Survey is Open - Call for Participation - 2014 ECM and Archiving Trends

Cheryl McKinnon

Forrester's 2014 online survey for Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Content Archiving is open! Take this opportunity to provide your perspectives on the vendors, the challenges, and the opportunities you are see in these technology markets.

Why is your input important? Forrester uses this data to:

  • Keep our Content Management Playbook fresh and relevant. Clients who are embarking on a new or updated content initiative rely on these interconnected reports to understand the landscape, market direction and build out the business cases, continuous improvement techniques and org charts to succeed.
  • Track the trends and emerging use cases for ECM and archiving. We see growth-oriented enterprises using both data and content to support customer acquisition and retentention strategies, innovation programs and develop operational excellence. How are these new requirements being met?
  • Educate clients and non-clients alike via research, blog posts, webinars and industry presentations. This survey data helps us validate and verify where ECM and archiving markets are evolving, and help you make better investment decisions.

Please take this survey if you are a practitioner inside private or public sector, and make or influence decisions around ECM and/or archiving platforms. Survey participants will be provided with the survey results summary slide deck, if desired.

Vendors and consultants - we encourage you to circulate this survey to your clients and prospects!

Forrester thanks you for your participation!  Link: https://forrester.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3TS5F96nDBMaH0V

Business Agility Starts With Your People: Keynote At Forrester London Forum

Craig Le Clair

The ability to sense and execute on change are essential qualities of a digital business in today’s marketplace.

Don’t believe me? Consider this: 70% of the companies that were on the Global 500 list a mere 10 years ago have now vanished – unable to adapt. In those 10 years we’ve seen digital disruption change the business landscape. We’ve watched the Internet become pervasive, embraced cloud-based applications that update multiple times a year, acquired mobile devices that connect everywhere in the neighborhood and around the globe, and embraced information workers who use their own tools to do corporate work on their own time.

We recently surveyed 300 global businesses to dig deeply into how prepared – in the sense of being agile – they are for types of events and business changes that the new digital age will bring. And, our findings were not surprising. High performing organizations are flattening to deal with rapid change. They are using knowledge creation and dissemination to drive decisions lower in the organization, and redefining  the role of the CEO. Organizational agility, characterized by high awareness and execution in knowledge dissemination, change management and digital psychology agility dimensions, drives significant performance for enterprises.  

My keynote session at our Forum for Technology Management Leaders in London (June 12-13) on the topic will highlight organizations that have made market, organizational, and process changes based on digital strategies to become more agile, more productive, and grow revenues. I hope to see you there.

How Will The Data Economy Impact Enterprise Architects?

Gene Leganza
No self-respecting EA professional would enter into planning discussions with business or tech management execs without a solid grasp of the technologies available to the enterprise, right? But what about the data available to the enterprise? Given the shift towards data-driven decision-making and the clear advantages from advanced analytics capabilities, architecture professionals should be coming to the planning table with not only an understanding of enterprise data, but a working knowledge of the available third-party data that could have significant impact on your approach to customer engagement or your B2B partner strategy.
 
 
Data discussions can't be simply about internal information flow, master data, and business glossaries any more. Enterprise architects, business architects, and information architects working with business execs on tech-enabled strategies need to bring third-party data know-how to their brainstorming and planning discussions. As the data economy is still in its relatively early stages and, more to the point, as organizational responsibilities for sourcing, managing, and governing third-party data are still in their formative states, it behooves architects to take the lead in understanding the data economy in some detail. By doing so, architects can help their organizations find innovative approaches to data and analytics that have direct business impact by improving the customer experience, making your partner ecosystem more effective, or finding new revenue from data-driven products.
 
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Lexmark To Buy Readsoft - Consolidation Continues In Capture And Content Management Market

Craig Le Clair

Lexmark’s acquisition of Readsoft is part of a continued effort at Lexmark to balance mature and stable printer HW revenues with faster  growing software and services businesses.  This acquisition is one of many in the last two years, and is consistent with consolidation in the mature capture and content market.  And it works for me.

Readsoft provides more software depth in Europe then Lexmark has, and is stronger than Lexmark in financial process automation (purchase –to-pay and order-to cash although mostly the former) with strong integration with SAP and other ERP vendors. Perceptive Software, the core technology within  Lexmark’s software division, is  more content then transaction oriented, a strength that  Readsoft adds.  

There is also synergy across analytics.  For example, Brainware, acquired by Lexmark, is very strong in analytics for forms processing – one of these being invoices.  This should add smarts to ReadSofts front end. 

As always, success is determined by how integration talks place over time and whether an integrated platform can emerge with minimal customer disruption.  It would be good to see acquisiions in the services area to more quickly balance revenue with the tradition business. 

Federal Government Releases Health Care Provider Reference Architecture

Skip Snow

On April 3rd 2014, the federal mandate to publish an IT Risk framework for Healthcare IT was fulfilled with the publication of the "FDASIA Health IT Report: Proposed Strategy and Recommendations for a Risk Based Framework."

As per the FDA press release "the diverse and rapidly developing industry of health information technology requires a thoughtful, flexible approach,” said HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. “This proposed strategy is designed to promote innovation and provide technology to consumers and health care providers while maintaining patient safety. Innovative health IT products present tremendous potential benefits, including: greater prevention of medical errors; reductions in unnecessary tests; increased patient engagement; and faster identifications of and response to public health threats and emergencies. However, if health IT products are not designed, implemented or maintained properly, they can pose varying degrees of risk to the patients who use them. The safety of health IT relies not only on how a product is designed and developed, but on how it is customized, implemented, integrated and used" 

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Microsoft Leads The China Cloud War Into Episode II

Charlie Dai

Microsoft is officially launching the commercial operations of its cloud offerings in China today. It’s been only nine months since Steve Ballmer, the former CEO of Microsoft, made the announcement in Shanghai that Windows Azure — now renamed Microsoft Azure — would be available for preview in the Chinese market.

I call that Episode I of the China Cloud War. In the report that I published at the time, “PaaS Market Dynamics in China, 2012 To 2017”, I made three predictions — predictions that are now being fulfilled. More global players are joining the war; customers have gotten familiar with cloud concepts and are planning hybrid cloud implementations for their businesses; and traditional IT service providers have started to transform themselves into cloud service providers.

I talked with Microsoft and Citrix last week, and I strongly believe that Episode I has ended and Episode II has just begun. In the battle for partner ecosystems and real customer business, here are the three major plots that enterprise architects and CIOs in China should watch unfold:

  • The thrree kingdoms will fight with the gloves off. In my blog post last year, I described three kingdoms of global vendors in Chinese cloud market: Microsoft, Amazon, and vendors behind open source technology like OpenStack and CloudStack.
    •  Microsoft is leading the market as the first company in China to provide unified solutions for public cloud, private cloud, and hybrid cloud across infrastructure (IaaS) and middleware (PaaS). This builds on its deep understanding of enterprise requirements, its massive developer base, and the ease of use on the Windows platform.
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Engagement is the theme for Enterprise Architecture today

Alex Cullen

I’m seeing many signs of an evolving role and recognition for enterprise architecture.  This is changing how we ourselves see the practice of EA.

For example, one of the more frequent inquiries I get from EA leaders is around customer experience and the customer lifecycle - where our clients want to know how EA should help translate business customer experience goals into architecture.  Our inquiries around mobile are less around the technology and more around shaping an enterprise digital strategy.  The questions we get around Big Data have shifted from technology towards how gain better insights on a company’s markets.  

‘Engagement’ is the underlying theme of this evolution.  Companies need to build Systems of Engagement - and EAs are at the front-lines of decisions.  But also, EAs are stepping  up their engagement with their business leaders to provide the value their busness needs. 

If you also see this evolution, and are successfully addressing engagement of either form in your EA program, I’d like to invite you to submit your story for the 2014 Enterprise Architecture Award, sponsored by Forrester Research, InfoWorld and Penn State University’s Center for Enterprise Architecture.

As with previous years, we are recognizing leading EA programs, not a specific project.  We’d like to hear from programs that:

  • Have re-shaped how their business plans and governs business technology strategy
  • Have  helped their organization move from ‘mobile as a project’ to ‘mobile as an enterprise strategy’
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Is All Work Becoming Knowledge Work?

Craig Le Clair

 

It hit me the other day when I was speaking with a call center operator about my reservation. She was funny, smart, well informed and flew around her app. with the quickness of the chipmunk. She is the new breed of worker. Not the production worker that performs repetitive tasks, like data entry and responding to the same dumb information requests, anxious to get you off the phone to meet a call duration metric. No, our relentless offshoring, automation, and customer self-service is slowly eliminating this type of worker.

We hear numbers like this consistently, and this from a Workforce Planning  VP at a major Major Telecommunications company,

“Today  70% of our inquiries are handled by self service (IVR, Web, or mobile) with only 30% that ever get to our call center.  But these calls that get through are really hard. The customer has researched the problem on line and is ready to have a deep conversation. So unfortunately, even though the call volumes are way down, the number of agents we need has not decreased due to how complex these calls are. "

What does this mean for enterprises? High performance will be achieved supporting these workers with advanced information management and solutions like Dynamic Case Management that give them freedom to make decisions and advance the customer experience.  

We will shortly publish a wave on DCM. Look for some new European solutions like BeInformed (Netherlands), Whitestein (Germany), and ISIS (Austria) to gain ground on  PegaSystems, IBM, EMC, Appian  and others from the traditional BPM market.

The War Of Mission-Critical Applications In The Cloud Is Getting Hot In China

Charlie Dai

The entire cloud ecosystem in China is undergoing significant change. End users are getting more serious about adopting cloud solutions and ISVs are working with telecom carriers and partners to deliver mission-critical business applications in the cloud. My latest report, “Brief: Major Players Are Targeting The Chinese Cloud Market For Core Business Apps,” summarizes the overall trends of cloud adoption in China, looks at each vendor’s solution, and provides high-level suggestions. Specifically, I discuss:

  • General trends in SaaS adoption in China. Timing is very critical for market penetration. The survey results I share in this report show a dramatic increase in decision-maker interest in cloud-based offerings. This is probably the last chance for companies that want significant market share, but do not yet have it, to enter the Chinese SaaS market.
  • All of the major multinational vendors are moving. Global players have been closely watching the cloud market in China for years, and in 2013 they have made strategic moves. SAP, Oracle, Microsoft, and Infor have adopted different strategies in China based on the strengths and capabilities of their core product and solution offerings, technology stack, and partners. The report will tell you how each of these companies is working to address the Chinese market.
  • Local market leader practices. Large multinational vendors are not the only ones with skin in the game. Major local players in enterprise management software, such as Yonyou and Kingdee, are also working hard and have achieved significant progress in this space. The report will tell you what advantages their global peers need to have and which shortcomings they need to improve upon.
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It's Time To Reinvent BPM For The Age Of The Customer

Clay Richardson

Over the last 12 years, I've seen – and helped drive – a lot of change in the BPM market.  First, I watched BPM move from a heavy focus on integration to a greater focus on collaboration and social interaction.  And then, BPM expanded from highly structured and ‘automate-able’ processes to address unstructured, more dynamic business processes.  It is safe to say that over the last decade, demand for BPM was driven by key characteristics of the "Information Age" - a relentless drive towards improving the flow and sharing of information across people and systems.

Now, the most compelling business cases powering fresh demand for BPM focus on characteristics of the new age we are moving into - what Forrester calls the "Age Of The Customer."  If you look closely at most of today’s BPM initiatives, they tend to hide behind an imaginary firewall that separates what external customers experience and what internal business operations feel they need to be efficient. In this new age, business leaders are waking up to the realization that they can no longer divorce process improvement from the people and systems that touch customers, partners, and customer-facing employees. 

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