Red Hat Summit – Can you say OpenStack and Containers?

Richard Fichera

In a world where OS and low-level platform software is considered unfashionable, it was refreshing to see the Linux glitterati and cognoscenti descended on Boston for the last three days, 5000 strong and genuinely passionate about Linux. I spent a day there mingling with the crowds in the eshibit halls, attending some sessions and meeting with Red Hat management. Overall, the breadth of Red Hat’s offerings are overwhelming and way too much to comprehend ina single day or a handful of days, but I focused my attention on two big issues for the emerging software-defined data center – containers and the inexorable march of OpenStack.

Containers are all the rage, and Red Hat is firmly behind them, with its currently shipping RHEL Atomic release optimized to support them. The news at the Summit was the release of RHEL Atomic Enterprise, which extends the ability to execute and manage containers over a cluster as opposed to a single system. In conjunction with a tool stack such as Docker and Kubernates, this paves the way for very powerful distributed deployments that take advantage of the failure isolation and performance potential of clusters in the enterprise. While all the IP in RHEL Atomic, Docker and Kubernates are available to the community and competitors, it appears that RH has stolen at least a temporary early lead in bolstering the usability of this increasingly central virtualization abstraction for the next generation data center.

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Rethinking Hybrid Development

John M. Wargo

A few weeks back I published a report entitled New Tools Make Hybrid Apps A Safer Bet. It’s my first report at Forrester, a brief on some of the changes happening in the hybrid application space and what they mean for application development and delivery (AD&D) pros. The topic is something I was noodling on before I joined Forrester and it was a natural topic for my first report.

I’ve been a contributor to the Apache Cordova project and written 4 books on the topic, and while a lot of developers are building hybrid apps using Cordova, broad adoption of the approach has been lacking. Don’t get me wrong, a lot of developers are using the framework, and there are a lot of apps out there, but we haven’t seen a lot of big name adoption. Developers eschew the hybrid approach for reasons both valid and invalid; recent changes in the hybrid space address some of those issues and should set the stage for broader adoption of hybrid. Check out the report and I would love to hear your feedback.

Is ITIL Fit For Purpose For DevOps?

Amy DeMartine

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about ITIL and whether or not it is fit for purpose for DevOps.  The logic I keep hearing goes like this - you shouldn't confuse the ITIL approach with the implementation; the ITIL approach is building blocks; these building blocks are easily applied to DevOps.  I’m not convinced.  First, ITIL is fundamentally time bound.  For example, ITIL v1 was primarily around applying mainframe disciplines into the emerging world of Client/Server, ITIL v2 was more about ensuring quality of output across complex operations environments and ITIL v3 was more about consolidating established operations principles and shifting the focus to “how does IT contribute to business value?”  Isn’t it a stretch to make best practices for previous waves of technology apply to DevOps whereby infrastructure and operations professionals are not silo’d but play an active part in delivering customer products and services along with application developers?  Second, ITIL zealots are convinced that these ITIL “best practices” are some kind of complex baking recipe and if all steps are not followed to the letter, the end result will be a failure.  This means that for many, the approach and the implementation of ITIL is tied.  This leads me to my question:  Is ITIL fit for purpose for DevOps?  To return to the analogy of building blocks, let’s use the ultimate of building blocks – Legos.  When I think about ITIL and service management, what most enterprises have implemented, looks like this:

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Content In The Cloud Is The Next Frontier: IBM And Box Partner To Transform Work

Cheryl McKinnon

Today, IBM and Box announced a partnership and integration strategy to “transform work in the cloud." This is an interesting move that further validates Forrester’s view that the ECM market is transforming — largely due to new, often customer-activated, use cases. We also see that the current horizontal collaboration market is shifting to better target specific work output, as opposed to more general-purpose knowledge-dissemination use cases.


What does this partnership mean for IBM, Box, and their partners and customers?


For Box, the company gets important access to the extensive IBM ecosystem: Global Services, developer communities via IBM’s Bluemix platform, and the IBM-Apple MobileFirst relationship, as well as engineering acceleration to fill gaps in its content collaboration offering in areas such as capture, case management, governance, and analytics, including Watson.

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The State Of The Cyberthreat Intelligence Market

Rick Holland

If the RSA Conference was any indicator, threat intelligence has finally joined the ranks of cloud and advanced persistent threat as ambiguous/overused terms that mean many different things to many different people. If you were given a dollar, pound or euro every time you heard "threat intelligence," there is no doubt you could fund your security budget for decades to come. Your biggest challenge would be determining how to invest some of that money into threat intelligence capabilities.

To help Forrester clients navigate the threat intelligence market I have several pieces of research underway. The first report, "The State Of The Cyberthreat Intelligence Market" has just published. In it I discuss the frenzied venture capital and vendor investment in the threat intelligence space.  I also provide guidance on how security and risk professionals should navigate the marketing hype to make the best investment of their limited resources. I am currently writing the second report "Market Overview: Threat Intelligence Providers." Here is a snippet from the latest research that illustrates just how much vendor focus we have seen. Since October of 2014:


  • There have been three acquisitions and eight fundraising rounds.
  • iSight Partners (Critical Intelligence) and Lookingglass (Cloudshield) have each raised funds and made an acquisition.
  • Of the acquisitions, only one company publicly disclosed the acquisition amount: $40 million (Proofpoint.)
  • The eight fundraising rounds raised a total of $102.5 million dollars.
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Houston, We Have A Problem . . . In The Networking Community

Andre Kindness

I noticed an interesting phenomenon at Interop, which sparked my theory on new network technologies. New network technology maturity and its adoption correlate directly to the five stages of loss: 1) denial; 2) anger; 3) bargaining; 4) depression; and 5) acceptance. For example, Interop break-out sessions on cloud and bring your own device (BYOD) now mostly seemed to be mainstream initiatives compared to other technologies, such as software defined network or network functions virtualized. In the mainstream initiative sessions, an aura of acceptance and even tinges of optimism reverberated throughout the room. Presenters spoke passionately and positively about their topics and reinforced the importance of: 

  • Teamwork. Courtney Kissler, Vice President of E-Commerce & Store Technologies at Nordstrom, shared with the audience that the new world is made up of a team of business product managers and mobile app and networking professionals, to name just a few groups working together under the initiative. There was the mentality that everyone is accountable and must work together as a team, helping each other to roll out a great application that will benefit the business.
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Forrester's Security & Risk Research Spotlight -- Don't Let Cloud Go Over Your Head

Stephanie Balaouras

With great convenience comes great responsibility...

Once a month I use my blog to highlight some of S&R’s latest and greatest. The cloud is attractive for many reasons -- the possibility of working from home, the vast array of performance and analytical capabilities available, knowing that your backups are safe from that fateful coffee spill, etc. Although the cloud is not a new concept, the security essentials behind it unfortunately remain a mystery to practically all users. What’s worse, the security professionals tasked with protecting corporate data rarely have visibility into all the risk -- it’s simply too easy for users to make critical cloud decisions without process or oversight.   

Underestimating or neglecting the necessary security practices that a cloud requires can lead to hacks, breaches, and horrendous data leaks. We’ve seen our fair share of security embarrassments that range from Hollywood execs to the US government, and S&R pros know that these are far from done.

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The Technology Skills Needed To Deliver In A Customer-Obsessed Organization

Sharyn Leaver

Digital technologies have shifted control into the hands of your customers. Your customers are now independent, active agents in everything, from selecting the channels and platforms they prefer, to the very definition of your brands. As CIO, you’re in an enviable position and are more essential to your firm’s success than ever. You have the technology know-how to tap into these digital technologies. And together with your CMO, you can lead your firm to become customer obsessed and create the digital experiences that win, serve, and retain customers. But you have to be willing to change the way you work.

CIOs of customer obsessed firms must embrace an accelerated pace of change and reinvention, for themselves and their organizations. But years of radical IT outsourcing have denuded many technology management organizations. In fact, Forrester's Q1 2015 Digital Experience Delivery Survey found that the top barrier to success was a lack of resources. So your first order of business as CIO?  Invest heavily in new skills:

  • Software engineering.Software (and how well it does or doesn’t perform) underpins the brand for digital businesses, making core software development and delivery skills paramount to your firm’s future success.  Agile methods, continuous-delivery techniques, and product management skills will be critical – not just in pockets, but scaled up to address all software engineering needs.
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John M. Wargo

As a recent addition to the Forrester Application Development and Delivery (AD&D) team, I thought I’d use my first post here to introduce myself.

I’ve been a professional software developer, in one capacity or another, for the entirety of my professional career. Like many others on this team, I’m a geek (not a nerd; yes, there is a difference) and very interested in anything related to software development, gadgets and especially mobile.

As part of the AD&D team, I’ll be focusing on Mobile development topics alongside my colleagues Jeffrey Hammond and Michael Facemire. Because of my experience with open source software, described below, I will be focusing some of my efforts on that space as well. Currently I’m working on updating some of the existing reports in the Mobile App Dev Playbook, the first of which will be published soon.

Before coming to Forrester, I was a product manager at SAP responsible for part of the SAP Mobile Platform (SMP) SDK. I owned the SMP Hybrid SDK (called Kapsel) and the SAP Fiori Client, a native mobile runtime for SAP Fiori. In the last ten years, I’ve held positions at BlackBerry, BoxTone (now part of Good Technology) and AT&T. While at AT&T, I focused primarily on mobile application platforms, achieving developer certification for several products in this space.

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A Travel Nightmare: How To Ignore Data, Remain Clueless, And Anger Your Customers

Brian  Hopkins

Firms are blowing opportunities to engender their customers’ lifelong loyalty. Here’s an example from my own recent experience:

As an analyst, I fly 100,000-plus miles with a preferred airline every year, and I’m a mobile mind-shifted consumer; therefore, I have made some assumptions that have led to an expectation. Assumption — weather delays are not a new phenomenon in travel; assumption — the technology to analyze data and communicate with passengers has been around for a while now, and my big airline that is bleeding money out of its ears should have invested in it; expectation — my airline is going to use my mobile device to understand and take care of me because I’m important to them.

Here’s a summary of how that turned out not to be the case and how my airline could have used systems of insight to handle a bad situation and secure my lifetime loyalty:

Data they had access to: Weather projections over Chicago.

  • Insight they should have had: My aircraft had a high probability of flying right into a bad system.
  • Action they could have taken: They could have rebooked me before I got on the plane.
  • What actually happened: I was stranded in Chicago when a tornado touched down at about the same time I did.
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