Digital Disruption And The Electronic Medical Record

Skip Snow

For those of us who write and think about the future of healthcare, the story of rapid and systemic change rocking the healthcare system is a recurrent theme. We usually point to the regulatory environment as the source of change. Laws like the Affordable Care Act and the HITECH Act are such glaring disruptive forces, but what empowers these regulations to succeed? Perhaps the deepest cause of change affecting healthcare, and the most disruptive force, is the digitalization of our clinical records. As we continue to switch to electronic charts, this force of  the vast data being collected becomes increasingly obvious. One-fifth of the world’s data is purported to be administrative and clinical medical records. Recording medical observations, lab results, diagnoses, and the orders that care professionals make in binary form is a game-changer.

Workflows are dramatically altered because caregivers spend so much of their time using the system to record clinical facts and must balance these record-keeping responsibilities with the more traditional bedside skills. They have access to more facts more easily than before, which allows them to make better judgments. The increasing ability of caregivers to see what their colleagues are doing, or have done, across institutional boundaries is allowing for better coordination of care. The use of clinical data for research into what works and what is efficient is becoming pervasive. This research is conducted by combining records from several institutions and having the quality committees of individual institutions look at the history of care within their institutions to enhance the ways in which they create the institutional standards of care. The data represents a vast resource of evidence that allows great innovation.

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As You Prepare for VMworld 2014, Educate Yourself On Digital Workspace Technologies

David Johnson
Bill Gates said "People everywhere love Windows.” Whether or not you agree, the fact that Microsoft Windows remains the de facto standard for business productivity after nearly 3 decades, suggests that many still do. But as the sales figures of Microsoft’s competitors suggest, people everywhere love lots of other things too. And one of the reasons they love them so much is that they like to get things done, and sometimes that means getting away from the office to a quiet place, or using a technology that isn’t constrained by corporate policies and controls, so they can be freer to experiment, grow their skills and develop their ideas uninhibited.
 
Technology managers I speak with are aware of this, but they’re justifiably paranoid about security, costs, and complexity. So the result of these conflicting forces coming together is inspiring rapid innovation in a mosaic of technologies that Forrester collectively calls digital workspace delivery systems. It involves many vendors, including Microsoft, Citrix, VMware, Dell, nComputing, Amazon Web Services, Fujitsu, AppSense, Moka5, and more. The goal of our work is to help companies develop their capabilities for delivering satisfying Microsoft Windows desktop and application experiences to a wide range of users, devices, and locations.
 
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Make Your Next Storage Array An App

Henry Baltazar

Storage has been confined to hardware appliance form factors for far too long.  Over the past two decades, innovation in the storage space has transitioned from proprietry hardware controllers and processors to proprietary software running on commodity X86 hardware.  The hardware driving backup appliances, NAS systems, iSCSI arrays, and object storage systems, are often quite similar in terms of processors and components, yet despite this fact I&O professionals are still used to purchasing single purpose systems which lock customers into a technology stack. 

Over the past few years, companies such as HP (StoreVirtual VSA), Nexenta, Sanbolic and Maxta have released software-only storage offerings to complete head to head with proprietrary hardware appliances, and have found some success with cost conscious enterprises and service providers.  The software-only storage revolution is now ready for primetime with startup offerings now reaching maturity and established players such as IBM, EMC and NetApp jumping into the market.

I&O professionals should consider software only storage since: 

The storage technology acquisition process is broken.  Any storage purchase you complete today will be bound to your datacenter for the next 3 to 5 years.  When business stakeholders and clients need storage resources for emerging use cases such as object storage and flash storage, these parties often do not have the luxury of time to wait for storage teams to complete RFPs and product evaluations.  With software-only storage access to new technology can be accelerated to meet the provisioning velocity needs of customers.

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Cognitive Computing Forum: 7 Things You Need To Know

Michele Goetz

Day one of the first Cognitive Computing Forum in San Jose, hosted by Dataversity, gave a great perspective on the state of cognitive computing; promising, but early.  I am here this week with my research director Leslie Owens and analyst colleague Diego LoGudice.  Gathering research for a series of reports for our cognitive engagement coverage, we were able to debrief tonight on what we heard and the questions these insights raise.  Here are some key take-aways:

1)  Big data mind shift to explore and accept failure is a heightened principle.  Chris Welty, formerly at IBM and a key developer of Watson and it's Jeoapardy winning solution, preached restraint.  Analytic pursuit of perfect answers delivers no business value.  Keep your eye on the prize and move the needle on what matters, even if your batting average is only .300 (30%).  The objective is a holistic pursuit of optimization.

2)  The algorithms aren't new, the platform capabilities and greater access to data allow us to realize cognitive for production uses.  Every speaker from academic, vendor, and expert was in agreement that the algorithms created decades ago are the same.  Hardware and the volume of available data have made neural networks and other machine learning algorithms both possible and more effective.  

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Introducing a new Senior Analyst

Hello, world. Welcome to my first blog as a new Senior Analyst serving Application Development & Delivery professionals.

I come to Forrester after working in the Solution Marketing and Corporate Marketing groups at a large customer service software provider. That role put me in touch with contact center technology buyers and the overburdened folks responsible for actually making great customer service happen every day. I saw close up the impact of the age of the customer on the thinking, processes, behavior, and technology choices of contact center professionals around the world. They are facing a world in which consumers are much less willing to settle for mediocre and impersonal experiences when dealing with customer service organizations. As consumers we all want effortless service delivered via whatever channel is most convenient at the moment, and we want companies to know just the right amount of information about us, but not too much, at the moment of the interaction.

That is a very tough nut to crack for contact center managers, supervisors, and agents. My research coverage will primarily focus on two areas that can help contact center pros begin to address these issues:

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CEM For Telcos: Just Started With A Lot More Potentials

Bryan Wang

Telcos across the world — and especially mobile operators — are now struggling with increasing network complexity and lower customer satisfaction due to exploding data traffic, decreasing ARPU, and OTTs marginalizing their opportunities to generate new revenues via content. The Japanese market, with one of the highest ARPUs, has been the battlefield for technology providers to offer local telcos to services their high-value customers in a country where people have very high expectations of telecommunications services. Two weeks ago, I participated in Nokia Networks’ analyst days in Tokyo and was interested to see how the company has increased its share in Japan in the past couple of years. To continue its success in the age of the customer, Nokia Networks must help Japanese telcos better win, serve, and retain customers.

Two days of briefings and discussions convinced me that Nokia Networks’ must address three critical items to maintain its leadership position in LTE radio in Japan:

  1. Optimizing its networks to make its coverage and performance the best it can be in this very high-density market.
  2. Introducing customized features from its Japan R&D lab to meet the most demanding operators in the world.
  3. Helping telcos meet or overfulfill their customers’ expectations via a customer experience management (CEM) solution, although the revenue contribution is much smaller. Obviously, what customers experience and perceive are what really decides how effective all of the network improvements have been.
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Everyone Needs To Digitize Their Business — But Not Every Business Knows What To Do

Clement Teo

Every business must transform into a digital business. Digital businesses continuously exploit digital technologies to create new sources of value for their customers and increase their operational agility to serve those customers. In Asia Pacific, CIOs have had limited success in driving digital business transformation. Organizations taking an early lead in transforming their business include Commonwealth Bank of Australia, China’s Ping An Insurance Group, and DBS Bank in Singapore.

A true digital business needs to integrate two sides of a digital strategy: digital customer experience and digital operational excellence. My colleague Nigel Fenwick has written extensively on the topic; this infographic, for example, sums up our thinking. Becoming a truly digital business requires a radical overhaul of organizational structures, technologies, measurement frameworks, and operating models. And it’s ongoing.

The organizations coping best with digital disruption are creating:

  • A digital strategy as a defense mechanism against disruption. The pace of consumer change poses the biggest threat to any traditional businesses that have yet to experience the impact of digital disruption, regardless of whether they’re in the telecommunications, media and entertainment, transportation and travel, or other industry. For example, Australia Post has set up a A$2 billion kitty to aggressively pursue a digital strategy to tap into new revenue sources, including building a new center for the digital delivery of mobile and online products and services.
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Digital Transformation Is Changing The Market For Consulting - Observations About Internal Cultural Transformation At PWC

Dan Bieler

Professional services firms must go through their own digital transformation before they can truly help their customers. In this comment we highlight some observations we made during a recent analyst event of one of the leading global professional services firms PWC.

Digital strategies will not translate into sustainable business models for the digital age

PWC is right to state that customers do not need digital strategies. Instead, they need support to prepare themselves for the digital age. But digital transformation projects are not so much about technology as about redesigning business models and changing the style of doing business. Hence, successful CIOs recognize that:

  • Cultural transformation is the main challenge for digital transformation. Digital businesses map out customer journeys and ensure that products turn into plug-ins for broader digital propositions. These propositions are connected through data, communities, and collaboration. This allows the business to understand who the customers are and how they use products. It’s easier to implement technology innovations than to change habits and culture. Technology is only the catalyst for cultural and organizational transformation. The transition of Philips towards a vendor of digital propositions is a case in point.
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Planning Your Big Data Strategy: Five Keys To Success

Martha Bennett

To compete in the age of the customer, it’s essential to make the most of the data you have access to, whether it’s from internal or external sources. For most organizations, this implies a need to review and challenge existing approaches to how they capture, process, and use data to support decision-making. But it’s important first of all to move beyond a technology-centric view of big data. This is why at Forrester, we define big data as:

The practices and technologies that close the gap between the data available and the ability to turn that data into business insight.

Moving beyond a technology-centric view doesn’t mean, however, that a bottom-up, technology-led approach to big data strategy won’t work. After all, it’s often the case that business executives can’t see the potential of a technology until they’ve seen it in action. A bottom-up approach also provides the opportunity to acquire technical skills, and gain an understanding of what needs to be done to integrate new technologies with existing systems (even if it’s just at the level of getting the data out – often easier said than done). But a pilot project or proof-of-concept demonstrating the “art of the possible” in a business context is different from implementing a Hadoop cluster and expecting the business side to start asking for projects.

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Watch Out! Networking Professionals Can Be Fired For Buying The Market Leader

Andre Kindness

The recent business articles about customers screaming for change, such as Bloomberg’s recently published article about Goldman Sachs’ CIO threatening Cisco, conjures up images of Dee Snider busting through the wall and screaming, “OH, WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT ANYMORE! WE'VE GOT THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE, AND THERE AIN'T NO WAY WE'LL LOSE IT! THIS IS OUR LIFE.” Connecting customers, employees, and business resources has become a life-or-death element for businesses (see The Enterprise Network Enables Business Innovation).

Am I being overly dramatic? I would like you to name a technology that the entire market openly voiced their displeasure about and forced a market leader to come up with a new strategy like Cisco’s Application Centric Infrastructure. Sure, the market has gone through transitions like the movement from fat access points to controller-based access points and the implementation of server virtualization, but the difference between those transitions and the current one is that these technologies were created before customers demanded them.

Now we have customers defining what they want before the technology exists or even creating their solutions, such as:

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