Quest Acquires e-DMZ: Get Ready For Consolidation In The PIM Space

Andras Cser

Quest is making aggressive moves to extend into the heterogeneous, non-Microsoft-centric land of identity and access management. After acquiring Voelcker Informatik for provisioning, Quest just announced the acquisition of e-DMZ, an enterprise-class, high-performance PIM appliance vendor. Novell (now Attachmate) acquired host access control specialist Fortefi, Oracle bought Passlogix (vGO-SAM), CA extended Access Control, and IBM integrated Encentuate's eSSO solution with ITIM as a service offering to manage privileged access. The remaining major PIM players like Cyber-Ark, Lieberman, and BeyondTrust will now face added client RFP scrutiny and price pressures from the competition. Forrester expects that new IAM entrants like Symantec/VeriSign,  NetIQ (to compete with arch-rival Quest), or MSSPs will look at acquiring the remaining above vendors.

AMD Bumps Its Specs, Waits For Interlagos And Bulldozer

Richard Fichera

Since its introduction of its Core 2 architecture, Intel reversed much of the damage done to it by AMD in the server space, with attendant publicity. AMD, however, has been quietly reclaiming some ground with its 12-core 6100 series CPUs, showing strength in  benchmarks that emphasize high throughput in process-rich environments as opposed to maximum performance per core. Several AMD-based system products have also been cited by their manufacturers to us as enjoying very strong customer acceptance due to the throughput of the 12-core CPUs combined with their attractive pricing. As a fillip to this success, AMD this past week announced speed bumps for the 6100-series products to give a slight performance boost as they continue to compete with Intel’s Xeon 5600 and 7500 products (Intel’s Sandy Bridge server products have not yet been announced).

But the real news last week was the quiet subtext that the anticipated 16-core Interlagos products based on the new Bulldozer core appear to be on schedule for Q2 ’11 shipments system partners, who should probably be able to ship systems during Q3, and that AMD is still certifying them as compatible with the current sockets used for the 12-core 6000 CPUs. This implies that system partners will be able to quickly deliver products based on the new parts very rapidly.

Actual performance of these systems will obviously be dependent on the workloads being run, but our gut feeling is that while they will not rival the per-core performance of the Intel Xeon 7500 CPUs, for large throughput-oriented environments with high numbers of processes, a description that fits a large number of web and middleware environments, these CPUs, each with up to a 50% performance advantage per core over the current AMD CPUs, may deliver some impressive benchmarks and keep the competition in the server  space at a boil, which in the end is always helpful to customers.

Is Infrastructure & Operations Vulnerable To Job Market Trends?

Jean-Pierre Garbani

A couple of weeks ago, I read that one of the largest US car makers was trying to buy out several thousand machinists and welders. While we have grown accustomed to bad news in this economy, what I found significant was that these were skilled workers. Personally, I find it a lot easier to write code than to weld two pieces of steel together, and I have tried both.

For the past 20 years, the job market in industrialized countries has shown a demand increase at the high and low ends of the wage and skill scale, to the detriment of the middle. Although it’s something that we may have intuitively perceived in our day-to-day lives, a 2010 paper by David Autor of MIT confirms the trend:

“. . . the structure of job opportunities in the United States has sharply polarized over the past two decades, with expanding job opportunities in both high-skill, high-wage occupations and low-skill, low-wage occupations, coupled with contracting opportunities in middle-wage, middle-skill white-collar and blue-collar jobs.”

One of the reasons for this bipolarization of the job market is that most of the tasks in the middle market are based on well-known and well-documented procedures that can be easily automated by software (or simply offshored). This leaves, at the high end, jobs that require analytical and decision-making skills usually based on a solid education, and at the low end, “situational adaptability, visual and language recognition, and in-person interactions. . . . and little in the way of formal education.”

Can this happen to IT? As we are fast-forwarding to an industrial IT, we tend to replicate what other industries did before us, that is remove the person in the middle through automation and thus polarize the skill and wage opportunities at both ends of the scale.

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The Nastiest Performance Bottleneck Is Often The Database

Mike Gualtieri

Some of the most joyful technical challenges I experienced as a developer were solving application performance problems. Isn't it fun. You are Sherlock Holmes - examining the architecture, diving into the code for clues, and scouring through logs files to find the bottlenecks that are responsible for snail's pace. However, this job is a lot harder than Sherlock Holmes or CSI. It is more like Dr. Gregory House, because you are racing against the clock. For every minute of sluggish performance, you could be losing eyeballs and therefore revenue. Worst case: the patient, i.e., your website, dies.

Performance Problems Are Usually Elevated Because Of A Crisis

Your business just launched a Super Bowl commercial that confidently directed people to your website - #fail. More likely, a new release of software performs like a dog (with apologies to Greyhounds) because of lame coding and nonexistent performance testing.

 You Need A Clever Solution, Fast

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The Seven Qualities Of Wildly Desirable Software

Mike Gualtieri

Cosmopolitan magazine certainly doesn't publish articles such as "Seven Hairstyles That Will Make Your Man Yawn." Wildly desirable is more like it. And so too, is it with great software. If you want your applications to be successful, you better make them wildly desirable.

My latest published research has identified seven key qualities that all applications must exhibit to be wildly desirable, with our choices based on research and inquiries on software design and architecture; assessment advisories with clients; and interviews with leading experts, including both practitioners and academics.

Forrester defines the seven qualities of software as:

The common requirements that all software applications must satisfy to be successful: user experience, availability, performance, scalability, adaptability, security, and economy.

Seven Qualities Of Wildly Desirable Apps

All seven qualities are important, but if you get the user experience (UX) wrong, nothing else matters.

The UX is the part of your application that your employees and/or customers see and use daily. You can do an exceptional job on project management, requirements gathering, data management, testing, and coding, but if the user experience is poor, your results still be mediocre — or even a complete failure.

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Looking At The Nokia Microsoft Deal From The Mobile Apps Perspective

John McCarthy

Today’s deal between Microsoft and Nokia acts as a temporary lifeline for both companies. It gives Microsoft access to the largest handset provider, and it allows Nokia to defray some of its operating system development costs. I have just finished a report, “Mobile App Internet Recasts The Software And Services Landscape,” that will hit the Forrester site on Monday, February 28.

In the report, Forrester states, “The explosion of app innovation that started on the iPhone and then spread to Android devices and tablets will continue to drive tech industry innovation and have far-reaching pricing and go-to-market implications for the industry. Three different vectors of innovation that have been percolating under the surface will combine over the next 3-5 years. Mobile, cloud, and smart computing together will foster a new set of 'intelligence everywhere' apps.”

And based on that research, I believe that deal does not address the biggest issue for both companies – attracting apps and app developers. For Nokia, it now sends the message that Symbian and MeeGo platforms are no longer the long-term app focus. For Microsoft, it creates an eight-to-twelve month void/pause as developers wait to see what the new Nokia hardware looks like.

At the current rate that Apple and Android are recruiting third-party and enterprise app developers, this could mean a gap of 100,000-200,000 applications by the time the first Nokia Windows Phone device ships. This is likely a lead that even the combined resources of Microsoft and Nokia could not bridge.

Windows Phone 7 Is Invited To The Mobile Dance By Nokia

Ted Schadler

Make no mistake about Nokia's global power. They are still the dominant handset maker globally. But Nokia somehow missed the shift to the handheld computers we call smartphones and tablets.

Make no mistake about Microsoft's tenacity. They will drop a cool billion to enter a market. But they have tried and tried and tried again to build an operating system that can work on the handheld computes we call smartphones and tablets.

Well, Windows Phone 7 (now where did the "7" come from?) is a good mobile OS, at least on smartphones. No idea whether it will work on tablets. (We know Windows 7 itself won't.)

And Nokia's smartphone platforms like the E7 are a decent piece of hardware.

Now that these two megaliths are partnering up, Microsoft's mobile OS has a chance for relevance. I and my colleagues have predicted and urged you, our enterprise customers, to focus on three mobile platforms: Apple's iOS, Google's Android, and RIM's QNX. Well, it's time to take a flier on Microsoft as well.

It's way too early to tell if this partnership will be successful or if anybody, particularly your US and European employees, will care about Nokia smartphones or tablets running Windows Phone 7. But if they nail the product experience. If they sign up the carriers. If they quickly roll out a good, competitively-priced tablet running the same Windows Phone OS. If they port Word and PowerPoint and OneNote and Excel and SharePoint Workspace to that tablet and phones. If they attract ISVs. If they attract independent developers. If they build a decent app store. If they sign up the mobile device management vendors. If they execute brilliantly. Then they could be relevant.

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How Autodesk Tackles The Next Frontier Of IT-For-Green

Chris Mines
How Autodesk Tackles the Next Frontier of IT-for-Green
My travels last month took me back to the Bay Area for client meetings and a chance to spend some time at the Autodesk Gallery, a very cool space near the ferry building in San Francisco. Autodesk uses it to show off its customers' design innovations, not coincidentally created using the company's design software. The event in January showcased how customers are using Autodesk visualization software to improve the sustainability of their product designs and implementations. This is tackling sustainability right at its core: making products that are more energy- and resource-efficient, easier to manufacture, easier to reuse and recycle, right from the start. The products we saw at the event included:
  • A new research facility at NASA Ames down the peninsula. This super-green building is aimed at "beyond" LEED Platinum standards, incorporating a variety of innovative design and engineering elements all captured in building information modeling (BIM) software. The Feds will use it as a laboratory for energy efficient buildings, spreading its best practices and learnings across the broad portfolio of US government buildings and research facilities. NASA is also working to make the design blueprint a working model for efficient ongoing operation of the building.
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BSM Rediscovered

Jean-Pierre Garbani

I have in the past lamented the evolution of BSM into more of an ITIL support solution than the pure IT management project that we embarked on seven years ago. In the early years of BSM, we all were convinced of the importance of application dependency discovery: It was the bridge between the user, who sees an application, and IT, which sees infrastructures. We were all convinced that discovery tools should be embedded in infrastructure management solutions to improve them. I remember conversations with all big four product managers, and we all agreed at the time that the “repository” of dependencies, later to become CMDB, was not a standalone solution. How little we knew!

 What actually happened was the discovery tools showed a lot of limitations and the imperfect CMDB that was the result became the center of ITIL v2 universe. The two essential components that we saw in BSM for improving the breed of system management tools were quietly forgotten. These two major failures are: 1) real-time dependency discovery — because last month’s application dependencies are as good as yesterday’s newspaper when it comes to root cause analysis or change detection, and 2) the reworking of tools around these dependencies — because it added a level of visibility and intelligence that was sorely lacking in the then current batch of monitoring and management solutions. But there is hope on the IT operations horizon.

These past few days, I have been briefed by two new companies that are actually going back to the roots of BSM.

Neebula has introduced a real-time discovery solution that continuously updates itself and is embedded into an intelligent event and impact analysis monitor. It also discovers applications in the cloud.

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Spring Training For Microsoft Negotiators

Duncan Jones

It’s a beautiful sunny day here in England, the first snowdrops have appeared in my garden and at least one of my pet hens has restarted laying – yes, Spring is on the way. Meanwhile, in the US the main harbinger of the changing season is the migration of baseball teams to Florida and Arizona for their annual pre-season ritual known as ‘Spring Training’. In the software sourcing world, the rites of Spring often include major negotiations with Oracle and Microsoft ahead of their fiscal year ends of May and June respectively. That’s why this is a perfect time of year to get some spring training of your own, at one of our ever-popular Microsoft Negotiation workshops.1 Anyone considering a major purchase or renewal with the Redmond Sluggers between now and the World Series should come along to Amsterdam on February 16 or Dallas on March 2 to hear why they may have extra leverage this year, and how to use it to get the best possible deal.

Microsoft had very high sales revenue for its December quarter, particularly the business division, but that didn’t come from the multi-year Enterprise Agreement (EA) and Software Assurance (SA) deals that the direct sales teams need. Microsoft’s revenue boost came from one-off purchases of its just-released Office 2010 product through its retail and small business programs. EA/ SA deals would initially appear in the accounts as unearned revenue in the balance sheet, and that was at the same level as two years earlier.2 So these results are consistent with our research that predicts that Microsoft’s direct sales teams will struggle to meet their tough EA bookings targets this year, and that will strengthen prospective buyers’ negotiating position.

We can’t promise warm weather or adoring fans, but our spring training session will help you with:

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