Announcing The Annual Forrester Groundswell Awards For Employee Collaboration, Innovation, And Mobile

Ted Schadler

This post is to announce and describe the 2011 Groundswell Awards, specifically the internal "management" category: innovation, collaboration (including social), and mobile. As my Empowered coauthor, Josh Bernoff, writes:

"We had this idea in 2007 that we could surface the best, most interesting, most effective social applications with an awards program. At the time, I never realized just what a fascinating variety of programs we'd encounter. So we kept doing it."

"The purpose of this post is two-fold -- to officially announce and open up the site for entries to the 2011 awards, and to celebrate some of the most amazing entries of the last five years."

Read Josh's recap of the award's five-year history here.

Starting last year, we expanded the field to include three internal “management” scenarios in line with our book Empowered. The awards this year are for:

  • Employee Mobile Application:Help employees solve customer and business problems using smartphones and tablets.
  • Employee Collaboration/Social Application:Help employees connect and work together.
  • Innovation System:Surface and develop new ideas.

Read more

The Mainstreaming of UCS - Cisco Announces Microsoft SQL Server Alliance

Richard Fichera

Entering into a new competitive segment, especially one dominated by major players with well-staked out turf, requires a level of hyperbole, dramatic positioning and a differentiable product. Cisco has certainly achieved all this and more in the first two years of shipment of its UCS product, and shows no signs of fatigue to date.

However, Cisco’s announcement this week that it is now part of Microsoft’s Fast Track Data Warehouse and Fast Track OLTP program is a sign that UCS is also entering the mainstream of enterprise technology. The Microsoft Fast Track program, offering a set of reference architectures, system specification and sizing guides for both common usage scenarios for Microsoft SQL Server, is not new, nor is it in any way unique to Cisco. Fast Track includes Dell, HP, IBM, and Bull. The fact that Cisco will now get equal billing from Microsoft in this program is significant – it is the beginning of the transition from emerging fringe to mainstream , and an endorsement to anyone in the infrastructure business that Cisco is now appearing on the same stage as the major incumbents.

Will this represent a breakthrough revenue opportunity for Cisco? Probably not, since Microsoft will be careful not to play favorites and will certainly not risk alienating its major systems partners, but Cisco’s inclusion on this list is another incremental step in becoming a mainstream server supplier. Like the chicken soup that my grandmother used to offer, it can’t hurt.

Big Data Survey

Boris Evelson

Forrester is in the middle of a major research effort on various Big Data-related topics. As part of this research, we’ll be kicking off a client survey shortly. I’d like to solicit everyone’s input on the survey questions and answer options. Here’s the first draft. What am I missing?

  1. Scope. What is the scope of your Big Data initiative?
    1. Enterprise
    2. LOB
    3. Departmental
    4. Regional
    5. Project-based
  2. Status. What is the status of your Big Data initiative?
    1. In production
    2. Piloting
    3. Testing
    4. Evaluating
  3. Industry. Are the questions you are trying to address with your Big Data initiative general or industry-specific?
    1. General
    2. Industry-specific
    3. Both
  4. Domains. What enterprise areas does your Big Data initiative address?
    1. Sales
    2. Marketing
    3. Customer service
    4. Finance
    5. HR
    6. Product development
    7. Operations
    8. Logistics
    9. Brand management
    10. IT analytics
    11. Risk management
  5. Why BigData? What are the main business requirements or inadequacies of earlier-generation BI/DW/ET technologies, applications, and architecture that are causing you to consider or implement Big Data?
    1. Data volume
      1. <10Tb
      2. 10-100Tb
      3. 100Tb-1Pb
      4. >1Pb
    2. Velocity of change and scope/requirements unpredictability
    3. Data diversity
    4. Analysis-driven requirements (Big Data) vs. requirements-driven analysis (traditional BI/DW)
    5. Cost. Big Data solutions are less expensive than traditional ETL/DW/BI solutions
Read more

Isn't It Time CEOs Were Held Accountable For Technology?

Nigel Fenwick

I realize I'm posting two rants in a row here (my last one was on marketing being a dirty word), but this is important! I just read in the WSJ that it's time more CIOs report to the top... my initial reaction was "oh come on, really, are we still on with this old chestnut?" -- the thing is, I couldn't agree more. But here's what gets me -- we were saying this in the '80s. The hope back then was that, as more CEOs stepped up who had grown up with technology, things would change and more CIOs would report into the CEO. Clearly this was pie-in-the-sky optimism ... so what went wrong?

Traditional wisdom (aka analysts) suggests that it's up to the CIO to "earn" a seat at the table by demonstrating leadership, delivering business value from IT, and lots of other hoops to jump through. While my colleagues and I work diligently on research to help CIOs achieve this, I can't help feeling there is an alternative perspective we are missing, and that's what drove me to write this blog post.

Read more

ERP Grows Into The Cloud: Reflections From SuiteWorld 2011

Holger Kisker

Cloud computing continues to be hyped. By now, almost every ICT hardware, software, and services company has some form of cloud strategy — even if it’s just a cloud label on a traditional hosting offering — to ride this wave. This misleading vendor “cloud washing” and the complex diversity of the cloud market in general make cloud one of the most popular and yet most misunderstood topics today (for a comprehensive taxonomy of the cloud computing market, see this Forrester blog post).

Software-as-a-service (SaaS) is the largest and most strongly growing cloud computing market; its total market size in 2011 is $21.2 billion, and this will explode to $78.4 billion by the end of 2015, according to our recently published sizing of the cloud market. But SaaS consists of many different submarkets: Historically, customer relationship management (CRM), human capital management (HCM) — in the form of “lightweight” modules like talent management rather than payroll — eProcurement, and collaboration software have the highest SaaS adoption rates, but highly integrated software applications that process the most sensitive business data, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP), are the lantern-bearers of SaaS adoption today.

Read more

The Key To Being A Smart City Is Good Governance: “Smart Governance”

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

What’s it take to be a smart city? Is it smart transportation, such as sensors in parking spaces that call out to drivers like sirens calling to Ulysses as he headed back to Ithaca? Or parking meters sending SMS messages to alert those parked that their time is up, like a baby bird calling to be fed? Is it smart buildings that turn the lights on when you enter or off when you leave? Is it smart waste management? Is it smart energy grids? Is it smart water systems? Or smart administration? All of these help make city services and operations more efficient. But the real key to being smart is to have an overall management system that allows leaders to coordinate across these smart systems, capturing and sharing the data generated and using it to inform new policies and city programs. Smart cities require good – “smart” – governance and the processes and tools that enable it.

Increasingly, city leaders are adopting enterprise management practices – and technologies – in order to improve city governance. Smart city leaders:

  • Match budgeted spending with performance objectives.
  • Adopt enterprise apps such as EAM, ERP, and CRM in shared or cloud models.
  • Appoint professional operational and IT management to coordinate.
  • Implement regular process and performance reviews – and supporting technologies.
  • Establish integrated reporting for greater transparency.
Read more

When Did Marketing Become A Dirty Word?

Nigel Fenwick

I'm going to date myself here, but in the early 90's when I was working in IT, I created a new role: "IT Marketing and Services." In defining the role, I was quite deliberate about my choice of words -- especially in the use of "marketing." This role was responsible for all customer-facing aspects of IT -- that included IT business relationship managers (yes we had them back in the early 90's), help desk, training, communications (of the PR kind), demand management and planning. I chose the word "marketing" deliberately to reflect the fact that this was a customer-facing responsibility (both internal IT customers and end-customers of the business from a technology perspective).

Twenty years on, and the number of IT professionals who really understand marketing and recognize the importance of marketing as a key component of IT operating strategy has, if anything, declined. Why?

Often when I ask CIOs today about the role of marketing in IT they are overcome with concern about using the term "marketing" in the context of IT. They believe people across the organization will think there is no role for marketing in IT, and that having anyone with a "marketing" title will suggest IT has too much money. Why does this fundamental misunderstanding of marketing perpetuate throughout organizations? So many otherwise knowledgeable executives think marketing is simply advertising or worse "spin." Do "marketing" job titles in IT really suggest that CIOs are trying to "sell" IT to the rest of the business? I wonder if this is a problem for IT or if it is an issue created by the perception of others outside of IT.

Read more

Blogging From the IBM Big Data Symposium - Big Is More Than Just Big

Brian  Hopkins

Just attended a Big Data symposium courtesy of IBM and thought I’d share a few insights, as probably many of you have heard the term but are not sure what it means to you.

No. 1: Big Data is about looking out of the front window when you drive, not the rearview mirror. What do I mean? The typical decision-making process goes something like this: capture some data, integrate it together, analyze the clean and integrated data, make some decisions, execute. By the time you decide and execute, the data may be too old and have cost you too much. It’s a bit like driving by looking out of your rearview mirror.

Big Data changes this paradigm by allowing you to iteratively sift through data at extreme scale in the wild and draw insights closer to real time. This is a very good thing, and companies that do it well will beat those that don’t.

No. 2: Big is not just big volume. The term “Big Data” is a misnomer and it is causing some confusion. Several of us here at Forrester have been saying for a while that it is about the four “V’s" of data at extreme scale - volume, velocity, variety and variability. I was relieved when IBM came up with three of them; variability being the one they left out.

Some of the most interesting examples we discussed centered on the last 3 V’s – we heard from a researcher who is collecting data on vital signs from prenatal babies and correlating changes in heart rates with early signs of infection. According to her, they collect 90 million data points per patient per day! What do you do with that stream of information? How do you use it to save lives? It is a Big Data Problem.

Read more

NetSuite Announces Aggressive Plans To Move Into The Enterprise

Kate Leggett

NetSuite was kind enough to invite me to the analyst day at its SuiteWorld 2011 user conference — an event packed with product, strategy, customer, and partner information. The focus was clearly on its platform and ERP solutions. Here are my thoughts and takeaways:

  • NetSuite wants to ride the SaaS wave into the enterprise. NetSuite is the only SaaS-based ERP suite of scale. It reports that its data centers get 2.2 million unique logins and 4 billion customer requests a month. However, NetSuite wants to do better. It wants to take its well-tested and well-adopted solution in the midmarket and extend into the enterprise. The timing is right, as Forrester reports that enterprises are ready to consider SaaS-based ERP solutions. In fact, NetSuite reports that sales to enterprise customers increased 37% between 2009 and 2010.
  • NetSuite has a solution package targeted at the enterprise. NetSuite announced a new “Unlimited” package for about $1 million, which includes all modules, unlimited storage, applications, SuiteCloud customizations, subsidiaries, and unlimited users. The exact pricing is based on functionality and number of users (which starts at 500), and scales up from there. It is a package targeted to compete with traditional on-premise ERP vendors as well as SAP’s on-demand solution, Business ByDesign.
Read more

Categories:

Ballmer's Masterstroke In Buying Skype

Mike Gualtieri

Steve Ballmer Does Not Like To Lose

With Microsoft's plan to acquire Skype for $8.5 billion, Steve Ballmer is doing a Jason Voorhees in Crystal Lake. Let me explain. Microsoft failed miserably at mobile. While the boys and girls in Redmond were contemplating how to put the "Start" menu on a phone, Steve Jobs was cleaning mobile clocks with the iPhone. But, like all great competitors, Microsoft knew they lost it. So they started from scratch. The result: Windows Phone 7. In my opinion, an awesome mobile platform on a par with iPhone, albeit with a lot less cultural cachet. The problem: The momentum favors iPhone and Android. Microsoft needs an ace card. Ballmer, potentially, found an ace card in Skype.

With 633 Million Users, Skype Is A Communication Juggernaut

Skype is not a phone. It's a way to see your three-year-old granddaughter, connect with your adult children, or make sure your family is safe 4,000 miles away. And, it's mostly free. Of the 633 million users, fewer than 8 million are paying users. No matter. What is important is that many of these users would love to make free calls on a mobile phone.

Read more