Chipotle Used Video To Address Its Entire Workforce. Could You?

Nick Barber

What happens when your business is food and it sickens 500 people? If you’re Chipotle you close your stores and produce an all-hands video address with your executives.

The company closed its 1,971 US stores on Monday for four hours so that employees could attend a company meeting hosted by its co-CEOs Monty Moran and Steve Ells.

The setup was elaborate with studio lights, multiple cameras and a teleprompter. Chipotle took this seriously and while the content of the address was for employees the pomp and circumstance was for the public.

 

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Placing Your Bets On Oracle’s Cloud Fusion Solutions?

Joe Galuszka

Oracle's co-CEOs Safra Catz and Mark Hurd had very positive remarks regarding Oracle's Q2 performance: total revenues of $9 billion exceeded guidance, SaaS and PaaS bookings growth of 75% with revenue of $487 million up 38%. Meanwhile on-premise software revenues (software license, updates, and support) were flat at $6.4 billion.

Currently Oracle's sales professionals are working feverishly in the final weeks of closing Q3 on February 29 to keep this momentum moving in the right revenue direction to meet Q3 and Q4 guidance expectations. Then comes the fourth quarter and EOY revenue execution where we expect 40% of Oracle's full year revenue to be booked. Here's what we're seeing in the marketplace and from our client interactions and consulting projects.

  1. Cloud Fusion momentum fueled by spirited sales. We are absolutely seeing the SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS revenue and client momentum being reported in Oracle's Q2 earnings release. We are also experiencing the sales tactics being employed to drive this aggressive growth – based on lucrative sales commission incentives and selling cloud products “credits” to reduce on-premise cost and support fees. We're seeing the same highly competitive sales game from Salesforce and Workday, among others.
  2. Play Oracle's sales game — or don't. Oracle's account teams are infamous for their siloed divide-and-conquer approach to selling applications, database, and hardware. We advise our clients to effectively manage Oracle's sales teams by executive escalation and staying focused on business issues to receive the value they are paying for.
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Five things your Microsoft sales person doesn’t want you to know

Mark Bartrick

I love Costa Coffee shops. Not only do they keep my caffeine levels sustained but their ambience always seems to get my creative juices flowing. Here’s one of my more recent ruminations: wouldn’t it be great if software companies always did the right thing for their customers?

Imagine this world for a moment:

●     Software vendors only ever selling you what you need.

●     Software vendors offering pricing and discounting that is always fair, logical, and transparent.

●     Software vendor sales people who openly admit that a competitive product may actually be a better fit for their customer as opposed to trying to shoehorn in their own products at every opportunity.

Unfortunately that’s not the way the software world works — at least not for the mega vendors.

And speaking of mega vendors, Microsoft’s fiscal year wraps up at the end of June so I thought it would be timely to share with you some insight into what you might soon be facing. Here are five things that your Microsoft sales person doesn’t want you to know:

1.       Enterprise Agreement price hikes: If you have an Enterprise Agreement (EA) renewal coming up then Microsoft will be expecting to dump a price hike on you of at least 10%. This is because your EA price-locked your Microsoft products when you signed it, and it has protected you from all the various product price rises that have occurred in the last three years. But when you renew your EA, all those lovely price rises catch up and form the basis of how your next EA is priced. Hence the hike.

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Infrastructure As Code, The Missing Element In The I&O Agenda

Robert Stroud

For many years, infrastructure and operations (I&O) professionals have been dedicated to delivering services at lower costs and ever greater efficiency, but the business technology (BT) agenda requires innovation that delivers top-line growth.

 

The evolution and success of digital business models is leading I&O organizations to disrupt their traditional infrastructure models to pursue cloud strategies and new infrastructure architectures and mindsets that closely resemble cloud models.

 

Such a cloud-first strategy supports the business agenda for agility, rapid innovation, and delivery of solutions. This drives customer acquisition and retention and extends the focus beyond ad hoc projects to their complete technology stack. The transition to cloud-first mandates a transition for infrastructure delivery, management, and maintenance to support its delivery and consumption as a reusable software component. Such infrastructure can be virtual or physical and consumed as required, without lengthy build and deployment cycles.

 

Growing cloud maturity, the move of systems of record to the cloud (see my blog “Driving Systems of Records to the Cloud, your focus for 2016!)container growth, extensive automation, and availability of "infrastructure as code" change the roles within I&O, as far less traditional administration is needed. I&O must transition from investing in traditional administration to the design, selection, and management of the tooling it needs for composable infrastructure.

 

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Selecting Professional Service Provider For Your Business Intelligence/Information Management/Analytics/Big Data Projects

Boris Evelson

You've done all the right things by following your enterprise vendor selection methodology. You created an RFI and sent it out to all of the vendors on your "approved" list. You then filtered out the responses based on your requirements, and sent out a detailed RFP. You created a detailed scoring methodology, reviewed the proposals, listened to the in-person presentations, and filtered out everyone but the top respondents. But you still ended up with more than one. What do you do?

If you shortlisted two or more market leaders (see Forrester's latest evaluation)  I would not agonize over who has better methodologies, reference architectures, training, project execution and risk management, etc. They all have top of the line capabilities in all of the above. Rather, I'd concentrate on the following specifics
 
People
  • The vendor who proposed more specific named individuals to the project, and you reviewed and liked their resumes, gets an edge over a vendor who only proposed general roles to be staffed at the time of the project kick off.
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Zuckerberg’s VR Baby Videos Signal Challenges For OVPs

Nick Barber
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg plans to use 360-degree video to capture his daughter Max’s first steps. VR video will immerse family members into the scene, but leave traditional online video platforms scratching their heads. 
 
Virtual reality, or 360 video is video that is shot in all directions at once, typically with two or more cameras. The resulting footage is stitched together and then viewers can scroll around the scene and focus on their points of interest. Hardware for capturing the content ranges in price from $350 to $60,000 or more. 
 
[Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg with users on the 12th anniversary of the social network.]
 
VR video can certainly be useful outside of the obvious media and entertainment vertical. Nescafe used it to show the farms where their coffee comes from and Qantas made a tourism pitch for Australia. IBM used 360 video to show it’s data bunker during the US Open tennis tournament last year. 

 

Some of the biggest challenges for Application Development & Delivery pros supporting 360 video include:

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Forrester's Top CRM Trends For 2016 And Beyond

Kate Leggett

In the age of the customer, executives don't decide how customer-centric their companies are — customers do. And while good customer experiences can help control costs, executives are more interested in the potential for sustainable top-line growth. 

Forrester defines CRM as:

The business processes and supporting technologies that support the key activities of targeting, acquiring, retaining, understanding, and collaborating with customers.

CRM is the foundational building block of a company's customer experience strategy to win, serve, and retain customers. It allows empowered consumers and connected employees to do business in ways we just couldn’t conceive of just a few years ago.

Here is a snapshot of 3 of our top 10 trends that you should pay attention to in 2016 and beyond. You can access our full report here.

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Salesforce Announces New Pricing And Packaging -- What It Means To You

Liz Herbert

After more than a decade of keeping its published pricing largely unchanged, Salesforce today announced new pricing and packaging for its core products.

What you need to know:

  • Pricing will go up for core editions. New Sales and Service Cloud Lightning Editions will come in three flavors: Professional Edition (PE) -- $75; Enterprise Edition (EE) -- $150; Unlimited Edition (UE) -- $300. The pricing will now be identical for Sales and Service subscriptions. (Previously, Sales Cloud was cheaper than Service Cloud and was a subset of the functionality that came with Service Cloud. More on the functionality implications below.)
  • The new "Lightning" packaging comes with enhanced functionality. PE adds Workflow, Console Light, Profiles, Record Types, Unlimited Apps & Tabs. EE adds Full Console, more Sandboxes, two-factor mobile identity, Unlimited Apps & Tabs. UE has more Sandboxes than before. You can see the announced pricing and packaging for all editions in the graphics below.
  • The “Russian doll” model will go away. In the past, Salesforce packaging was analogous to Russian dolls: Service Cloud encapsulated Sales Cloud, which encapsulated Force, which encapsulated Chatter. The new packaging breaks this model and means that a Service Cloud buyer will no longer get full access to Sales Cloud. Instead, there will be a bundled price for customers who choose to buy Sales and Service Cloud seats together. Both Sales and Service Cloud will still come with Force and Chatter.
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Hadoop, Spark, and the emerging big data landscape

Paul Miller

Not very long ago, it would have been almost inconceivable to consider a new large-scale data analysis project in which the open source Apache Hadoop did not play a pivotal role.

Every Hadoop blog post needs a picture of an elephant. (Source: Paul Miller)

Then, as so often happens, the gushing enthusiasm became more nuanced. Hadoop, some began (wrongly) to mutter, was "just about MapReduce." Hadoop, others (not always correctly) suggested, was "slow."

Then newer tools came along. Hadoop, a growing cacophony (innacurately) trumpeted, was "not as good as Spark."

But, in the real world, Hadoop continues to be great at what it's good at. It's just not good at everything people tried throwing in its direction. We really shouldn't be surprised by this. And yet, it seems, so many of us are.

For CIOs asked to drive new programmes of work in which big data plays a part (and few are not), the competing claims in this space are both unhelpful and confusing. Hadoop and Spark are not, despite some suggestions, directly equivalent. In many cases, asking "Hadoop or Spark" is simply the wrong question.

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Expectations For Mobile World Congress 2016

Dan Bieler

The last year has flown by: In just a few weeks the Mobile World Congress (MWC) is on again. So what can we expect from the leading global get-together of mobile-heads this year? In my view there will be:

  • Less hype concerning mobile device launches. The leading smartphone and tablet providers will announce or showcase new models of established product lines, including more wearables and watches, like Samsung’s Galaxy S7, Sony’s Xperia Z6, LG’s G5, Huawei’s P9, HTC’s One M10, and Microsoft’s Surface Phone as well as newcomers like the Nextbit Robin or the OnePlus 2 Mini. Yet, I expect more of an evolution than a revolution. Blackberry might provide more insights into its future as device manufacturer beyond the Priv. Both Apple and Google will announce their upcoming devices at their own respective events, not at MWC. I am interested to see which way the pendulum is swinging: device commoditization or real new innovation. I expect the former.
  • Increasingly intertwined messaging of big data and IoT vendors. Big data will play an important part in most IoT solutions. Ultimately, IoT is not really about things but rather about data. Mobile-connected objects create scale and various channels for sensor data that flows back and forth. I will listen to how the messaging for front-end, customer-facing and back-end operational activities are emerging among IoT vendors like Nokia, Telstra, GE, Ericsson, and Salesforce but also among firms like ABB and John Deere. I expect AI and machine-learning to play a growing role for big data and IoT initiatives.
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