 2017

Stephen Powers

The moment of truth for your digital re-invention has arrived. Digital technology has rendered your legacy systems obsolete, and has liberated your customers to adopt - and abandon - your offerings at a moment’s notice. You already know it’s time to change. You need to transform your firm to meet your customers’ expectations and ensure flexibility for the future. For hungry companies, the idea of "digital transformation" is an opportunity to expose new business opportunities, evolve operations, and grow.

Next week in Chicago, on May 9-10, Digital Transformation Forum 2017 will help you lay out the next steps in your digital strategy. It will feature sessions where leaders from companies such as Allstate, Bloomingdale’s, Gap, GE Oil & Gas, Expedia, Nespresso, Visa, and AIG will tell stories of how they helped their firms digitally transform and what they learned. In addition, Forrester analysts will present sessions on how you can:

  • See the big picture. Martin Gill will frame Digital Transformation as an enterprise-wide initiative – and one that can’t wait.
  • Engage your customers on any platform. Julie Ask will show how amorphous channels will house your firms’ digital customer interactions in the future and help you plan to add value and win customers through better experiences.
  • Mature your AI strategy from novelty to strategic advantage. Rob Koplowitz will introduce Forrester’s framework for developing the next generation of human/machine interactions.
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Bimodal IT Is Past Its Due Date: Providing Speed And Innovation Need To Top The CIO's Agenda

Tim Sheedy

Many CIOs have embraced bimodal IT as a way to create relevance for the technology organization in the age of the customer. With marketing, CX, and other teams increasingly building their own development teams or turning to outside agencies for their technology needs, CIOs have recognized that they need to help drive fast change, not be a source of friction. They also need to be a source of innovation for the business. Many CIOs took a shortcut to this end and created a “fast” IT function that sat parallel to the “slow” IT function — and hence bimodal IT was born.

However, most CIOs now recognize that all of the technology team and function needs to be fast. Yes, some systems change less often than others, but all change needs to be fast. There is no longer an appetite for long, drawn-out, technology-led changes. There is no longer a place for slow IT. Testing can’t delay launches; security can’t add months to a project; perfect can’t get in the way of fast. CIOs are taking steps to create a tech function that moves at the speed of the customer and helps drive innovation for customers, partners, and employees. They are starting to create a true business technology function. Here’s what leading CIOs are doing to drive this change and move away from bimodal IT:

  • They are creating a vision of the new empowered customer future and selling this to their team, the board, and the rest of the business to get buy-in for the changes they are making across their team.
  • They are transforming the culture, skills, technology, and metrics of the technology team. Start with the vision and inspire the team to change, or start with the metrics and drag them along with you — either way, these changes are essential.
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Forrester Methodology To Select Business Intelligence Implementation Service Providers

Boris Evelson

Business Intelligence (BI) pros continue to look for outside professional services. Forty-nine percent of decision makers say their firms are already engaging and/or expanding their engagements with outside data and analytic service providers, and another 22% plan to do so in the next 12 months. There are two main reasons for this sustained trend:

  • The breadth and depth of BI deployments cannot be internally replicated at scale. Delivering widely adopted and effective BI solutions is not easy. It requires rigor in methodology, discipline in execution, the right resources, and the application of numerous best practices. No internal enterprise tech organization can claim this wealth of expertise and experience; this only comes after delivering thousands of successful and unsuccessful BI projects — which we believe is solely the realm of management consultants and systems integrators. These partners have collectively accumulated such experience over many years and thousands of clients and projects.
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Security Challenges Drive Growth For IAM Solutions

Jennifer Adams

The world is changing fast, and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) and telecommuting are increasingly becoming the norm, not the exception. This increasingly mobile and flexible workforce creates new security challenges as more and different types of devices are being used in multiple locations. Security and risk professionals must ensure that only the right people get access to the right information at the right time and for the right reasons. Identity and access management (IAM) tools help evaluate who has authorized access to which resources and why.

In our recently published Forrester Data: World Identity And Access Management Software Forecast, 2016 To 2021 (Global), Forrester predicts that the IAM software market will grow to $13.3 billion by 2021, from $7.7 billion in 2016, implying an 11.5% CAGR.

While IAM has traditionally focused on access for employees and business partners, we actually expect customer identity access management (CIAM) to be one of the fastest growing IAM niches. CIAM requires a delicate balance between security measures that are strong enough but don’t detract from the customer experience. As a bonus, data collected by CIAM tools can help with customer retention and drive profitability. As companies learn to leverage this data, we expect 19.5% annual CIAM software growth over the next five years.

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For Better Security Operations, Speak to the Pack in its Native Tongue

Chase Cunningham

I have a huge German Shepherd that ranks only slightly behind my human children when it comes to being spoiled and how much attention he gets.  I’ve been working on training him for nearly a year now, and he amazes me with how intelligent he is. He knows all the basics: sit, stay, here, lay down, etc. But he also picked up detecting scents very quickly and is learning to detect things with his nose that I can’t even see with my eyes. And he does all of these things faster than most kids learn to break the Netflix password.  

The other day, working with him on his training points, I thought to myself, “Woah, my dog speaks human.” Not just English either. He speaks German (that’s the language he's trained in), and he totally understands it. I realized the problem is that I don't speak “Dog.” My dog knows about 30 human words, and they are words in a language his master has no business trying to pronounce, mind you. But he knows what those words mean, and he gets the tasking or request down every time they're uttered. He could look at me for an hour and bark, growl, howl, yip, or yelp constantly, and he could be telling me the cure for cancer and I wouldn’t know it.  

OK that’s interesting, but what does it have to do with better communication among techies?

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DevOps, Invest For Velocity And Quality!

Robert Stroud

Delivering exceptional customer experiences and product for your business take speed and flexibility. More than ever before, speed and flexibility are required from every part of your organization, business and IT alike. DevOps provides your business leaders, enterprise architects, developers and I&O leaders a philosophy to achieve, not only the velocity that customers desire but also drive innovation and enforces quality. One example is ING. The company is undergoing a major digital transformation in which DevOps is a primary driver supporting their transformation. ING CIO Ron van Kemenade has initiated DevOps as the vehicle to aggressively support ING’s evolving customer needs. At ING, technology is the beating heart of the bank.[i]

DevOps requires a transition from technical silos to product centered teams

Effective DevOps will require the tearing down of the technology based silos within an organization.  Instead, teams need to focus on the products (or service) delivered and be empowered to own the complete lifecycle.  Key performance metrics such as such as availability, the number of features added are used to measure the speed and quality of how these product centered teams work.  In some organizations, the team may even own support of the designed and delivered services.  This integrated product team is a fusion of developers, infrastructure & operations, quality assurance, and release managers into a single team that works on the entire pipeline, from commit to deployment. Existing centers of excellence such as DBA’s or security teams will remain and support the DevOps team; in some cases, they might even be allocated to the team for a particular duration. [ii]

Deconstruct silos of automation and replace with full pipeline automation

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Check Out The New Forrester Wave™ Of Leading DRaaS Providers

Naveen  Chhabra

I am pleased to announce that the new Forrester Wave™: Disaster-Recovery-as-a-Service Providers, Q2 2017 for infrastructure and operations professionals is now live! This Wave evaluation uncovered a market in which four providers — Sungard Availability Services, Bluelock, IBM, and iland — all emerged as Leaders, although their strengths differ. Another five providers — HPE Enterprise Services (now DXC Technology), Recovery Point, Plan B, Daisy, and TierPoint — are Strong Performers. NTT Communications is a Contender.

To evaluate these vendors, we developed a comprehensive set of criteria in three high-level buckets: current offering, strategy, and market presence. The criteria and their weightings are based on past research and user inquiries. In addition to typical user demands, this Forrester Wave™ evaluation also has a few thought-provoking criteria such as the provider’s capability to deliver security services, real-time views through a readiness score, automated change management, and orchestration-led enterprise application recovery.

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Demise of OpenStack Innovation Center does not mean demise of OpenStack

Paul Miller

The ever-dependable Barb Darrow at Fortune reported late last week that the OpenStack Innovation Center (OSIC) is to shut down. Cue wailing, gnashing of teeth, and portents of doom. But this may not be quite so bad as it appears, because the OpenStack Innovation Center isn’t nearly so critical to the open source cloud computing project as its name might imply.

Before I joined Forrester I used to post a short thought (almost) every day, commenting on some piece of news that caught my interest. The last of these, on 24 July 2015, was concerned with the then-new OpenStack Innovation Center.

I was unimpressed.

You see, the OpenStack Innovation Center isn’t an initiative of the OpenStack Foundation. Despite the name, it was only a joint initiative of two contributors to the OpenStack project - Intel and (OpenStack co-founder) Rackspace. They set up some clusters, for developers to test code. And they did some work to make OpenStack more enterprise-ready. Both efforts were useful, for sure. But both of these things were already happening in plenty of other places.

To call this useful but far-from-unique contribution the OpenStack Innovation Center seemed - to me - unwise. It almost - to me - smacked of hubris. It was a bit silly. It was another example of marketing spin far exceeding any discernible reality on the ground.

Now? It seems an own-goal that the Foundation and its backers might so easily have side-stepped.

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A One-Year I&O Transformation

Milan Hanson

Back when I worked in I&O we weren’t very popular. Not personally, mind you, but as a team. Why? Because we seldom satisfied user requests quickly, and sometimes not at all.  We were the defenders of stability, resistant to change.  Just maintaining the technology every day - “keeping the lights on” - took a lot of manual effort.  We chased down a lot of defects, and then we struggled to get fixes created and put into production. Sometimes the fix created a worse problem. It wasn’t a lot of fun, the pressure was grueling, and one by one we moved on to other jobs.

So today when I tell clients about transforming I&O from an under-appreciated cost center to a respected strategic advisor, I understand their skepticism. What does it take? For starters:

  • You have to change the monitoring and analytics technology.
  • You have to change the attitudes of the people within I&O.
  • You have to change the perception of I&O across the organization.

Those are not small changes, and cultural changes move especially slowly. Or do they?

The I&O team at Dixons Carphone, a UK technology retailer, transformed in a year. Yes, one year. With a motto of “say yes more,” Dixons Carphone I&O went all-in on customer focus and agile operations:

  • Rather than using a lengthy RFP process, monitoring technology proven effective in one business unit was extended across the organization.
  • Rather than focusing on technology health, the focus was shifted to customer experience.
  • Rather than focusing solely on the needs of consumer customers, attention was also given to the needs of internal users, line-of-business managers, and executives.
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