Brand Loyalty Is Declining. Total Product Experience Chains Can Help.

JP Gownder

Product strategists in many industries (from CPG to consumer electronics to financial services) share a challenge with their marketing colleagues: how to leverage the power of brand. Product strategists have a number of strategic tools in their toolboxes for differentiating their products from competitors’ offerings: features (a different taste, a new technical capability, or a higher interest rate, for instance); channel, price, or brand (or based on some combination of these factors). For the moment, let’s think about brand, because some product strategists design and build their products based largely on the promise implied by their brand name.

Forrester’s new research report – leveraging a multi-year analysis of Consumer Technographics® data – shows that while brand is important, brand loyalty (defined as the propensity to repurchase a brand) has been waning. The new report, entitled “Brand Loyalty Isn’t Enough For Products Anymore,” reveals that:

·         Brand loyalty is on the decline. Brand loyalty dropped in the U.S. from 2006 to 2010, our data shows. One reason? The Great Recession. Another? The strength of brands themselves: competing brands in the marketplace entice consumers to try new brands.

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Oracle Open World Part 1 – The Circus Comes To Town And The Acts Are Great!

Richard Fichera

In the good old days, computer industry trade shows were bigger than life events – booths with barkers and actors, ice cream and espresso bars and games in the booth, magic acts and surging crowds gawking at technology. In recent years, they have for the most part become sad shadows of their former selves. The great SHOWS are gone, replaced with button-down vertical and regional events where you are lucky to get a pen or a miniature candy bar for your troubles.

Enter Oracle OpenWorld. Mix 45,000 people, hundreds of exhibitors, one of the world’s largest software and systems company looking to make an impression, and you have the new generation of technology extravaganza. The scale is extravagant, taking up the entire Moscone Center complex (N, S and W) along with a couple of hotel venues, closing off a block of a major San Francisco street for a week, and throwing a little evening party for 20 or 30 thousand people.

But mixed with the hoopla, which included wheel of fortune giveaways that had hundreds of people snaking around the already crowded exhibition floor in serpentine lines, mini golf and whack-a-mole-games in the exhibit booths along with the aforementioned espresso and ice cream stands, there was genuine content and the public face of some significant trends. So far, after 24 hours, some major messages come through loud and clear:

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Can You Use Microsoft IE 8 Via VMware ThinApp? It Depends On Who You Ask.

Duncan Jones

As soon as you think you understand software companies’ policies on virtualization, a new problem appears that makes you tear your hair out and scratch your now-bald head. This month’s conundrum is whether or not VMware’s ThinApp product breaches your Microsoft Windows license agreement:

  • VMware promotes this product with the headline “Extend the Life of Legacy Applications, Including IE 6 Applications, with Windows 7 Support.” http://www.vmware.com/products/thinapp/overview.html
  • However, Microsoft, via its knowledge base, claims that “Running multiple versions of Windows Internet Explorer, or portions of Windows Internet Explorer, on a single instance of Windows is an unlicensed and unsupported solution.” http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2020599/en-us#top
  • VMware doesn’t warn customers that ThinApp could cause them Microsoft licensing problems, but neither does it claim that it is legal. It merely advises customers to check with Microsoft.
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A SharePoint Custom-Development Strategy Is More Crucial Now Than Ever

John R. Rymer

I prepared this research with Rob Koplowitz.

The stage is set for a big upswing in custom application development on Microsoft SharePoint. First, SharePoint Server 2010 adoption is very strong, and this version of the product has the strongest features yet for custom development. Second, with application backlogs growing, many organizations will find themselves taking on SharePoint "customization" projects to meet business demands. Custom application development is the riskiest of the six SharePoint "workloads." For organizations adopting SharePoint, this situation demands a careful strategy now to avoid problems later. This post delivers our latest assessment of SharePoint adoption and discusses its implications for app delivery professionals.

Our latest survey on customer experiences with Microsoft SharePoint shows a successful product moving crisply through a major upgrade, from Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS 2007) to SharePoint Server 2010. SharePoint usage is strong in organizations of all sizes and in most industry sectors. The product's continued success has two conflicting facets for application development and delivery pros:

  • SharePoint can be a productive platform for business applications. SharePoint can help your teams deliver applications fast in three ways. First, with a little customization of the human interface, SharePoint's out-of-the-box applications can work for many situations. Second, SharePoint's basket of developer services for applications involving collaboration, social media, website creation, workflows, document management, information distribution, search, and reporting dashboards can speed completion of projects. Third, you can delegate simple sites and workflows, as well as content updating, to businesspeople.
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What’s Holding CISOs Back?

Stephanie Balaouras

According to our survey data dating back to 2008, despite year after year of high profile security breaches from Heartland Payment Systems to Wikileaks to Sony, security budgets have only increased by single digits. This is hardly enough to keep up with the increasing sophistication of attacks, the avalanche of breach notification laws and the changing business and IT environment.

The changing business and IT environment is perhaps the greatest concern. With a massive explosion of mobile devices and other endpoint form factors and an ever expanding ecosystem of customers, partners, clouds, service providers and supply chains, you increasingly have less and less direct control over your data, your applications and end-user identities. We refer to this expanding ecosystem as the “extended enterprise.” An extended enterprise is one for which, a business function is rarely, if ever, a self-contained workflow within the infrastructure boundaries of the company. We believe that the extended enterprise is such a major shift for CISOs and security professionals that we dedicated our upcoming Security Forum to it as well as a significant stream of research.

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ITSM: People are the Problem, but People are the Solution

Glenn O'Donnell

I just spent most of this week at the annual itSMF conference called Fusion, held this year at the sprawling Gaylord National Resort below Washington DC. As always, it was a wonderful gathering of some of the finest people I know. When you’ve been involved in the IT service management field as long as I have, you get to know a LOT of these people very well. In fact, when I delivered the closing keynote of Fusion in 2009, I opened by saying, “This feels like a family reunion … except I like you more!” I was only half joking because many of these people ARE like family and I do indeed like them.

 As Forrester’s “automation guy” I often make statements about the flaws of the people in IT. I always try to inject some comedy into these statements because we have to be able to laugh at ourselves. There is a serious side to this position, however. There are now just under 7 billion idiots on this planet and none of us is exempt from that characterization. People do dumb things. We all do. Hopefully, we do more start things than dumb things. Since we do dumb things, we need to protect ourselves from ourselves.

ITSM is one of many mechanisms that offers such protection. We need ITSM because IT has rightfully earned an awful reputation for chaotic execution. It seems that IT is one of the most egregious demographic groups exemplifying human error and sloppiness. It is full of smart people doing dumb things. We in IT have a very serious problem.

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Big Data Will Help Shape Your Market’s Next Big Winners

Brian  Hopkins

It seems that every week another vendor slaps “big data” into its marketing material – and it’s going to get worse. Should you look beyond the vendor hype and pay attention? Absolutely yes! Why? Because big data has the potential to shape your market’s next winners and losers.

At Forrester, we think clients must develop an intuitive understanding of big data by learning: 1) what is new about it; 2) what it is; and 3) how it will influence their market.

What is new about big data? We estimate that firms effectively utilize less than 5% of available data. Why so little? The rest is simply too expensive to deal with. Big data is new because it lets firms affordably dip into that other 95%. If two companies use data with the same effectiveness but one can handle 15% of available data and one is stuck at 5%, who do you think will win? The deal, however, is that big data is not like your traditional BI tools; it will require new processes and may totally redefine your approach to data governance.

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DCIM And The New Reality Of Infrastructure & Operations

Richard Fichera

I recently published an update on power and cooling in the data center (http://www.forrester.com/go?docid=60817), and as I review it online, I am struck by the combination of old and new. The old – the evolution of semiconductor technology, the increasingly elegant attempts to design systems and components that can be incrementally throttled, and the increasingly sophisticated construction of the actual data centers themselves, with increasing modularity and physical efficiency of power and cooling.

The new is the incredible momentum I see behind Data Center Infrastructure Management software. In a few short years, DCIM solutions have gone from simple aggregated viewing dashboards to complex software that understands tens of thousands of components, collects, filters and analyzes data from thousands of sensors in a data center (a single CRAC may have in excess of 20 sensors, a server over a dozen, etc.) and understands the relationships between components well enough to proactively raise alarms, model potential workload placement and make recommendations about prospective changes.

Of all the technologies reviewed in the document, DCIM offers one of the highest potentials for improving overall efficiency without sacrificing reliability or scalability of the enterprise data center. While the various DCIM suppliers are still experimenting with business models, I think that it is almost essential for any data center operations group that expects significant change, be it growth, shrinkage, migration or a major consolidation or cloud project, to invest in DCIM software. DCIM consumers can expect to see major competitive action among the current suppliers, and there is a strong potential for additional consolidation.

Is IT Infrastructure & Operations Still Relevant In “The Age Of The Customer”?

Doug Washburn

Yes, but you must adapt by demonstrating your ability to drive business growth and differentiation, not just cost savings and uptime. Here’s a personal example of a much broader trend as to why this is so important to your business and your role as an I&O professional:

It’s a cool Autumn day, which reminds me I need a new jacket. I walk into Patagonia. I evaluate several models and then buy one – but not from Patagonia. It turns out a competitor located two miles away is offering the jacket at a discount. How did I know this? I scanned the product's bar code using the RedLaser app on my iPhone, which displayed several local retailers with lower prices. If I had been willing to wait three days for shipping, I could have purchased that same jacket while standing in Patagonia from an online retailer with an even better deal. [Truth be told: I actually bought the jacket from Patagonia's store after validating no better deals existed… but The Home Depot wasn’t so lucky this summer when I bought the same, but cheaper air conditioner from Amazon while standing in aisle 4.] 

This is a prime example of what Forrester calls the “The Age Of The Customer” where empowered buyers have information at their fingertips to check a price, read a product review, or ask for advice from a friend right from the screen of their smartphone. This type of technology-led disruption is eroding traditional competitive barriers across all industries; manufacturing strength, distribution power, and information mastery can't save you.

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Don't Think BPM And Customer Experience Are Your Problem? Think Again

Kyle McNabb

Development leaders! Project leaders and business analysts! Application and solution architects! Want to move forward on your business technology (BT) journey and be viewed by your business stakeholders as a valuable team member? Take a tip from last week's Forums held in Boston. Embrace Business Process Management (BPM) And Customer Experience. Don't ignore them, embrace them. Why? They're essential to helping you achieve your business outcomes.

I know, I know. You read the above and now think "Gee Kyle, what's next? Going to enlighten me on some new BPM or customer experience management technology that's going to transform my very existence, my company's future?"

Nope. Let me explain....

Last week we hosted more than 250 of your application development and delivery and business process peers in Boston and focused on how to succeed in the new world of customer engagement. The most impactful discussions I heard were the side conversations we held with attendees, sometimes occurring over dinner and cocktails. We didn't discuss technology. We discussed the skills your peers were developing in two fundamental areas:

  1. BPM - no, not the technology but the Lean and Six Sigma based methods, techniques, and tools organizations use to focus on business processes and not functions; to strive for continuous improvement; and to focus on customer value. 
  2. Customer experience - defined more eloquently by my peer Harley Manning, but I'll summarize as the methods, techniques, and tools used to understand how customers perceive their interactions with your company.
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