Succession Planning, What It Is and Why It's Important

Claire Schooley

In this podcast, Claire discusses the flow of activities that need to surround effective succession planning. She also talks about the key benefits of having a sound succession strategy. The podcast finishes with 5 key recommendations.

http://www.forrester.com/role_based/images/author/imported/forresterDotCom/Podcasts/BPA/Claire%20Schooley_Succession%20Planning_022410.mp3

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600 Tweets Per Second - A Tweet Too Many?

Nigel Fenwick

Twitter growth hits 50 million "Tweets" a day but just how much of that traffic is noise vs valuable information and does it really matter?

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Welcome To The Cloud Market, CA

James Staten

If anyone doubted CA Inc.’s intention to get into the cloud computing market, you can’t get away with that skepticism anymore. This company is serious. Its acquisition of early cloud leader 3Tera takes their nascent cloud entreaties to an entirely new level.

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Where Your Cloud Resides Matters

James Staten

Geographic location plays a significant role in establishing data protection obligations in the cloud. And while many cloud services originated within the US, growing demand, global competition, and practical business models drive vendor proliferation of cloud services hosted across diverse geographic locations.

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What will it take for firms to focus on data governance?

Tim Sheedy

 I am about to set off on a road show around Australia and New Zealand with IBM concerning data growth and data management. I am giving a presentation on data/information governance - which continues to be top of mind for many folks within the IT department - but to date, the data governance efforts of many organisations across the two countries have been pretty limited...
 

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NoSQL And Elastic Caching Platforms Are Kissing Cousins

Mike Gualtieri

The NoSQL Movement Is Gaining Momentum, But What The Heck Is It?

The NoSQL movement is a combination of an architectural approach for storing data and software products (such as Tokyo Cabinet, CouchDb, Redis) that can store data without using SQL. Thus the term NoSQL.

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There Won’t Be A Mobile Channel In Banking Anymore

Jost Hoppermann

The mobile channel is increasingly relevant in business strategies, application architectures and applications of financial services firms. Consequently, we are all aware that the headline represents a strong exaggeration. So, why this statement? Is there any substance in it that application architects, application developers, and enterprise architects need to consider? Interactions with a number of banks indicate that the answer is yes.

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HCM Acquisitions — Authoria and Peopleclick & SuccessFactors and Inform

Claire Schooley

In the last month the Human Capital Management market has consolidated with Authoria picking up Peopleclick and SuccessFactors acquiring Inform. Both acquisitions add product functionality with little or no product overlap. But this doesn’t mean integration will be easy. There are plenty of challenges ahead.

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The IT Career Path: A Dead End Or An Avenue To The Exec Suite?

Sharyn Leaver

IT-related jobs are set to grow through to 2016.

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The Fear Of Four... And The Future Of Fraud Detection

Chris McClean

I had a few great conversations yesterday about the increasing role analytics will play in risk and compliance programs, which brought to mind the article, For Some Firms, a Case of 'Quadrophobia' appearing earlier this week in the Wall Street Journal and referenced yesterday by the NY Times’ Freakonomics blog.

The article covers a study of quarterly earnings reports over a nearly 30 year period, which found a statistically low number of results ending in four-tenths of a cent. The implication here is that companies fudge their numbers slightly to report earnings ending in five-tenths, which can then be rounded up... clever. Even more interesting, authors of the study found that these “quadrophobes” are “more likely to restate financials and to be named as defendants in SEC Accounting and Auditing Enforcement Releases (AAER)”... not clever.

The report encourages the SEC to enhance its oversight with a new department dedicated solely to detailed quantitative analysis that might catch this type of behavior. It also occurs to me that many corporations would like to identify such trends within their four walls to detect and prevent potentially damaging behavior.

Clearly, the cultural/human aspects of risk management and compliance – policies, attestations, training, awareness, whistleblowing, etc. – are essential. But as the number and complexity of business transactions continue to grow, companies will be looking more and more for ways to analyze massive amounts of data for damaging patterns and trends.

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