Planning Your Big Data Strategy: Five Keys To Success

Martha Bennett

To compete in the age of the customer, it’s essential to make the most of the data you have access to, whether it’s from internal or external sources. For most organizations, this implies a need to review and challenge existing approaches to how they capture, process, and use data to support decision-making. But it’s important first of all to move beyond a technology-centric view of big data. This is why at Forrester, we define big data as:

The practices and technologies that close the gap between the data available and the ability to turn that data into business insight.

Moving beyond a technology-centric view doesn’t mean, however, that a bottom-up, technology-led approach to big data strategy won’t work. After all, it’s often the case that business executives can’t see the potential of a technology until they’ve seen it in action. A bottom-up approach also provides the opportunity to acquire technical skills, and gain an understanding of what needs to be done to integrate new technologies with existing systems (even if it’s just at the level of getting the data out – often easier said than done). But a pilot project or proof-of-concept demonstrating the “art of the possible” in a business context is different from implementing a Hadoop cluster and expecting the business side to start asking for projects.

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Watch Out! Networking Professionals Can Be Fired For Buying The Market Leader

Andre Kindness

The recent business articles about customers screaming for change, such as Bloomberg’s recently published article about Goldman Sachs’ CIO threatening Cisco, conjures up images of Dee Snider busting through the wall and screaming, “OH, WE'RE NOT GONNA TAKE IT ANYMORE! WE'VE GOT THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE, AND THERE AIN'T NO WAY WE'LL LOSE IT! THIS IS OUR LIFE.” Connecting customers, employees, and business resources has become a life-or-death element for businesses (see The Enterprise Network Enables Business Innovation).

Am I being overly dramatic? I would like you to name a technology that the entire market openly voiced their displeasure about and forced a market leader to come up with a new strategy like Cisco’s Application Centric Infrastructure. Sure, the market has gone through transitions like the movement from fat access points to controller-based access points and the implementation of server virtualization, but the difference between those transitions and the current one is that these technologies were created before customers demanded them.

Now we have customers defining what they want before the technology exists or even creating their solutions, such as:

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Exploring Costa Rica: Progress And Challenges In Digital Government Transformation

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

Vacations are over – or at least mine is – but I’ve brought home some of mine for homework.  Yes, I did a little work while on vacation. While in Costa Rica this summer, I had the opportunity to meet with the country’s Director of Digital Government, Alicia Avendaño Rivera. 

Governments worldwide recognize the power of “going digital.” The recently announced US Digital Service and the appointment of its dedicated Administrator illustrate a commitment on the part of the US Federal government.  Yet the US is merely joining others who have made similar commitments to transforming government with a focus on efficiency, effectiveness, transparency and empowering citizens and businesses through new digital technologies.  Alicia Avendaño has served as Costa Rica’s Director of Digital Government since 2009.

Costa Rica Digital Government initiatives address four main goals:

  • G2C: Government to Citizen – citizen oriented services
  • G2B Government to Business – rapid and transparent business services
  • G2G: Government to Government – efficient and interconnected services
  • Infrastructure – favorable ICT infrastructure and legal framework
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Top Technologies For Your BT Agenda

Kyle McNabb

Your business executives seek top line growth – 7 out of every 10 we survey state growth is their top priority. Growth requires competitive advantage, but hanging on to yesterday’s competitive advantage will doom your firm. Your technology empowered customers have more power over your brand than ever before. And today’s world of global sourcing and efficient supply chains allows your competition – old and new – to copy or undermine any move you make to compete. Technology has fundamentally changed the competitive landscape.

We believe the only source of competitive advantage is an obsession with understanding and engaging with your customers. Your business leaders across Sales, Customer Service, Marketing, and Product Development now look to technology to help them obsess about your customers. Unfortunately,  the majority of those same business leaders don’t think you and your team can accelerate their success.

You can start changing the dynamics in your organization, and build new competitive advantage, by crafting a business technology agenda. That agenda must focus on what you do with technology, systems, and processes to win, serve, and retain customers. And it starts with putting your customers at the center of your decision making. Once you do, you’ll start to reshape your technology portfolio and prioritize the technologies that help your business obsess about its customers.

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Closing The Experience Gaps Requires New Technology Architecture And Philosophy

John McCarthy

Forrester’s Customer Experience Index (CXi) research reveals a shocking business result: Over five years, CXi leaders outperformed the S&P with 43% stock growth, while CXi laggards had negative returns of -34%. (See this Forrester report to learn about our new customer experience index.)

As a result, firms are in an arms race to mobilize their services, deliver new digital capabilities, and delight customers on every step of their journey. eBusiness, marketing, and customer experience teams are eagerly adopting new software to deliver these digital experiences. At times, they chose a conscious uncoupling from the CIO’s team in order to move quickly and stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

Unfortunately, the mismatch of customer-facing teams scrambling to build new digital services while CIOs and their teams hunker down to cut cost and risk has caused a disconnect on the role of technology management in delivering great experiences. In a new Forrester report, Closing The Experience Gaps, my colleague Ted Schadler and I interviewed more than 35 companies and analyzed survey results from 3,502 US consumers, we uncovered this misalignment and identified the four experience gaps that result (see Figure 1).

Figure 1 Experience Delivery Requires A New Architecture And Philosophy

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Closing The Experience Gaps Requires A New Technology Architecture And Philosophy

Ted Schadler

Forrester’s Customer Experience Index (CXi) research reveals a shocking business result: Over five years, CXi leaders outperformed the S&P with 43% stock growth, while CXi laggards had negative returns of -34%. (See this Forrester report to learn about our new customer experience index.)

As a result, firms are in an arms race to mobilize their services, deliver new digital capabilities, and delight customers on every step of their journey. eBusiness, marketing, and customer experience teams are eagerly adopting new software to deliver these digital experiences. At times, they chose a conscious uncoupling from the CIO’s team in order to move quickly and stay ahead of customers’ expectations.

Unfortunately, the mismatch of customer-facing teams scrambling to build new digital services while CIOs and their teams hunker down to cut cost and risk has caused a disconnect on the role of technology management in delivering great experiences. In a new Forrester report, Closing The Experience Gaps, my colleague John C. McCarthy and I interviewed more than 35 companies and analyzed survey results from 3,502 US consumers, we uncovered this misalignment and identified the four experience gaps that result (see Figure 1).

Figure 1 Experience Delivery Requires A New Architecture And Philosophy

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Analyst Spotlight Podcast With Tyler Shields

Stephanie Balaouras

Introducing The New S&R Monthly Podcast!

The Forrester S&R team has doubled in size during the last several years. Today, we're 17 analysts and researchers across the US, Europe, and India, 19 if you count the research associates that support every project. Given the size of the team and the degree to which analysts have been able to specialize, we decided that we'd take a little time each month to highlight each member of the team in one of our bi-monthly newsletters and in a short podcast. If you're not signed up for our newsletters, I highly encourage you to do so, please email srfl@forrester.com for additional details. In the meantime, click below to listen to our analyst spotlight on Senior Analyst, Tyler Shields.

S&R Podcast Listening Options

Click here to download the MP3 file of this episode. 

Lost In Data Translation? Forrester's Data Taxonomy To The Rescue

Boris Evelson
  • When it comes to data technology, are you lost in translation? What's the difference between data federation, virtualization, and data or information-as-a-service? Are columnar databases also relational? Does one use the same or different tools for BAM (Business Activity Monitoring) and for CEP (Complex Event Processing)? These questions are just the tip of the iceberg of a plethora of terms and definitions in the rich and complex world of enterprise data and information. Enterprise application developers, data, and information architects manage multiple challenges on a daily basis already, and the last thing they need to deal with are misunderstandings of the various data technology component definitions.
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The Future Of Government Is Digital

Nigel Fenwick

Last March, we published The Future Of Business Is Digital and predicted that all businesses must evolve to become digital businesses. Since then, many CIOs in government agencies have asked about the role of digital in government. And yesterday, on The White House Blog, the president made it clear where he stands: The future of government is digital!

In announcing the creation of the US Digital Service, President Obama is reinforcing the need to bring greater agility to federal technology management in service of citizen taxpayers who foot the bill.

"A core part of the President’s Management Agenda is improving the value we deliver to citizens through Federal IT. That’s why, today, the Administration is formally launching the U.S. Digital Service. The Digital Service will be a small team made up of our country’s brightest digital talent that will work with agencies to remove barriers to exceptional service delivery and help remake the digital experience that people and businesses have with their government."

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IBM Doubles Down Cloud IAM And Acquires Lighthouse Gateway

Andras Cser

On the heels of the CrossIdeas acquisition (about which we have recently published a QuickTake), IBM today acquired another IAM cloud provider, Lighthouse Security Group. Its product and service, Lighhouse Gateway, is a small cloud provider that appeared in our Cloud IAM Wave and we were impressed by the "slickness" and ease-of-use of its customer interface for administration (policy management) and also for end users (Lighthouse Gateway provides its own front-end to ISIM and ISAM).

 

Now we recommend that IAM security and risk professionals should ask IBM the following questions about the acquisition:

1) How will IBM offer Lighthouse Gateway? Will it be an add-on to ISIM and ISAM licenses or will it be a standalone offering or both?

2) How will IBM integrate the beautiful user interface of Lighthouse Gateway into ISIM and ISAM on-premises offerings?

3) How will the new IBM IAM access governance ecosystem of ISIM+CrossIdeas be merged with Lighthouse Gateway?