Closing The Experience Gaps Requires New Technology Architecture And Philosophy

John McCarthy

Forrester’s Customer Experience Index (CXi) research reveals a shocking business result: Over five years, CXi leaders outperformed the S&P with 43% stock growth, while CXi laggards had negative returns of -34%. (See this Forrester report to learn about our new customer experience index.)

As a result, firms are in an arms race to mobilize their services, deliver new digital capabilities, and delight customers on every step of their journey. eBusiness, marketing, and customer experience teams are eagerly adopting new software to deliver these digital experiences. At times, they chose a conscious uncoupling from the CIO’s team in order to move quickly and stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

Unfortunately, the mismatch of customer-facing teams scrambling to build new digital services while CIOs and their teams hunker down to cut cost and risk has caused a disconnect on the role of technology management in delivering great experiences. In a new Forrester report, Closing The Experience Gaps, my colleague Ted Schadler and I interviewed more than 35 companies and analyzed survey results from 3,502 US consumers, we uncovered this misalignment and identified the four experience gaps that result (see Figure 1).

Figure 1 Experience Delivery Requires A New Architecture And Philosophy

Read more

Closing The Experience Gaps Requires A New Technology Architecture And Philosophy

Ted Schadler

Forrester’s Customer Experience Index (CXi) research reveals a shocking business result: Over five years, CXi leaders outperformed the S&P with 43% stock growth, while CXi laggards had negative returns of -34%. (See this Forrester report to learn about our new customer experience index.)

As a result, firms are in an arms race to mobilize their services, deliver new digital capabilities, and delight customers on every step of their journey. eBusiness, marketing, and customer experience teams are eagerly adopting new software to deliver these digital experiences. At times, they chose a conscious uncoupling from the CIO’s team in order to move quickly and stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

Unfortunately, the mismatch of customer-facing teams scrambling to build new digital services while CIOs and their teams hunker down to cut cost and risk has caused a disconnect on the role of technology management in delivering great experiences. In a new Forrester report, Closing The Experience Gaps, my colleague John C. McCarthy and I interviewed more than 35 companies and analyzed survey results from 3,502 US consumers, we uncovered this misalignment and identified the four experience gaps that result (see Figure 1).

Figure 1 Experience Delivery Requires A New Architecture And Philosophy

Read more

Analyst Spotlight Podcast With Tyler Shields

Stephanie Balaouras

Introducing The New S&R Monthly Podcast!

The Forrester S&R team has doubled in size during the last several years. Today, we're 17 analysts and researchers across the US, Europe, and India, 19 if you count the research associates that support every project. Given the size of the team and the degree to which analysts have been able to specialize, we decided that we'd take a little time each month to highlight each member of the team in one of our bi-monthly newsletters and in a short podcast. If you're not signed up for our newsletters, I highly encourage you to do so, please email srfl@forrester.com for additional details. In the meantime, click below to listen to our analyst spotlight on Senior Analyst, Tyler Shields.

S&R Podcast Listening Options

Click here to download the MP3 file of this episode. 

Lost In Data Translation? Forrester's Data Taxonomy To The Rescue

Boris Evelson
  • When it comes to data technology, are you lost in translation? What's the difference between data federation, virtualization, and data or information-as-a-service? Are columnar databases also relational? Does one use the same or different tools for BAM (Business Activity Monitoring) and for CEP (Complex Event Processing)? These questions are just the tip of the iceberg of a plethora of terms and definitions in the rich and complex world of enterprise data and information. Enterprise application developers, data, and information architects manage multiple challenges on a daily basis already, and the last thing they need to deal with are misunderstandings of the various data technology component definitions.
Read more

The Future Of Government Is Digital

Nigel Fenwick

Last March, we published The Future Of Business Is Digital and predicted that all businesses must evolve to become digital businesses. Since then, many CIOs in government agencies have asked about the role of digital in government. And yesterday, on The White House Blog, the president made it clear where he stands: The future of government is digital!

In announcing the creation of the US Digital Service, President Obama is reinforcing the need to bring greater agility to federal technology management in service of citizen taxpayers who foot the bill.

"A core part of the President’s Management Agenda is improving the value we deliver to citizens through Federal IT. That’s why, today, the Administration is formally launching the U.S. Digital Service. The Digital Service will be a small team made up of our country’s brightest digital talent that will work with agencies to remove barriers to exceptional service delivery and help remake the digital experience that people and businesses have with their government."

Read more

IBM Doubles Down Cloud IAM And Acquires Lighthouse Gateway

Andras Cser

On the heels of the CrossIdeas acquisition (about which we have recently published a QuickTake), IBM today acquired another IAM cloud provider, Lighthouse Security Group. Its product and service, Lighhouse Gateway, is a small cloud provider that appeared in our Cloud IAM Wave and we were impressed by the "slickness" and ease-of-use of its customer interface for administration (policy management) and also for end users (Lighthouse Gateway provides its own front-end to ISIM and ISAM).

 

Now we recommend that IAM security and risk professionals should ask IBM the following questions about the acquisition:

1) How will IBM offer Lighthouse Gateway? Will it be an add-on to ISIM and ISAM licenses or will it be a standalone offering or both?

2) How will IBM integrate the beautiful user interface of Lighthouse Gateway into ISIM and ISAM on-premises offerings?

3) How will the new IBM IAM access governance ecosystem of ISIM+CrossIdeas be merged with Lighthouse Gateway?

Bridging The CIO/CMO Disconnect In Asia

Fred Giron

It’s a fact: Marketers in Asia purchase digital technologies without involving the tech management department. They do it because they believe that:

  • Digital technologies are key enablers of successful marketing strategies. Customers in Asia Pacific in general, and in Singapore in particular, are always connected and empowered by technology to access the right information in their moments of need. They increasingly value — and do business with — organizations that provide them with experiences that are effective, easy, and emotional across all customer touchpoints. It’s not a surprise, then to see marketing professionals — just like their colleagues in sales, product management, and customer service — source digital technologies to enable such experiences.
  • The tech management department hinders their business success. This is the more worrying part, but if you take a step back, as a technology management professional, you understand why. You work with technology life cycles that are oriented toward core business, back-end systems like enterprise resource planning and therefore are risk-averse and slow. However, marketers need tech management professionals who are open to innovation, experimentation, and moving toward a risk-tolerant, agile life cycle that supports digital experience delivery.
Read more

Forrester’s 2014 Data Privacy Heat Map Highlights Rampant Government Surveillance And Increased Regulation Around The Globe

Christopher Sherman

Corporations spend a lot of time and money to ensure their employee- and customer-facing technologies are compliant with all local and regional data privacy laws. However, this task is made challenging by the patchwork of data privacy legislation around the world, with countries ranging from holding no restrictions on the use of personal data to countries with highly restrictive frameworks. To help our clients address these challenges, Forrester developed a research and planning tool called the Data Privacy Heat Map (try the demo version here). Originally published in 2010, the tool leverages in-depth analyses of the privacy-related laws and cultures of 54 countries around the world, helping our clients better strategize their own global privacy and data protection approaches. 

 

              
 

The most recent update to the tool, which published today, highlights two opposing trends affecting data privacy over the past 12 months:

  • Increased government surveillance continues to impede the free flow of information. Corporations worry that storing or processing data within the borders of a country with high levels of governmental surveillance could place their intellectual property at risk. Notable additions to the tool's growing list of countries with lowered barriers to government surveillance include the US, Germany, and the UK.
Read more

Empower Your Digital Business With Forrester’s India 2014 Summit For CIOs

Manish Bahl

Every business and industry faces digital disruption today. Digitally empowered customers demand a much higher level of customer obsession to win and keep their business, and they are forcing firms to redefine their business models. Whether you are in banking, insurance, financial services, education, media and entertainment — essentially, in any industry — digital technologies will disrupt your business. Nevertheless, our research shows that firms currently favor a bolt-on digital strategy over digital transformation, but this will drive only limited value from their digital investments. Digital strategy is not about adding a new mobile app or building a social media presence. It requires a fundamental shift in business strategy, responsibilities, technology capabilities, and organizational structure.

Against this backdrop, Forrester is holding its third series of CIO Summits across Asia Pacific in August and September. The India summit is on August 21, 2014 in Mumbai with the theme of: "Beyond IT: Empower Digital Business In The Age Of The Customer." Just like last year, we expect around 150 CIOs to attend the event. The Summit will focus on the significant shift we’ve seen in CIOs' traditional focus — from the design and deployment of internal systems focused on process control to digital products and services for their customers. Of particular importance on the digital journey are three domains:

- Customer experience.

- The mobile mind shift.

- The transformation of big data into actionable business insights.

Read more

Why You Need To Add "Cyber" To Your Job Title

Andrew Rose

Sometimes ambiguity has power — the power to capture the zeitgeist of a movement, culture, or vision without getting dragged into the weeds about what really is or isn’t included; it provides time for an idea to crystallize, become defined, or reach critical mass.

That (somewhat arcane opening paragraph) sums up where I feel we are with regard to the term "cyber." We all know that it has crept into the security and risk (S&R) lexicon over the past few years, but, by managing to avoid clear definition, it’s become all things to all men — a declaration that “information security is different now” but not quite saying how. Think about it: If the US Department of Defence and the standards body NIST aren't aligned on their definitions of cybersecurity, how can we expect CISOs and business execs to be?

I have spoken to numerous S&R leaders recently, and, although there was a fair amount of discord, the CISO of one global financial services organization best summarized the prevailing perception:

"’Cyber’ is something coming from the Internet attacking our infrastructure assets. We're not classifying internal incidents as cyber, otherwise it makes no sense for us to have another word for something that is a classical security incident. It's about the external and internal distinction."

Cartoon included by kind permission of http://www.kaltoons.com/

Read more