SAP and S4HANA

George Lawrie

Many of your peers with heavy enterprise investment in SAP, are thinking about the business case for HANA.  In this research we looked at different HANA use cases and at early efforts to learn how to run an enterprise by predicting, in real time, the direction of a stream of granular observations, rather than by waiting for period end and then explaining variances from plan :   https://www.forrester.com/SAP+Hana+Is+The+Answer+Whats+The+Question/fulltext/-/E-RES117654

But now some firms are migrating to Suite on HANA or more correctly SAP Business Suite Powered By HANA in search of digital transformation opportunities such as the ability to manufacture a batch of one or to target a segment of one. More firms are planning to investigate S4HANA to simplify and streamline their data and processes to get in shape for the more intense competition of a more transparent and digitally empowered economy. We looked here at the stages in planning the transitions the skills and help you will need : https://www.forrester.com/Brief+Plan+The+Next+Phase+Of+Your+SAP+Journey/fulltext/-/E-res122841

Look out for the next in the series in which we investigate HANA scalability.

Enterprise Architecture Awards 2015 – Effectiveness And Innovation Lays The Path To Value

Alex Cullen

One of the winners of this year’s Forrester/Infoworld Enterprise Architecture Awards segmented their EA practice into two disciplines: Innovation Architecture and Effectiveness Architecture. These two words describe the range of winners selected by our judges.

Before I announce the winners, let me tell you about why these two words are significant. The Forrester/Infoworld EA Awards have always sought to uncover programs that impact their business through the insight and value that only EA can provide. But many EA programs struggle with this – and the reason for this struggle lies more in themselves than in their context. Bottom line: They focus on "doing architecture" or on "being smart technical experts." Many talk about being more business-focused but aren’t willing to change their thinking or how they engage with their business.

The five winners of this year’s awards have changed their approach to EA and delivering business impact, and the results show.

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Forrester’s Server-Hosted Virtual Desktop (VDI) Wave Reveals Two Vendors Lead The Pack

David Johnson
With server-hosted virtual desktops (VDI), you take something that used to be a few centimeters from someone's fingertips - their Windows desktop - and move it sometimes thousands of miles away, and you expect them to be okay with that. It’s possible, but choose your technology vendor wisely, because the project’s success will hinge on the end user experience.
 
It’s not easy to give users an equal or better Windows desktop experience with VDI than they have with their local PC. If they rely on videoconferencing to collaborate with their colleagues, the VDI system has to work with their local webcam and it has to handle the video stream properly so they don’t get choppy voice and video. If they use a tablet, your VDI vendor’s tablet client has to be good, with intuitive touch gestures. There may need to be a way for them to install software, and they may need to use the system over a 4G/LTE network link while traveling.
 
To do all of these things and more across a wide range of work styles, devices, applications and networks requires sophisticated, expensive capabilities. If you choose your vendor primarily on cost, the solution you get may not have what you need to deliver an acceptable user experience - especially if your business needs change.
 
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3 Ways To Squeeze Your SAP Maintenance Costs

Mark Bartrick

This is the first post in a series on strategies and tactics for negotiating your licensing agreements with software companies including SAP, Salesforce, and Workday

I recently had a call from an unhappy SAP customer moaning about the high costs of SAP’s annual maintenance and questioning whether they are getting good value for the money. I’m afraid that this is not a one-off conversation but something that is popping up regularly these days. The factors leading to the dissatisfaction include:

  • CIOs are keen to shift spend from boring legacy IT like paying maintenance on infrastructure to new, more exciting stuff — what Forrester calls business technology — that help win, serve and retain customers.
  • Hard economic times re-focus procurement’s lens back on to those large chunks of money that vendors want for maintenance.
  • SAP has been increasing maintenance costs to try to get everyone paying 22% of the net license costs each year.
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B2B eCommerce Sites Must Look Beyond "Rogue" Buyers

Duncan Jones

If you’re trying to use e-commerce in a B2B context, it is no longer safe to ignore the procurement role within your customers’ organization. At the moment you may be able to market and sell successfully direct to end-user customers, but not for long. The growing imperative for chief procurement officers (CPOs) to guarantee compliance with various external laws and internal policies is driving a much tougher stance on so-called rogue buying.

I’ve been studying the customer’s side of B2B e-commerce for a number of years. The clients I speak with work in procurement, finance, and the part of I.T. that supports those two functions. One of their most common questions is: “how can I prevent employees buying stuff directly from sell-side websites?” This used to be purely due to concerns about cost—they assumed that their e-procurement application would direct employees to approved suppliers who would, they believed, be the cheapest. Now, however, the bigger issue is supplier risk. Issues such as corporate social responsibility, conflict minerals, corrupt practices, data security, and so on, are forcing CPOs to be much tougher in preventing purchases from unapproved suppliers.

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The Top Tech Trends To Watch: 2016 To 2018 — Should Help Accelerate CIOs’ BT Agenda

Bobby Cameron

CIOs already face significant pressure to understand and respond to digitally empowered customers. And as their firms’ customer experience (CX) focus intensifies, CIOs must bring digital into the heart of customer engagements — leveraging technology to assure high value end to end across the customer life cycle.

The next wave of tech trends to watch — 2016 to 2018 — support tech management’s move to the heart of digital CX implementation. Today’s mainstream CX investment path has individual organizations making point investments in the latest technology inventions — like social, mobile, big data, cloud, and analytics. But today’s leading firms are delivering solutions that reach end to end across customers’ journeys and across systems that connect the employees who service the customer life cycle. And these trends will accelerate over the next three years.

We see the top tech trends making this shift in three phases from 2016 through 2018:

■        Visionaries will dominate dawning phase trends as they drive point inventions to address specific business organizations’ opportunities.

■        Fast followers will discover the limits of point solutions in the awareness phase and begin to work through the challenges of end-to-end innovation.

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Data Governance and Data Management Are Not Interchangeable

Michele Goetz

Since when did data management and data governance become interchangeable?

This is a question that has both confounded and frustrated me.  The pursuit of data management vendors to connect with business stakeholders, because of the increasing role business units have had in decison making and holding the purse strings to technology purchases, means data governance as a term was hijacked to snuff out the bad taste of IT data projects gone sour. 

The funny thing is, vendors actually began drinking their own marketing Kool-aid and think of their MDM, quality, security, and lifecycle management products as data governance tools/solutions.  Storage and virtualizations vendors are even starting to grock on to this claiming they govern data. Big data vendors jumped over data management altogether and just call their catalogs, security, and lineage capabilities data governance.  

Yes, this is a pet peeve of mine - just as data integration is now called blending, and data cleansing and transformation is now called wrangling or data preparation. But more on that is another blog...

First, you (vendor or data professional) cannot simply sweep the history of legacy data investments that were limited in results and painful to implement under the MadMen carpet. Own it and address the challenges through technology innovation rather than words.

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BI and data integration professionals face a multitude of overlapping data preparation options

Boris Evelson

Ah, the good old days. The world used to be simple. ETL vendors provided data integration functionality, DBMS vendors data warehouse platforms and BI vendors concentrated on reporting, analysis and data visualization. And they all lived happily ever after without stepping on each others’ toes and benefiting from lucrative partnerships. Alas, the modern world of BI and data integration is infinitely more complex with multiple, often overlapping offerings from data integration and BI vendors. I see the following three major segments in the market of preparing data for BI:

  1. Fully functional and highly scalable ETL platforms that are used for integrating analytical data as well as moving, synchronizing and replicating operational, transactional data. This is still the realm of tech professionals who use ETL products from Informatica, AbInitio, IBM, Oracle, Microsoft and others.
  2. An emerging market of data preparation technologies that specialize mostly in integrating data for BI use cases and mostly run by business users. Notable vendors in the space include Alteryx, Paxata, Trifecta, Datawatch, Birst, and a few others.
  3. Data preparation features built right into BI platforms. Most leading BI vendors today provide such capabilities to a varying degree.
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OpenStack Is Now Ready For Business

Paul Miller

The open source cloud computing project, OpenStack, has a reputation as a bit of a science project; technologically interesting, fine for those who don’t mind getting their hands dirty, but not something that normal companies are going to depend upon for anything serious or important.

That reputation, although possibly justifiable a year or two back, really doesn’t stand up to close scrutiny anymore. And that’s what my very first (short) Forrester report argues.

OpenStack is now ready for business, but implementation is not without its challenges.

As part of the selection process here at Forrester, prospective analysts prepare a short report in the Forrester style. They also deliver a presentation based upon that report, and defend their hypothesis in the face of some pointed questioning.

An earlier version of this report was my interview piece, which I wrote back in June. The tone and broad argument remain pretty true to the original, but a number of my new colleagues proved invaluable in deepening arguments, augmenting assertions with more data, and enriching the whole with extra endnotes and links to additional resources. Lauren Nelson, in particular, contributed a wealth of material gathered during her own work for May’s longer OpenStack Is Ready - Are You? Today’s document may have begun life as ‘mine’ (cue Gollum impression), but the piece that Forrester clients can now download is very much a team effort. This, I hear, will be a recurring theme here!

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Forrester’s Security & Risk Spotlight – Chris Sherman

Stephanie Balaouras

Forrester’s Security & Risk Analyst Spotlight - Chris Sherman

The title hasn’t yet been put to client vote, but Chris Sherman may be the renaissance man of Forrester’s S&R team. As an analyst, Chris advises clients on data security across all endpoints, giving him a broad perspective on current security trends. His experience as a neuroscience researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital also gives him insight into the particular challenges that Forrester’s clients in the healthcare industry face. Lastly, when he hasn’t been writing about endpoint security strategy or studying neural synapse firings, Chris flies Cessna 172’s around New England. Listen to this week’s podcast to learn about recent themes in Chris’s client inquiries as well as the troubles facing a particular endpoint security technology.

Chris Sherman Image

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