Outsourced AR Isn't Making The Connection To Their Sales Enablement Value

A lot of emerging companies think they've "arrived" when they've launched their first analyst briefing "tour." Oftentimes, these start-ups have very small to no marketing function internally, instead turning to outside agencies for public relations, marketing communications, and of course, the debut to the analyst influencers. These small firms feel confident that once they've placed themselves in the hands of the seemingly capable agencies, they'll get all the ink and influence needed to execute the hockey-stick growth curve they've presented to their board and investors. The agency then scurries off, schedules a bunch of analyst briefings, and gives themselves a big pat on the back: mission accomplished! The appointed briefing time comes, the firm's show dog delivers the pitch, and then. . . the promise of a successful briefing fizzles.

Earlier this week, I had a briefing with just such a start-up. The agency dutifully sent me the slides in advance and, as analysts are inclined to do, I took a look. . . and was left wondering just what value this agency was providing to this client. Why? The slide deck, while short, did nothing to sell this company to me, the analyst. Here's the start-up's value proposition:

To this end, Company X seeks to design a system leveraging the latest technologies and utilizing a common processing engine and user interface to provide an integrated, easy-to-use, cost effective solution for financial institution.

Huh?

The start-up's strategic direction?

Our goal is to provide a product that:

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Clients Ask The Darndest Things (About Their Big Business Issues)

I’m going to admit something here. . . most of my fellow analysts here chuckle when I profess my love for the insurance industry. Why do I like it so much? Well, one reason is because when I do my "Carney. . . like Art" spiel when someone asks how to spell my last name, insurance people "get it". Yep, they watched "The Honeymooners" and "The Jackie Gleason Show" and know exactly what I’m talking about, unlike most of my co-workers who, with the "Carney. . .

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How To Lose Sales Without Even Trying

There's one sure way to amp up the tension between bag-carrying sales folks and the sales enablement teams that support them, and that's when a sales exec misses the opportunity to get a meeting with a buyer.  

Last summer, we talked to about 40 sales execs or managers and no surprise, when it came to supporting the sales effort this was the area where sales execs told us their respective companies performed weakest. How is supporting that buyer access manifest? Providing the sales org qualified leads, of course. . .

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Sales Enablement Stone Age Edition: You Can’t Make Stuff Like This Up

Yesterday, Brad Holmes blogged about 2010 being the year where sales enablement moves from concept to reality. Yep, it's tempting to think that tech firms and their marketers have all been madly working to enable the sales organizations with fabulous sales-enabling digital media like video customer testimonials, blogs, tweets, Facebook pages, and, of course, the company Web site. But once in a while, you get reminded that some companies have a long way to go just to cover the basics, never mind get to what Brad called a "breakthrough."

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The Great Escape: Role Model For Enabling The Great Sale

Who’s Your Real Customer? The Answer Might Surprise You

Ellen Carney [Posted by Ellen Carney]

 

Every once in a while, I come across one of those situations where the answer seems so obvious that I have to wonder if they already know the answer, but just want to know what you’re going to say. You know, like Perry Mason asking the question, but he already knows the answer?

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What Do Swedish Putty And Product Demos Have In Common?,

Ellen Carney [Posted by Ellen Carney]

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Re-Engineer The Relationship Between Insurance Tech Buyers And Sellers

Ellen Carney [Posted by Ellen Carney]

Insurance IT buyers have distinct preferences when it comes to how they learn about new technology.  Tech vendors think IT buyers learn about the hottest technology because of the bright, shiny stuff that their marketing organizations spend all kinds of time and money producing. Wrong.

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