Announcing Our Annual Benchmark On The State Of US Consumers And Technology In 2016

In 2016, consumers of all ages are extremely connected — the average US online adult uses more than four connected devices, three-quarters use a smartphone and more than half use a tablet. Forrester’s annual report on the State of Consumers and Technology: Benchmark 2016, US reveals the most important consumer technology trends that marketers need to know. This data-rich report is a graphical analysis of a range of topics about consumers and technology and serves as a benchmark for US consumers’ level of technology adoption, usage, and attitudes. Our annual benchmark report is based on Forrester's Technographics® online benchmark survey that we've been fielding since 1998. We analyze our findings through a generational lens, including Gen Z, Gen Y, Gen X, Younger Boomers, Older Boomers, and the Golden Generation.

What did we find this year? All generations use more devices this year than a year ago, but which devices they use depends heavily on age. For example, 84% of Gen Zers (ages 18-27) use a smartphone and laptop, but only 44% use a desktop computer and 49% use a tablet. Their older Millennial counterparts, Gen Yers (ages 28 -36), have higher incomes and in addition to using smartphones and tablets, two-thirds use a tablet. In contrast, three-quarters of the Golden Generation (ages 72+) uses a desktop computer, and only a third use a smartphone. 

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The Data Digest: Forrester's Social Technographics 2016

To build a successful social media program you need to understand your audience’s social media behaviors and preferences. We just released our 2016 results for Forrester's Social Technographics model, and it does just that. It shows how important social should be in your marketing plans based on how important social tools are in your customers’ life cycle. We group consumers into four groups: Social Skippers, Snackers, Savvies and Stars—the Skippers spurn commercial social interactions and the Stars demand it.

What did we find this year? In 2016, the average US online adult receives an overall score of 40 and fits into our Social Savvies category. Social Savvies consider social tools a part of their everyday lives. On average, US online adults score highly for explore and discover— they use social tools to discover new products and also to explore them when they’re considering their purchases. Compared to last year, US consumers are slightly more social media savvy in 2016: The Social Technographics Score for the average US online adult has increased from 37 in 2015 to 40 in 2016. 

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Data Digest: Announcing Our Annual Benchmark On The State Of US Consumers And Technology In 2015

In 2015, consumers of all ages are extremely connected — the average US online adult uses more than four connected devices, and 70% use a smartphone. Marketers today want to know who the early adopters are, how far behind the laggards are, and what types of technologies they need to incorporate into their marketing and customer interaction mix.

Our annual report on The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2015, US answers these questions. This data-rich report is a graphical analysis of a range of topics about consumers and technology and serves as a benchmark for US consumers’ level of technology adoption, usage, and attitudes. Our annual benchmark report is based on Forrester's Technographics® online benchmark survey that we've been fielding since 1998.

Because of sharp differences in technology adoption by age, we analyze our findings through a generational lens, including Gen Z, Gen Y, Gen X, Younger Boomers, Older Boomers, and the Golden Generation. So what did we find this year? Not surprisingly, younger generations lead in technology uptake, with Gen Yers leading the way — showing the highest uptake of Internet-connected TVs, smartphones, and tablets. Older generations lag behind, but even members of the Golden Generation use more than three connected devices, on average.

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The Data Digest: Forrester’s Next-Generation CX Index Reveals Why Customer Experience Is Important For Telecom Companies

Having lived in a number of cities throughout the years, I have faced the typical problems of the cable customer — a limited number of providers and little ability to switch. And over and over again, I’ve been frustrated and disappointed by the customer experience (CX) I’ve received from these cable companies. I’m not alone: Forrester’s next-generation CX Index™ benchmarks TV and Internet service providers (ISPs) as among the lowest for CX quality. But as many new TV models start to emerge, consumers will be able to punish poor providers and switch more easily to new companies that meet their needs.

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Announcing Our Annual Benchmark On The State Of US Consumers And Technology In 2014

As the importance of technology to consumers continues to grow, pretty much anyone working for a company that wants to improve their customer experience needs to understand consumers’ technology behaviors. Questions companies ask include: “How did US consumers’ technology use change in 2014?” “Who are the early adopters of wearable devices?” “Are older adults using digital media?” “Are Millennials really ready to cut the cord?” These are just a few of the questions we answer in our newly released report on The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2014, US. This data-rich report is a graphical analysis of a range of topics about consumers and technology and serves as a benchmark for consumers’ level of technology adoption, usage, and attitudes. Our annual benchmark report is based on Forrester's Consumer Technographics® online benchmark surveythat we've been fielding since 1998.

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My Highlights from EmTech MIT hosted by MIT Technology Review 2014

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of attending EmTech MIT hosted by MIT Technology Review. It was inspiring, exciting and motivating to see the innovators of today give us a glimpse of the emerging technologies that will influence the future. The event was especially fascinating for me because as a consumer insights analyst at Forrester Research, I closely follow consumer technology adoption. At the event, Astro Teller, Captain of Moonshots at Google[x], discussed how the technology giant approaches tackling society’s greatest challenges: The initiative needs to address an enormous problem that can be named, the solution needs to be radical, and is based on science and technology. Working on emerging technologies like the self-driving car, Google Glass, and smart contact lenses, Google[x] is at the forefront of bringing futuristic technologies to market.

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The Data Digest: Introducing Forrester’s Consumer Healthcare Segmentation

The age of the customer coupled with the onset of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. "Obamacare") means that many new customers will enter the US health insurance market. One outcome of the legislation is an opportunity for health insurance marketers to acquire new customers and engage existing customers — and Forrester wants to help them seize this moment. As such, we have created a consumer healthcare segmentation to identify unique groups of US consumers as well as their healthcare needs and attitudes to help health insurance marketers target new customers, engage existing customers, and innovate exciting healthcare tools and programs.

Our report, “Introducing Forrester’s Consumer Healthcare Segmentation,” explains each segment and how to attract or engage them. The segmentation includes both insured and uninsured consumers, representing the entire US online adult population. The graphic below shows each of the segments and their relative size.

Some highlights from the report, which is based on a survey of more than 4,500 US online consumers:

  • Fitness Trackers are young and love to use wearable devices; in fact, everyone in this segment uses one. The majority agree that that their health and wellness are priorities for them and they try to eat a healthy diet, but close to half believe that they are so healthy that they don’t need health insurance.
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Forrester Releases The Annual State of Consumers And Technology 2013, US Report

We just published our annual report on The State Of Consumers And Technology: Benchmark 2013, US. This data-rich report is a graphical analysis of a range of topics about consumers and technology and serves as a benchmark for consumers’ level of technology adoption, usage and attitudes. Our annual benchmark report is based on Forrester's Technographics® online benchmark survey that we've been fielding since 1998. The report covers a wide range of topics, such as online activities, social media activities, retail behaviors and preferences, and device usage—for  ‘traditional’ technologies like TVs and laptops—as well as more emerging technologies like smartphones, tablets and wearables.

We analyze our findings through a generational lens, including Gen Z, Gen Y, Gen X, Younger Boomers, Older Boomers, and the Golden Generation. While most Americans are already online, we are seeing major strides in mobile Internet access. In 2013, all generations are connected—81% of the US adult population goes online. But there are still generational differences in smartphone usage: Seven of ten Gen Zers and Gen Yers use a smartphone, but only 18% of the Golden Generation do.

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The “Facebook Factor”—What You Need to Know About Youth Social Media Marketing

It's been more than a year since Forrester published its original Facebook factor report, which quantified the impact of a Facebook fan on brand interactions for US online adults, and social media has only become a bigger part of consumers’ online experience. Social media is engrained in the lives of US consumers, and we found this to also be true for US youth. Our latest report, “The Facebook Factor: US Online Youth” answers the question, “How much more likely are youth Facebook fans to purchase, consider, and recommend brands than non-fans?” We also analyzed youth engagement with brands on other social networking sites like Twitter and Google+. As in the original report, we used logistic regression modeling to uncover the effect of Facebook fans or Twitter followers on brands for the youth market.

In the report, we analyzed the “Facebook factor” for four brands that are popular with youth: Converse, Disney, iTunes, and Starbucks. We found that US online youth who engage with these brands on social media are much more likely to have made a purchase from, consider, and recommend each of these brands than non-engagers.

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Highlights From The Insight Innovation Exchange Conference

 

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending the Insight Innovation Exchange conference in Philadelphia. There were many vendors that offered solutions to many common challenges that market researchers face. One common theme I noticed was the challenge for market researchers to make sense of big data. Yes, big data has become something of a buzzword, but consumers are creating a lot more data and market researchers can thrive if they embrace it.

For some time now, Forrester has been writing about the importance of incorporating behavioral tracking insights to marketer researchers’ research mix. Don’t get me wrong — survey research is and will continue to be incredibly important for companies to gain insights on consumers. A survey can capture a variety of consumer behaviors, sentiments, and attitudes. In one survey, marketers can assess their market share and find out the profile of their customers and what they want. And survey research can help provide insight into the “why” — the reasoning behind the choices that consumers make — something that is not possible with behavioral data. However, survey research cannot detail granular activities due to respondent recall. Enter big data, and with it many possibilities for behavioral tracking. Yes, this is nothing new for customer intelligence professionals, who analyze customer transactions, online web tracking, and other consumer behaviors. But by combining survey and behavioral data, marketers get the best of both worlds: They get consumer profiles and psychographics, brand health metrics, and a detailed record of the actions that those consumers actually do.

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