Samsung Commits To The Business Segment At CeBIT 2015 With IoT Solutions

Dan Bieler

Samsung launched its business offerings at CeBIT 2015. Samsung Business is a new brand and combines Samsung’s Knox for security and enterprise mobility management, Smart Signage, and printing. Samsung Business offers industry-specific solutions for retail, education, hospitality, transportation, healthcare, and financial services.

In retail, Samsung offers digital mirror and video wall devices. School Solution integrates its mobile devices with interactive learning tools. Its Smart Hotel Solution offers premium in-room experience and information bulletin touchscreens. The Preventive Mobile Cardiac Rehabilitation solution enables real-time monitoring of chronic conditions. For financial services, Samsung provides secure document handling and printing services. And its transportation solution provides real-time information and analysis of data. My main takeaways:

  • Samsung Business is a good first step toward catering to businesses. Samsung has enormous potential to leverage its existing consumer device expertise and experiences, especially in the B2B2C space. Samsung is right to opt for an open and collaborative Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem to overcome the challenges of platform compatibility, data analysis, and security. Samsung has a long track record in focusing on user experience. This should help it deliver high-quality and intuitive-to-use business solutions.
  • Samsung’s sector solutions are still rather basic. At this stage, Samsung is right to focus on a handful of offerings that it is familiar with and can deliver with high quality. However, Samsung will need to drill down deeper into business processes and business models to become successful in the emerging world of IoT longer term.
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Beyond Show-Me-The-Money: Tech Jobs Require More Than Tax Incentives

Jennifer Belissent, Ph.D.

 

A Mission of MercyEconomic development means different things to different people. It depends on their context.  In my early work as a Peace Corps volunteer in Africa development meant bringing running water to villages.  My town was the new recipient of a public water system from the Danish Aid Agency.

But broadly speaking, economic development initiatives are efforts to attract investment to a region.  For most places, it’s not about running water but about creating jobs.  And, some of the best jobs out there – in demand and high paying – are in technology or in software development more specifically.  Software is the future.  And, many cities, states and countries want to get in on the act.  Yes, many of the software development jobs will go to product development shops but they need to hire from somewhere and government leadersare hoping to bring those jobs to their constituents.

A classic strategy for attracting investment to a region is to provide tax incentives.   We’ll give you a break on your corporate taxes for a period of time if you bring your new headquarters or factory or research facility to our region.  A quick search reveals many such programs. Apparently Texas is “wide open for business” and is willing to provide tax abatements and local incentives. 

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How Data Can Enable Business Disruption: Traditional Retailers Must Take Note Of The Sharing Economy

Dan Bieler

Recently, I talked with the CEO and founder of reBuy about the shifting dynamics in the retail sector as a result of digitalization. The use of data has evolved to the point where data has become the enterprise’s most critical business asset in the age of the customer. The business model of reBuy reCommerce — the leading German marketplace for secondhand goods — can help CIOs understand how the intelligent use of data can significantly disrupt a market such as retail.

The case of reBuy offers interesting insights into how the wider trends of the sharing and collaborative economy affect retail. If you can buy a good-quality used product with a guarantee for half the price, many people will not buy the product new. Many consumers increasingly accept product reuse and see it as an opportunity to obtain cheaper products and reduce their environmental footprint by avoiding the production of items that wouldn’t be used efficiently. The reBuy case study highlights that:

  • Business technology is taking the sharing economy into new realms. The reBuy business model demonstrates that consumers are starting to push the ideas of the sharing economy deep into the retail space. CIOs in all industries must prepare for the implications that this will have for their businesses.
  • Standalone products are at particular risk of sharing dynamics. The example of reBuy shows that businesses that sell plain products will come under even more pressure from shifting shopping behavior, where people are increasingly satisfied with buying used goods. These businesses need to add value to those products that are not available for secondhand purchase.
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Digital Experience Personalization Is Hollow Without Predictive

Rowan Curran

There’s no other way to slice it: competition for digital audiences is brutal. Intolerance for poor performance and disengaging experiences drives customers to competitor’s sites more quickly and more permanently than any time in history. Users increasingly demand digital experiences that personalize to their immediate needs and adapt to the current context, not treat them as a market or demographic segment.

In recently published research, we found that even as expectations soar, enterprises are personalizing with methods that are too unsophisticated, too opaque, or too convoluted to meet the complexity and mutability needed to serve individuals.  Persona-based segmentation is too simplistic to meet current, much less future, customer expectations. Some solutions provide predictive analytics capabilities but are limited to a few algorithms or black-box methods (e.g. neural networks) are not easily adaptable to new data or scenarios. Those that rely heavily on rules have become morasses, some customers needing to manage and maintain hundreds or thousands of rules to guide digital experiences.

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Facebook and HP Show Different Visions for Web-scale

Richard Fichera

Recently we’ve had a chance to look again at two very conflicting views from HP and Facebook on how to do web-scale and cloud computing, both announced at the recent OCP annual event in California.

From HP come its new CloudLine systems, the public face of their joint venture with Foxcon. Early details released by HP show a line of cost-optimized servers descended from a conventional engineering lineage and incorporating selected bits of OCP technology to reduce costs. These are minimalist rack servers designed, after stripping away all the announcement verbiage, to compete with white-box vendors such as Quanta, SuperMicro and a host of others. Available in five models ranging from the minimally-featured CL1100 up through larger nodes designed for high I/O, big data and compute-intensive workloads, these systems will allow large installations to install capacity at costs ranging from 10 – 25% less than the equivalent capacity in their standard ProLiant product line. While the strategic implications of HP having to share IP and market presence with Foxcon are still unclear, it is a measure of HP’s adaptability that they were willing to execute on this arrangement to protect against inroads from emerging competition in the most rapidly growing segment of the server market, and one where they have probably been under immense margin pressure.

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Meet Our Speakers For Forrester's China Summit For Marketing Leaders: March 25 In Shanghai!

Bryan Wang

Disruption is increasingly commonplace for businesses today facing data breaches, innovative startups, or simply, more technology-empowered customers. The agenda for our third annual Summit for Marketing Leaders in Shanghai on March 25, 2015 therefore, is geared towards helping traditional enterprises better prepared for the age of the customer.  

Besides industry keynote speakers who will share their real world experiences, we have brought together a stellar lineup of Forrester analysts who will present an arsenal of frameworks, methodologies, tools and case studies to help organizations better connect, engage and deliver in the digital world. Based on decades of experience, hundreds of globally relevant research reports, Forrester analysts will share with you what works and what doesn’t in an era of digital disruption and transformation:

  • Navigate Digital Disruption, by Dane Anderson, Vice President, Research Director & Region Manager for Asia Pacific
  • Build An Ecosystem To Win In Your Customers' Mobile Moments, by Julie A. Ask, Vice President, Principal Analyst
  • Path To A Digital Business: Build An Architecture That Supports Your Customer-Centric Strategy, a panel discussion moderated by Charlie Dai, Principal Analyst
  • Build Contextual Marketing Engine To Propel Customers To Next Best Interaction, by Gene Cao, Senior Analyst
  • Select The Right Agency In The Digital Era, by Xiaofeng Wang, Senior Analyst
  • How To Build A Customer Experience Strategy, by Ryan Hart, Principal Analyst
  • Getting The Most Out Of Social Media, by Clement Teo, Senior Analyst
  • Why Measure Customer Experience, by Vikram Sehgal, VP, Research Director, Data
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Get Input From The Right Stakeholders When Creating A Business Case For CRM

Kate Leggett

This year, organizations across industries show strong interest in revamping the technologies that they use to engage with customers. Our recent data indicates that over half of enterprise organizations have already implemented a CRM solution — and a high percentage are investing more to upgrade and expand their tool sets in the next few years. But even in this improving economy, senior business leaders are closely scrutinizing the ROI they expect from overhauling customer-facing processes and supporting technologies.

You need to build a business case correctly or risk launching CRM initiatives with a low chance of delivering clear business results. Almost as bad, poor communication of anticipated payback can prevent you from gaining funding for projects that would provide strong benefits.

So, what does a solid business case do for you?

  • It speeds up the project approval process. Clear communication leads to fewer passes through the funding process as everyone understands the goals and benefits of the project.
  • It increases  project success. When everyone knows the reasons, goals, and bounds of an initiative, project success improves. The business case serves as the North Star that keeps the project focused on key business goals and outcomes which are measurable and quantifiable.
  • It takes (some) emotion out of decisions. Decisions that involve a choice among competing platforms of large and powerful technology vendors often turn into emotionally charged battles between opposing camps within the organization. Moving the discussion to one of metrics and numbers minimizes the emotion and returns some level of objectivity back into the process.
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Cloud Implementations: The Default Choice For CIOs In Healthcare

Skip Snow

Up to a couple of years ago, healthcare technology executives advocating the use of managed services, cloud, and other off-premises uses of data were mavericks. Management told us that cloud presented too much risk. One leading doctor in a prestigious institution said to me, “I would rather see my institution’s name on the front page of the New York Times because of a data breach on premise. Seeing adverse publicity because we released our data to the cloud and a bad thing happened will destroy our reputation.” Management insisted that we keep the data under the control of our institutions by keeping it in a data center. In the age of health information exchange and value-based medicine, the rising cost of that infrastructure paradigm is no longer feasible. Today we hear healthcare CIOs telling us that the preference for solutions is cloud first, and on-premises solutions must be justified: Cloud-based solutions are becoming the default choice.

This seismic shift is due to several factors: 

  • Building and operating data centers is complex, expensive, and resource-intensive.
  • The network is fast and strong.
  • The removal of capital costs of hardware and infrastructure from budgets releases a great deal of capital for other more pressing needs.
  • The enactment of the HIPAA Omnibus rule, finalized in January 2013 and effective as of September of the same year, forces the vendor community to accept the responsibility for PHI and thus changed the paradigm around the feeling of regulatory protection granted to healthcare organizations when contemplating a "loss of control" of their data that was feared as they anticipated moving functions and capabilities to the cloud (http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/administrative/omnibus/).
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Intel Announces Xeon SOC – Seriously Raising the Bar for AMD and ARM Competition

Richard Fichera

Intel has made no secret of its development of the Xeon D, an SOC product designed to take Xeon processing close to power levels and product niches currently occupied by its lower-power and lower performance Atom line, and where emerging competition from ARM is more viable.

The new Xeon D-1500 is clear evidence that Intel “gets it” as far as platforms for hyperscale computing and other throughput per Watt and density-sensitive workloads, both in the enterprise and in the cloud are concerned. The D1500 breaks new ground in several areas:

It is the first Xeon SOC, combining 4 or 8 Xeon cores with embedded I/O including SATA, PCIe and multiple 10 nd 1 Gb Ethernet ports.

(Source: Intel)

It is the first of Intel’s 14 nm server chips expected to be introduced this year. This expected process shrink will also deliver a further performance and performance per Watt across the entire line of entry through mid-range server parts this year.

Why is this significant?

With the D-1500, Intel effectively draws a very deep line in the sand for emerging ARM technology as well as for AMD. The D1500, with 20W – 45W power, delivers the lower end of Xeon performance at power and density levels previously associated with Atom, and close enough to what is expected from the newer generation of higher performance ARM chips to once again call into question the viability of ARM on a pure performance and efficiency basis. While ARM implementations with embedded accelerators such as DSPs may still be attractive in selected workloads, the availability of a mainstream x86 option at these power levels may blunt the pace of ARM design wins both for general-purpose servers as well as embedded designs, notably for storage systems.

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Adobe Tops The Technology Partner Podium

Anjali Yakkundi

Service providers are vital to the success and failure of digital experience delivery initiatives. In fact, one enterprise told me their services partner was “the saving grace” of their initiative. But only if they implement the right technology products.

My colleagues Ted Schadler, Peter Sheldon, and I asked about the technology vendor partner programs of 46 digital experience service providers from a variety of DNAs including technology services, consultancies, global digital agencies, and specialist firms. We asked for their top three technology partners in six different digital experience technology categories, including WCM, eCommerce, digital asset management, analytics, and campaign management. What did we discover? The results surprised us so we wanted to share them with you:

  • Adobe was a runaway winner across a broader digital experience delivery portfolio. Adobe had more than twice as many partnerships as any other technology vendor across the six product categories. Adobe earned this distinction with partnerships in four categories: WCM, digital asset management, campaign management, and customer analytics.
  • In WCM, Sitecore and Adobe reigned, while in eCommerce hybris, IBM, and Oracle lead. Adobe, Sitecore, Drupal, Microsoft, and Acquia lead in WCM partnerships: many serviceevangelize and support these solutions. When it comes to eCommerce, however, a different set of solutions topped the list: SAP hybris, IBM, Oracle, and Demandware. Interestingly, many services firms make a living out of integrating these best-of-breed WCM solutions with these best-of-breed commerce solutions for web and mobile redesigns.
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