Twitter, Tweet-Up - Where Does One Start When You Want To Get It Right?

Natalie L. Petouhoff, Ph.D. By Dr. Natalie Petouhoff

Everyone is A Beginner At the Beginning


So many of you came to the @CRMe09 conference where I spoke about the ROI of Social Media, in particular that derived from customer service. And a funny thing that happened there... Lithium had a booth in the exhibitors area and they had asked me to come and speak to people about my ROI model. So there I was ready to impart my wisdom. A man came up and saw the flyer on the table - it was for the Tweet-up. He picked up the flyer and asked me to tell him about Tweet-up.

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A Day In The Life Of An Information Worker

Ted Schadler

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

How do information workers -- people that use computers or smartphones in their job -- spend their days?

We set out to answer that question using our new Workforce Technographics(R) data. In our launch survey to understand how regular people use computers, smartphones, and applications to get their work done, we surveyed 2,001 people in the US with jobs in which they use a computer. We asked about all kinds of things, including how much time they spend with their computers and phones, which applications they use daily or even hourly, what applications they find indispensable, whether they work mostly with other employees or with customers or partners, and much more.

Our first report is a quick snapshot of a day in the life of an information worker (iWorker). (We'll be sharing a lot more data at a Webinar on Thursday at 11 AM ET; register here.) For example, did you know that:

  • Gen X (not Gen Y) is the most likely to use Web 2.0 technology to get their job done?

  • Smartphones are available to only 11% of US information workers?

  • Email is still the only application used on an hourly basis by most iWorkers?

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Oracle On Demand Gets Customer Service Knowledge Management with Integration with Inquira

Natalie L. Petouhoff, Ph.D. By Dr. Natalie Petouhoff

Knowledge Management and Customer Service


This quarter I've started some research on knowledge management (KM) for the contact center and customer service. This is KM for both agent-assited and self-service. One of the biggest misnomers about customer service is how important great knowledge management is to good experiences. And no, I don't mean Sharepoint. That's a fine product- but for customer service- one needs to find answers and not documents.


Customers often wonder - why, when they do a search on a website or when they ask a customer service agent for help- they wonder why the search results are awful- meaning nothing that got pulled up in the search was even remotely what they needed. And they also wonder why the agents don't have THE answer.

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Analysis from Microsoft TechEd 2009 - Take 1

Head Of BI Job Description

Boris Evelson

Boris Evelson By Boris Evelson

I get many requests from Forrester clients to describe job requirements for a head of BI team, department, solutions center, etc. While Forrester does not have a formal description of such requirements, if I map such requirements to all BI best practices that I write about, here’s what I come up with:

  • Champion and rally the organization around BI. Educate senior non-IT executives on the value of BI: without measurement, there’s no management. Be able to argue that business, not IT, should own BI.
  • Build and support BI business cases (BI ROI)
  • Understand Key Performance Measures and Indicators that drive company measurement, reporting and analytics across functions like
    • Sales  
    • Marketing  
    • Customer Service  
    • Finance  
    • Operations/Logistics  
    • HR  
    • IT/Systems  
    • Compliance and Risk Management  
  • Understand how these metrics and measures align and track against overall business strategies, goals and objectives.
  • Be proficient in all aspects of BI and Information Management processes, technologies and architectures such as
    • BI delivery mechanisms: portals, thin/thick clients, email/mobile phone alerts, etc  
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Gen Y and the Future of the Workplace: Recapping Our Discussion With Forrester Clients

TJ Keitt

Followers of my posts on this blog have seen a consistent theme: what does the influx of young workers mean for the present and future business world? Yesterday afternoon my colleagues Clarie Schooley and Heidi Shey joined me in hosting 82 Forrester clients for an open and frank discussion on this topic. The conversation, which included participants across the age spectrum, was spirited and landed on a few broad concepts:

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Social Technologies Will Drive The Next Wave Of BPM Suites

Clay Richardson

Clay-Richardson
By Clay Richardson

When you spend time taking a sober look at a market's maturity - like we did with our recently published BPM Tech Radar report - some technologies make you yawn, but then other technologies give you goose bumps.  The primary purpose of the BPM Tech Radar was to map the maturity of the 15 most critical technologies that make up the BPM landscape.  This included tried and true technologies such as workflow, process modeling, document imaging, and business rules; in addition to bleeding and leading edge technologies such as process data management and process mashups.  

 
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As Eclipse Kits for Cloud Arrive, Amazon Deployment Wins

John R. Rymer

Amazon's announcement on August 26th of its Eclipse toolkit added another Eclipse-cloud option for Java developers. Here is a table comparing these four: Amazon AWS Eclipse Toolkit, Google Plug-In for Eclipse, Stax Platform for Amazon EC2, and the planned next major release of SpringSource Cloud Foundry. (Cloud Foundry today provides a Web interface, but will embrace Eclipse.)
Eclipse cloud kits 

Several observations jump out at me:

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Consumer Market Research Techniques: A Primer For IT Professionals

Ted Schadler

Ted-Schadler by Ted Schadler

Employees are people, too.They just don't look like you. At least most of them don't. To understand what your workforce needs from technology and from you, you have to walk a mile in their shoes.

That's hard to do -- not to mention darn uncomfortable at times! But it is possible to get to know your workforce by grouping them by who they are and what they need from you. There are three techniques that consumer market researchers have developed over the last 40 years to do just that:

  1. Surveys to analyze and segment the workforce. This is step one and something that we'll drill into more detail on over the next few blog posts. Asking good questions, making sure everybody's represented, doing analysis that helps you answer your key questions, this is where the best analysis begins. You'll come up with segments like "technology enthusiasts" and "road warriors."

  2. Focus groups to bring the segments to life. Once the segments are identified, you can invite 5 or 6 people to come in and talk about what they do and what they need from technology. This gives you the "why" and the "how" to go along with the "what" that the survey and segmentation provide. With focus groups, a road warrior starts to look like a real person.

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When is a VMware cloud a vCloud? Let the API wars begin

James Staten

James StatenAttention enterprises Pop Quiz: If your favorite hosting provider launches a cloud service that supports VMware vSphere and is part of the VMware vCloud initative, are they providing you with the rich vCloud functionality VMware is touting at VMworld this week?

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