3 Ways Data Preparation Tools Help You Get Ahead Of Big Data

Michele Goetz

The business has an insatiable appetite for data and insights.  Even in the age of big data, the number one issue of business stakeholders and analysts is getting access to the data.  If access is achieved, the next step is "wrangling" the data into a usable data set for analysis.  The term "wrangling" itself creates a nervous twitch, unless you enjoy the rodeo.  But, the goal of the business isn't to be an adrenalin junky.  The goal is to get insight that helps them smartly navigate through increasingly complex business landscapes and customer interactions.  Those that get this have introduced a softer term, "blending."  Another term dreamed up by data vendor marketers to avoid the dreaded conversation of data integration and data governance.  

The reality is that you can't market message your way out of the fundamental problem that big data is creating data swamps even in the best intentioned efforts. (This is the reality of big data's first principle of a schema-less data.)  Data governance for big data is primarily relegated to cataloging data and its lineage which serve the data management team but creates a new kind of nightmare for analysts and data scientist - working with a card catalog that will rival the Library of Congress. Dropping a self-service business intelligence tool or advanced analytic solution doesn't solve the problem of familiarizing the analyst with the data.  Analysts will still spend up to 80% of their time just trying to create the data set to draw insights.  

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SAP Is On The Right Track To Address The Pain Points Of Chinese Customers, But It Is Not On The Finish Line Yet

Charlie Dai

On February 9, SAP announced the launch of its next-generation enterprise process application, SAP Business Suite 4 SAP HANA (S/4HANA), in China. This is the third product launch event of SAP globally but it’s the first event during which the product is being launched with customer together.

From my discussions with Chinese customers during the event, I believe that SAP is on the right track to address their major concerns. However, enterprise architecture (EA) professionals in China should take a realistic approach when evaluating the feasibility of the architectural evolution of their enterprise process applications.

  • Chinese clients have suffered from complexity for a long time.As mentioned in my previous report, complexity is one of the key challenges that Chinese companies have faced in their drive to achieve business growth and product innovation, and product innovation must focus on simplicity to enhance customer experiences. This is particularly true when it comes to adopting mission-critical management software. It’s quite normal to hear complaints about the complex user interface, long implementation times, and the significant effort required to maintain and customize software; customization is much more popular and necessary in China than elsewhere due to the need for various types of localization.
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Is Big Data Enough? (Ramping Up For Strata In San Jose)

Brian  Hopkins

I’m ramping up to attend Strata in San Jose, February 18, 19 and 20th. Here is some info to help everyone who wants to connect and share thoughts. Looking forward to great sessions and a lot of thought leadership.

I’ll be setting aside some time for 1:1 meetings (Booked Full)

[Updated on 2/17] - I have set up some blocks of time to meet with people at Strata. Please follow the link below to schedule with me on a first come basis.


[Update] - I booked out inside 2 hours...didn't expect that! I may open up my calendar for more meetings but need to get a better bead on the sessions I want to attend first. Shoot to catch me at breakfast, will tweet out when I'm there.

I’ll be posting my thoughts and locations on Twitter

The best way to connect with me at Strata is to follow me on Twitter @practicingea

You can post @ me or DM me. I’ll be posting my location and you can drop by for ad hoc conversations as well.

I’m very interested in your point of view - data driven to insights driven

I am concluding very quickly that “big data” as we have viewed it for the last five years is not enough. I see firms using words like “real-time” or “right-time” or “fast data” to suggest the need is much bigger than big data – its about connecting data to action in a continuous learning loop.

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Welcome back to integration technologies!!!

Henry Peyret

There’s a renewed interest in integration technologies due to new needs for integration to mobile, the Internet of Things (IoT), and cloud — but also because integration requirements betwen systems of engagement and systems of record are requiring realtime for seamless boundaries omnichannel, higher volume, with end-to-end security highlight the changes in integration practices. Forrester will soon publish a report about the integration trends around these subjects.

I am happy to pick up this subject again from Stefan Ried after being away from the space for the past six years. Stefan left Forrester in December and I regret his departure, because he was a very passionate analyst and a smart guy to work with.

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Beyond Big Data's Vs: Fast Data Is More Than Data Velocity

Michele Goetz

When you hear the term fast data the first thought is probably the velocity of the data.  Not unusual in the realm of big data where velocity is one of the V's everyone talked about.  However, fast data encompasses more than a data characteristic, it is about how quickly you can get and use insight.  

Working with Noel Yuhanna on an upcoming report on how to develop your data management roadmap, we found speed was a continuous theme to achieve. Clients consistently call out speed as what holds them back.  How they interpret what speed means is the crux of the issue.

Technology management thinks about how quickly data is provisioned.  The solution is a faster engine - in-memory grids like SAP HANA become the tool of choice.  This is the wrong way to think about it.  Simply serving up data with faster integration and a high performance platform is what we have always done - better box, better integration software, better data warehouse.  Why use the same solution that in a year or two runs against the same wall? 

The other side of the equation is that sending data out faster ignores what business stakeholders and analytics teams want.  Speed to the business encompasses self-service data acquisition, faster deployment of data services, and faster changes.  The reason, they need to act on the data and insights.    

The right strategy is to create a vision that orients toward business outcomes.  Today's reality is that we live in a world where it is no longer about first to market, we have to be about first to value.  First to value with our customers, and first to value with our business capabilities.  The speed at which insights are gained and ultimately how they are put to use is your data management strategy.  

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Time To Reset Your Knowledge Of Big Data Ecosystems In China

Charlie Dai

At the China Hadoop Summit 2015 in Beijing this past weekend, I talked with various big data players, including large consumers of big data China Unicom, Baidu.com, JD.com, and Ctrip.com; Hadoop platform solution providers Hortonworks, RedHadoop, BeagleData, and Transwarp; infrastructure software vendors like Sequotia.com; and Agile BI software vendors like Yonghong Tech.

The summit was well-attended — organizers planned for 1,000 attendees and double that number attended — and from the presentations and conversations it’s clear that big data ecosystems are making substantial progress. Here are some of my key takeaways:

  • Telcos are focusing on optimizing internal operations with big data.Take China Unicom, one of China’s three major telcos, for example. China Unicom has completed a comprehensive business scenario analysis of related data across each segment of internal business operations, including business and operations support systems, Internet data centers, and networks (fixed, mobile, and broadband). It has built a Hadoop-based big data platform to process trillions of mobile access records every day within the mobile network to provide practical guidelines and progress monitoring on the construction of base stations.
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Information Governance: Not A Product, Not A Technology, Not A Market

Cheryl McKinnon

The Information Governance report is out! Over the last few months I've test-driven my thoughts and data with many vendors and enterprise customers via conference presentations, webinars, and one-on-one discussions. For those who have shared their thoughts with me - thank you! Forrester subscribers can access it here.

Information Governance is red hot right now, and it was time for Forrester contribute a view on how IG helps companies meet their core corporate missions. Of course, better, consistent fulfillment of compliance obligations is essential, but so are objectives such as customer service, revenue growth, and improved agility in oh-so competitive markets. IG is not just about getting rid of junk content, it is - more importantly - about instilling trust in the data and communication we use to run our businesses.

Software is not a silver bullet for information governance. Look beyond vendor hype - IG is not something to go buy so you can say your company has it. Look at IG as an evergreen corporate objective, enabled by programs, policies, people- and yes, a range of technologies.

I'm going to add to the IG definition war this week, by describing information governance as:

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The Theory of Data Trust Relativity

Michele Goetz

Since the dawn of big data data quality and data governance professionals are yelling on rooftops about the impact of dirty data.  Data scientists are equally yelling back that good enough data is the new reality.  Data trust at has turned relative.

Consider these data points from recent Forrester Business Technographics Survey on Data and Analytics and our Online Global Survey on Data Quality and Trust:

  • Nearly 9 out of 10 data professionals rate data quality as a very important or important aspect of information governance
  • 43% of business and technology management professionals are somewhat confident in their data, and 25% are concerned
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Episode Three Of The China Cloud War: The Rise Of AWS And Azure’s Critical Moment

Charlie Dai

The cloud market in China is changing fast. The official launch of the commercial operations of Microsoft Azure (Azure) earlier this year started a new chapter (as detailed in my March blog post), while last weekend’s Amazon Web Services (AWS) summit was held in China for the first time and announced the third episode of this war. AWS is speeding up building its ecosystem and starting to challenge both Microsoft’s early-mover advantage and the market share of other global and local players.

To help CIOs and enterprise architects set up their hybrid cloud strategy in the region, we’ve put together a brief comparison of the Azure and AWS offerings and ecosystems in China:

  • Operations.Microsoft made Azure available for preview in China on June 6, 2013 and announced its commercial launch on March 25, 2014, stating that it would be operated by 21ViaNet and have a service-level agreement (SLA) of 99.95%. It has two dedicated data centers in Beijing and Shanghai. AWS announced the availability of its “Beijing region” in China on December 18, 2013, but it still hasn’t announced its official commercial launch, other than a partnership with Cloud Valley. Currently, AWS has only one data center in Ningxia province.
  • Offerings.Azure offerings cover services for compute (VM, websites, cloud services, etc.); data (storage, SQL database, HDInsight, backup, etc.); applications (service bus, Active Directory, CDN, media services, notification services, etc.); and networking (virtual network, Traffic Manager, etc.). Azure also provides other solutions, such as infrastructure services, data management, and application development and deployment.
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The Cloud Foundry Foundation: The Key Driver Of A Breakthrough In PaaS Adoption

Charlie Dai

The rise of the DevOps role in the enterprise and the increasing requirements of agility beyond infrastructure and applications make the platform-as-a-service (PaaS) market one to watch for both CIOs and enterprise architecture professionals. On December 9, the membership of Cloud Foundry, a major PaaS open source project, announced the formation of the Cloud Foundry Foundation.

In my view, this is as important as the establishment of OpenStack foundation in 2012, which was a game-changing move for the cloud industry. Here’s why:

  • PaaS is becoming an important alternative to middleware stacks. Forrester defines PaaS as a complete application platform for multitenant cloud environments that includes development tools, runtime, and administration and management tools and services. (See our Forrester Wave evaluation for more detail on the space and its vendors.) In the cloud era, it’s a transformational alternative to established middleware stacks for the development, deployment, and administration of custom applications in a modern application platform, serving as a strategic layer between infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) and software-as-a-service (SaaS) with innovative tools.
  • Cloud Foundry is one major open source PaaS software. Cloud Foundry as a technology was designed and architected by Derek Collison and built in the Ruby and Go programming languages by Derek and Vadim Spivak (wiki is wrong!). VMware released it as open source in 2011 after Derek joined the company. Early adopters of Cloud Foundry include large multinationals like Verizon, SAP, NTT, and SAS, as well as Chinese Internet giants like Baidu.
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