Where Your Cloud Resides Matters

James Staten

Geographic location plays a significant role in establishing data protection obligations in the cloud. And while many cloud services originated within the US, growing demand, global competition, and practical business models drive vendor proliferation of cloud services hosted across diverse geographic locations.

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What will it take for firms to focus on data governance?

Tim Sheedy

 I am about to set off on a road show around Australia and New Zealand with IBM concerning data growth and data management. I am giving a presentation on data/information governance - which continues to be top of mind for many folks within the IT department - but to date, the data governance efforts of many organisations across the two countries have been pretty limited...
 

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NoSQL And Elastic Caching Platforms Are Kissing Cousins

Mike Gualtieri

The NoSQL Movement Is Gaining Momentum, But What The Heck Is It?

The NoSQL movement is a combination of an architectural approach for storing data and software products (such as Tokyo Cabinet, CouchDb, Redis) that can store data without using SQL. Thus the term NoSQL.

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There Won’t Be A Mobile Channel In Banking Anymore

Jost Hoppermann

The mobile channel is increasingly relevant in business strategies, application architectures and applications of financial services firms. Consequently, we are all aware that the headline represents a strong exaggeration. So, why this statement? Is there any substance in it that application architects, application developers, and enterprise architects need to consider? Interactions with a number of banks indicate that the answer is yes.

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HCM Acquisitions — Authoria and Peopleclick & SuccessFactors and Inform

Claire Schooley

In the last month the Human Capital Management market has consolidated with Authoria picking up Peopleclick and SuccessFactors acquiring Inform. Both acquisitions add product functionality with little or no product overlap. But this doesn’t mean integration will be easy. There are plenty of challenges ahead.

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The IT Career Path: A Dead End Or An Avenue To The Exec Suite?

Sharyn Leaver

IT-related jobs are set to grow through to 2016.

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The Fear Of Four... And The Future Of Fraud Detection

Chris McClean

I had a few great conversations yesterday about the increasing role analytics will play in risk and compliance programs, which brought to mind the article, For Some Firms, a Case of 'Quadrophobia' appearing earlier this week in the Wall Street Journal and referenced yesterday by the NY Times’ Freakonomics blog.

The article covers a study of quarterly earnings reports over a nearly 30 year period, which found a statistically low number of results ending in four-tenths of a cent. The implication here is that companies fudge their numbers slightly to report earnings ending in five-tenths, which can then be rounded up... clever. Even more interesting, authors of the study found that these “quadrophobes” are “more likely to restate financials and to be named as defendants in SEC Accounting and Auditing Enforcement Releases (AAER)”... not clever.

The report encourages the SEC to enhance its oversight with a new department dedicated solely to detailed quantitative analysis that might catch this type of behavior. It also occurs to me that many corporations would like to identify such trends within their four walls to detect and prevent potentially damaging behavior.

Clearly, the cultural/human aspects of risk management and compliance – policies, attestations, training, awareness, whistleblowing, etc. – are essential. But as the number and complexity of business transactions continue to grow, companies will be looking more and more for ways to analyze massive amounts of data for damaging patterns and trends.

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Metrics, Metrics, Metrics – What Do Benchmarks Tell Us Anyway?

Margo Visitacion

A common inquiry request to Forrester is asking for benchmarks for quality.  Testing groups are struggling to figure out how well they’re doing and if the processes they’re fighting for are making a difference.

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11 Meanings of Why-My-BI-Application-Is-Not-Useful

Boris Evelson

When a user of a BI application complains about the application not being useful - something that I hear way too often - what does that really mean? I can count at least 11 possible meanings, and potential reasons:

1. The data is not there, because

  • It's not in any operational sources, in which case the organization needs to implement a new app, a new process or get that data from an outside source
  • It is in an operational source, but not accessible via the BI application.

The data is there, but

2. It's not usable as is, because

  • There are no common definitions, common metadata
  • The data is of poor quality
  • The data model is wrong, or out of date

3. I can't find it, because I

  • Can't find the right report
  • Can't find the right metadata
  • Can't find the data
  • I don't have access rights to the data I am looking for

4. I don't know how to use my application, because I

  • Was not trained
  • Was trained, but the application is not intuitive, user friendly enough

5. I can't/don't have time do it myself - because I just need to run my business, not do BI !!! - and

  • I don't have support staff
  • I am low on IT priority list

6. It takes too long to

  • Create a report/query
  • Run/execute a report/query
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How Do We Define a "BI Vendor"

Boris Evelson

My colleague, Holger Kisker, just posted a very insightful blog on the convergence of BI and BPM technologies. Yes, Holger, BPM vendors definitely have some BI capabilities. And so do some search vendors like Attivio, Endeca and Microsoft FAST Search. And so do some middleware vendors like TIBCO, Vitria and Software AG. And so do rules vendors like FairIsaac, PegaSystems. Should I go on? I have a list of hundreds of vendors that "say" they are a BI vendor.

But it’s not that simple. First of all, let’s define BI. In the last BI Wave we defined BI as “a set of methodologies, processes, architectures, and technologies that transform raw data into meaningful and useful information used to enable more effective strategic, tactical, and operational insights and decision-making”. To provide all these capabilities a vendor should have most of the necessary components such as data integration, data quality, master data management, metadata management, data warehousing, OLAP, reporting, querying, dashboarding, portal, and many, many others. In this broader sense only full BI stack vendors such as IBM, Oracle, SAP, Microsoft, SAS, TIBCO and Information Builders qualify.

Even if we define BI more narrowly as the reporting and analytics layer of the broader BI stack, we still want to include capabilities such as 11 ones we use to rate BI vendors in the BI Waves:

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