Disrupt Processes To Build Your Customer-Obsessed Operating Model

Clay Richardson

A few months ago, I had a horrible customer experience around test-driving a new luxury car. The company's marketing department invested a lot of money on different campaigns to get me to make an appointment for a test drive. They succeeded, But once I got to the showroom for the appointment, the experience was a complete 180-degree turn from the red-carpet marketing experience. In fact, I was told they were too busy for a test drive and they requested I come back in two weeks. Needless to say, the experience was a #BIGFAIL on the part of the carmaker.

We see this all too often. Disconnected business processes, fragmented customer communications, and poorly thought-out execution around critical customer experiences. This lack of focus on process coordination around customer experiences robs companies of potential revenue and brand value

Contrast this with the experience I had while visiting a Tesla Motors store recently. While I was in the store browsing different car models and speaking with a Tesla spokesperson, a steady stream of existing Tesla owners popped into the store to rave about how great the brand was and how much they loved driving their cars. 

It's easy to see that brands like Tesla run their companies from a customer-obsessed operating model. And at the heart of this customer-obsessed operating model is a relentless focus on calibrating business processes to deliver seamless, connected experiences at each step of the customer journey. This shift to customer-obsessed operating models requires BT organizations to disrupt existing processes and focus efforts to:

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“Big Data” Has Lost Its Zing – Businesses Want Insight And Action

Brian  Hopkins

I saw it coming last year. Big data isn’t what it used to be. Not because firms are disillusioned with the technology, but rather because the term is no longer helpful. With nearly two-thirds of firms having implemented or planning to implement some big data capability by the end of 2015, the wave has definitely hit. People have bought in.

But that doesn’t mean we find many firms extolling the benefits they should be seeing by now; even early adopters still have problems across the customer lifecycle. Can your firm understand customers as individuals, not segments? Are analytics driving consistent, insightful experiences across channels? Does all that customer insight developed by marketing make a bit of difference to your contact center agents? If you're like most firms, the answer is, “Not yet, but we're working on it.”

What’s more, firms expect that big data will deliver the goods. In fact, about three in four leaders tell us that they expect big data analytics to help improve and optimize customer experiences. That's a huge expectation!

I think big data is going to be a big letdown when it comes to customer engagement and experience optimization.

Here's why – big data is about turning more data into insight. In fact, our latest data and analytics survey tells me that big data plans are still overwhelmingly an IT department thing. As such, they have fallen victim to supply side thinking – just furnish the data and the technology, “the business” will do the rest. Really?

Big data will not help you:

  • Ensure insights are tested for value against business outcomes.
  • Deliver insights at the point of decision in software.
  • Close the loop between actions, digital reactions, and learning.
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Content In The Cloud Is The Next Frontier: IBM And Box Partner To Transform Work

Cheryl McKinnon

Today, IBM and Box announced a partnership and integration strategy to “transform work in the cloud." This is an interesting move that further validates Forrester’s view that the ECM market is transforming — largely due to new, often customer-activated, use cases. We also see that the current horizontal collaboration market is shifting to better target specific work output, as opposed to more general-purpose knowledge-dissemination use cases.

 

What does this partnership mean for IBM, Box, and their partners and customers?

 

For Box, the company gets important access to the extensive IBM ecosystem: Global Services, developer communities via IBM’s Bluemix platform, and the IBM-Apple MobileFirst relationship, as well as engineering acceleration to fill gaps in its content collaboration offering in areas such as capture, case management, governance, and analytics, including Watson.

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A Travel Nightmare: How To Ignore Data, Remain Clueless, And Anger Your Customers

Brian  Hopkins

Firms are blowing opportunities to engender their customers’ lifelong loyalty. Here’s an example from my own recent experience:

As an analyst, I fly 100,000-plus miles with a preferred airline every year, and I’m a mobile mind-shifted consumer; therefore, I have made some assumptions that have led to an expectation. Assumption — weather delays are not a new phenomenon in travel; assumption — the technology to analyze data and communicate with passengers has been around for a while now, and my big airline that is bleeding money out of its ears should have invested in it; expectation — my airline is going to use my mobile device to understand and take care of me because I’m important to them.

Here’s a summary of how that turned out not to be the case and how my airline could have used systems of insight to handle a bad situation and secure my lifetime loyalty:

Data they had access to: Weather projections over Chicago.

  • Insight they should have had: My aircraft had a high probability of flying right into a bad system.
  • Action they could have taken: They could have rebooked me before I got on the plane.
  • What actually happened: I was stranded in Chicago when a tornado touched down at about the same time I did.
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Yellow Elephants and Pink Unicorns Don't Tell The Real Big Data Story

Michele Goetz

Big data and Hadoop (Yellow Elephants) are so synonymous that you can easily overlook the vast landscape of architecture that goes into delivering on big data value. Data scientists (Pink Unicorns) are also raised to god status as the only real role that can harness the power of big data -- making insights obtainable from big data as far away as a manned journey to Mars. However, this week, as I participated at the DGIQ conference in San Diego and colleagues and friends attended the Hadoop Summit in Belgium, it has become apparent that organizations are waking up to the fact that there is more to big data than a "cool" playground for the privileged few.

The perspective that the insight supply chain is the driver and catalyst of actions from big data is starting to take hold. Capital One, for example, illustrated that if insights from analytics and data from Hadoop were going to influence operational decisions and actions, you need the same degree of governance as you established in traditional systems. A conversation with Amit Satoor of SAP Global Marketing talked about a performance apparel company linking big data to operational and transactional systems at the edge of customer engagement and that it had to be easy for application developers to implement.

Hadoop distribution, NoSQL, and analytic vendors need to step up the value proposition to be more than where the data sits and how sophisticated you can get with the analytics. In the end, if you can't govern quality, security, and privacy for the scale of edge end user and customer engagement scenarios, those efforts to migrate data to Hadoop and the investment in analytic tools cost more than dollars; they cost you your business.

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OpenStack Is Moving To A New Stage

Charlie Dai

Unfortunately, visa issues prevented me from attending the OpenStack summit in Vancouver last week — despite submitting my application to the Canadian embassy in Beijing 40 days in advance! However after following extensive online discussions of the event and discussing it with vendors and peers, I would say that OpenStack is moving to a new phase, for two reasons:

  • The rise of containers is laying the foundation for the next level of enterprise readiness. Docker’s container technology has become a major factor in the evolution of OpenStack components. Docker drivers have been implemented for the key components of Nova and Heat for extended computing and orchestration capabilities, respectively. The Magnum project aiming at container services allows OpenStack to create clusters with Kubernetes (k8s) by Google and Swarm by Docker.com. The Murano project contributed by Mirantis aiming at application catalog services is also integrated with k8s.
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Cloud Foundry Is Evolving Toward Agility Via Container-Empowered Micro-services

Charlie Dai

The Cloud Foundry Foundation held its 2015 Summit recently in Santa Clara, attracting 1,500 application developers, operation experts, technical and business managers, service providers, and community contributors. After listening to the presentations and discussions, I believe that Cloud Foundry —one of the major platform-as-a-service (PaaS) offerings —is making a strategic shift from its traditional focus on application staging and execution to a new emphasis on micro-service composition. This is a key factor that will help companies gain the agility they need for both technology management and business transformation. Here’s what I learned:

  • Containers are critical for micro-service-based agility. Container based micro-services are getting momentum: IBM presented their latest Bluemix UI micro-services architecture; while SAP introduced their latest practice on Docker. Containers can encapsulate fine-grained business logic as micro-services for dynamic composition, which will greatly simplify development and deployment of applications, helping firms achieve continuous delivery to meet dynamic business requirements. This is why Forrester believes that the combination of containers and micro-services will prove irresistible for developers.
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Enterprise Mobile Application Technologies TechRadar

Pamela Heiligenthal

I am launching an upcoming TechRadar methodology report that will look at the technologies that enable enterprises to deploy, monitor and manage mobile applications and company-owned devices, as well best practices to help refine our research.

I've identified eight technologies in this space:

  • Beta Distribution Tools
  • Enterprise Application Stores
  • Enterprise Mobile Management
  • Image Management and Configuration
  • Mobile Application Management
  • Mobile Application Performance Management
  • Mobile Device Management
  • Mobile Operations Management

Ultimately, we hope to accurately predict the long-term viability and business value of each technology over the next 5-10 years.

Your level of insight would be invaluable for me to complete this research. If you are interested in participating, feel free to leave a comment below or send an email to pheiligenthal@forrester.com and I will send you the details.

In appreciation for your time, we will provide you with a courtesy copy of the final report. Credit for your company’s participation will also be attributed unless you wish to remain anonymous.

Systems Of Insight Will Power Digital Business

Brian  Hopkins

In digital business analytics, only delivering insight at the point of action matters. Did your customer get the right information, in context, at her moment of need? Did your firm use that engagement to make the right offer and up sell? Do your sales or call center reps have the insight they need to set priorities or meet customers needs efficiently? Talk of big data, advanced analytics, and agile BI is all about turning data into insight. But that is only part of the solution. How is your firm systematically testing insights and finding those that matter? How are you embedding insights in the software that your customers and employees use to engage? Are you even thinking about how to tap all the data that results from that engagement to find out what worked and what didn’t?

If you are not addressing all of these holistically, then Hadoop and that shiny new predictive analytics or streaming tool that sit on it are going to leave your business wanting. Don’t get caught in the trap.

My colleague Ted Schadler and I spent a year researching what it really takes to be successful; we found many companies drowning in data and starving for insight that made a difference. But a few leaders were working at the beginnings of closed loop systems to: 1) discover the insights that matter most; 2) embed them into the software their customers and employees use to engage; and 3) continuously measure and learn from the results.

We call these “systems of insight” and believe they will be the engines that power the digital business of the future.

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Microsoft Azure In China

Charlie Dai

Have you seen the movie Birdman — the one that just won the Best Picture and Best Director Oscars? It’s about a middle-aged man who was once a popular movie star but has been criticized throughout his career and how he finally achieved a breakthrough performance and found great success in a Broadway production of the play What We Talk About When We Talk About Love.

The story of Microsoft Azure is similar. Microsoft was hugely popular in the age of the PC but has sailed into troubled waters in the cloud era. But now — a year after Azure’s commercial launch in China — CIOs and EA professionals must understand how and where Azure might impact their existing MSFT technology investments to achieve business transformation. Azure is one of the leading forces driving cloud adoption in China. We attribute this to the progress that Microsoft has made by:

  • Expanding product offerings.Microsoft Azure now has local products in four key categories: compute, network, data, and application. Beyond basic components like virtual machines, websites, storage, and content delivery networks, Azure also has advanced features that are important for Chinese customers to address their unique challenges, including mobile services for the rapid development of mobile apps to accommodate the massive shift to mobile; a service bus for integration to eliminate information silos in the cloud; and HDInsight for big data capabilities to gain the customer insights necessary to compete with digital disruption from local Internet companies.
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