IBM Sheds Yet Another Hardware Business - Pays to Get Rid of Semiconductor Fabrication

Richard Fichera
While the timing of the event comes as a surprise, the fact that IBM has decided to unload its technically excellent but unprofitable semiconductor manufacturing operation does not, nor does its choice of Globalfoundries, with whom it has had a longstanding relationship.
 
Read more

Agile, flexible, modern BI deployments often require help from the professionals

Boris Evelson

Digitally empowered customers — both businesses and consumers — wield a huge influence on enterprise strategies, policies, and customer-facing and internal processes. With mobile devices, the Internet, and all-but-unlimited access to information about products, services, prices, and deals, customers are now well informed about companies and their products, and are able to quickly find alternatives and use peer pressure to drive change. But not all organizations have readily embraced this new paradigm shift, desperately clinging to rigid policies and inflexible business processes. A common thread running through the profile of most of the companies that are not succeeding in this new day and age is an inability to manage change successfully. Business agility — reacting to fast-changing business needs — is what enables businesses to thrive amid ever-accelerating market changes and dynamics.

Read more

Technology Imperatives To Manage The Ebola Outbreak

Skip Snow

The Ebola outbreak serves as a portrait of the fact that the health systems of the globe must be radically interconnected in order to ensure that global outbreaks like this have a chance of being contained. We are not in the 19th century where the massive migrations of populations took place using slow-moving transport and thus where the incubation periods of most diseases would have in all likelihood passed before a person approached a border.

Today I can be infected by a disease, and within hours be on a plane that crosses the world. Traditional public health precautions of quarantining the sick will not necessarily be effective. And so we must think though a better manner of managing what is fast becoming a continental pandemic and could easily become a global pandemic.

The picture above is from the emergency room entrance at Mt. Sinai Hospital on the corner of 100th street and Madison Ave. in Manhattan.

That the disease is out of control just now is documented by the current (October 15th) World Health Organization report on the roadmap to respond to the outbreak (http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/136508/1/roadmapsitrep15Oct2014.pdf?ua=1) which states:

“It is clear however that the situation in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone is deteriorating, with widespread and persistent transmission.”

Read more

Creating the Data Governance Killer App

Michele Goetz

One of the biggest stumbling blocks is getting business resources to govern data.  We've all heard it:

"I don't have time for this."

"Do you really need a full time person?"

"That really isn't my job."

"Isn't that an IT thing?"

"Can we just get a tool or hire a service company to fix the data?"

Let's face it, resources are the data governance killer even in the face of organizations trying to take on enterprise lead data governance efforts.

What we need to do is rethink the data governance bottlenecks and start with the guiding principle that data can only be governed when you have the right culture throughout the organization.  The point being, you need accountability with those that actually know something about the data, how it is used, and who feels the most pain.  That's not IT, that's not the data steward.  It's the customer care representative, the sales executive, the claims processor, the assessor, the CFO, and we can go on.  Not really the people you would normally include regularly in your data governance program.  Heck, they are busy!

But, the path to sustainable effective data governance is data citizenship - where everyone is a data steward.  So, we have to strike the right balance between automation, manual governance, and scale.  This is even more important as out data and system ecosystems are exploding in size, sophistication, and speed.  In the world of MDM and data quality vendors are looking specifically at how to get around these challenges.  There are five (5) areas of innovation:

Read more

Salesforce.com Enters The BI Market With Wave, The Salesforce Analytics Cloud

Boris Evelson

There just might be another 800-lb gorilla in the Business Intelligence market. In a year.

The popular cult book “Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy” by Douglas Adams defines space as “. . . big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. . .” There are no better words to describe the size and the opportunity of the business intelligence market. Not only is it “mind-bogglingly big,” but over the last few decades we’ve only scratched the surface. Recent Forrester research shows that only 12% of global enterprise business and technology decision-makers are sure of their ability to transform and use information for better insights and decision making, and over half still have BI and analytics content sitting in siloed desktop-based shadow IT applications that are mostly based on spreadsheets.

The opportunity has provided fertile feeding ground to more than fifty vendors, including: full-stack software vendors like IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP, each with $1 billion-plus BI portfolios; SAS Institute, a multibillion BI and analytics specialist; popular BI vendors Actuate, Information Builders, MicroStrategy, Qlik, Tableau Software, and Tibco Software, each with hundreds of millions in BI revenues; as well as dozens of vendors ranging from early to late stage startups.

Read more

"Business Technology" Spending In The US Will Grow Faster Three To Four Times Faster Than Classic "Information Technology"

Andrew Bartels

In our research over the past two years or so, Forrester has drawn a distinction between "business technology" and "information technology".  Information technology or IT represents the spending on technology goods and services that businesses and governments have been making over the past six decades to run their operations more efficiently and lower business costs.  Business technology or BT in contrast is the technology spending to grow revenues by winning, serving, and retaining customers.  In earlier reports, we identified the leading technologies that are part of what Forrester has called the BT Agenda (see "Top Technologies For Your BT Agenda").  Today, we have published our report that sizes US spending on BT (see "Sizing The US CIO's Business Technology Agenda -- Business Technologies Will Grow Faster Than Information Technologies And Will Exceed Half of New Project Spending").

Here are our key findings from this exercise:

  • BT technologies are more than just the front-office systems for sales and marketing.  They also include software and services for developing new products, handling and fulfilling orders, serving customers, and acquiring the human and partner resources for doing this effectively.  
  • IT technologies will continue to be over 70% of total tech spending through 2017.  Spending on information technology over decades has created a legacy of tech maintenance and operations spending, and firms still need to keep these core systems running. 
Read more

Oracle Open World 2014: Focus on Cloud CRM

Kate Leggett

This is my fifth time attending Oracle OpenWorld in as many years. The show, held on September 28-October 2 in San Francisco, drew a large crowd this year, topping 60,000 attendees from over 145 countries. I spent my time at the CX Central conference-within-a-conference, dedicated to Oracle's Sales, Service and Marketing cloud. I went to high-level vision sessions, road map sessions, and customer testimonials. I also spent a lot of time talking to systems integrators that have recently deployed these solutions. My impressions of this year are mixed. Here is why:

  • Oracle has deeply solidified its customer experience messaging. The vendor explains the importance on being focused on customer experiences that are in-line with customer expectations through the entire customer engagement journey, from researching to buying to using, and how few companies are doing a good job at delivering on expectations — a point that Forrester backs with a tremendous amount of research and data. Each session I attended led with a quick recap on the importance and value of delivering good CX, and this consistency was much appreciated.
  • There was an over-emphasis on technology as opposed to the business value that Oracle’s CRM solutions deliver. The banners and posters were about infrastructure, platform, cloud. Customer case studies were about “30% less customization; “20% greater efficiency; 40% faster.” What I found missing was the business value for the customer, articulated in better experiences that impacted top-line revenue.
Read more

Symantec No Longer Wants To Be The Company Where Good Software Goes To Live A Life Of Quiet Desperation

Stephanie Balaouras

Yesterday, Symantec announced that it too was ordering up a bowl of the organizational strategy du jour and splitting itself into two independent, publicly traded companies, one focusing on security and the other on information management.

I have doubts whether simply splitting in two can spark innovation after nine years of gobbling up gargantuan (I still miss you, Veritas) and small vendors alike with little to show for it but operational indigestion. But I suppose anything is better than changing CEOs as frequently as I change the oil in my car and standing by and watching CISOs turn to completely new security brands as their trusted advisor. And there is this little matter of how mobile, social, cloud, and big data are completely transforming not only the way digital businesses compete and serve their customers but how technology vendors themselves deliver their own solutions and engage with their clients -- and Symantec isn't leading the charge in any of those market shifts.

Read more

Security & Risk Analyst Spotlight Podcast With Heidi Shey

Stephanie Balaouras

October has arrived and it's time for what is becoming a fan-favorite series here at Forrester: the Security & Risk Analyst Spotlight Podcast featured in our bimonthly newsletter.  This month, we're featuring 8-year Forrester veteran and analyst Heidi Shey, one of our leading analysts on data security and privacy. You'll hear some great insights from Heidi on clients' top challenges, surprising research findings, and upcoming research and vendors to watch. To download the MP3 version of the podcast, please click Read more

Weebly Gives Digital Professionals The Freedom Of An iPad

Ted Schadler
I recently gave a speech about the impact of mobile on (all) commerce at a national retailer. To 450 terribly enthusiastic and mostly millennial employees celebrating a great eCommerce month. When I looked out at this horde of digital professionals -- merchandisers and marketers, designers and developers, writers and editors, testers and analyzers, the list goes on -- I realized that they are the operators of our digital experiences.
 
They are passionate about great digital experiences. But they have mostly crappy browser tools to do their job. In fact, every one of our planet's one billion websites is managed by someone using mostly crappy tools.
 
When I looked at at the throng of digital professionals, I suddenly realized they deserved some digital experience love, too. They deserved better digital tools. On any device. After all, they live out their working weeks in front of screens so that we, their customers, get great digital experiences. But today, the state of the art in browser design tools looks like scaffolding on a building where the result is unveiled at the end. It's anything but fun.
 
Weebly, supplier and hoster of 25 million content and commerce websites serving 200 million unique visitors monthly, decided to unshackle its digital professional customers from the tyrany of the browser and desktop. It built a native iPad app on iOS 8 to help them build and manage websites from anywhere at anytime. Weebly's digital professionals are now mobile. And that will lead them to be more in touch with the mobile moments of their customers, hence more able to serve them in their moments of need.
 
Read more