Pizza Hut iPhone Application

Julie Ask

I'm fascinated by this application on the iPhone. It is rich and entertaining. It makes ordering pizza fun. Includes a game. Includes coupons to motivate purchase - but they aren't pushed out via SMS to trigger the idea of pizza for lunch/dinner.

Is it more marketing or commerce?

The connected nature of the application allows for updates - to the menu (for the basic categories) and promotions. Look forward to seeing this evolve to the point where local restaurant managers can do their own local promotions even based on registered zip codes. I see location-based mobile advertising playing out along these lines nearer term than the auto-tagging of a user's location with an ad to quickly follow.

Would prefer not to have to sign up online. Mobile-only use cases with individuals are limited today, but I think they will grow in number. Cross-channel (Internet to mobile and vice versa) is an interesting idea, but it isn't clear that it is needed or wanted - especially on platforms as capable as the higher end devices like an iPhone or Blackberry, Symbian, Palm etc. devices.  -

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Fortune’s new Global 500 even more global

Zia Daniell Wigder

Zia_Wigder  By Zia Daniell Wigder

Fortune just published its Global 500 2009 list which
outlines the largest 500 corporations in the world.
A few observations on how the list is evolving, with a particular focus on the
top 15 countries (those with eight or more Fortune 500 companies listed this year):

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Why bother with mobile if the experience is going to be so bad?

Julie Ask

I was just looking at a receipt in an email update from B&H Photo in New York. They encouraged me to get an update of my order's status on my cell phone. So, I typed in a long order number and sent the message off to the short code 22634.

I received an SMS back with my order number and a tracking number. The order number was "live" so to speak - I clicked on it and it tried to iniative a phone call. Stupid. The order number wasn't a link to ANYTHING?!?!?!!? Not a quick link to FedEx or UPS. Simply a number. I guess when I can copy/paste on my iPhone in another few weeks, this could prove to be useful information.

In any case, "tracking number" DOES NOT EQUAL "status update." What a terrible user experience and a missed opportunity. Maybe they'll say that they are only part way through the integration into their back end systems, but really, this was lame.

Quick take on UK online retail from a US perspective

Zia Daniell Wigder

Zia_Wigder  By Zia Daniell Wigder

I just returned from a short trip to London where I had a chance to speak with a
series of different UK-based online retailers. Most conversations included at
least some discussion of how the economic climate was affecting the market, both
within the US and the UK. When it
comes to international expansion, the consensus seemed to be that the current
economic environment was driving globalization rather than slowing it down. A
few observations from my conversations:

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Is this your mobile strategy?

Julie Ask

DSC_0197

Many mobile strategies consist of a stand-alone iPhone application.  The iPhone platform is amazing, but with 35,000 applications it no longer offers the buzz or differentiation strategy many brands think it does. Mobile strategies must run deeper and go broader.

Stand-alone iPhone applications remind me of something sitting in a fishbowl for all to see, but with little connection to anything else. So, I took this photo of my cat peering into the fish bowl.

Climbing Out of Our Technology Silos - Good Acquires Intercasting

Julie Ask

Good Technology acquired Intercasting today. In the press release they state the goal of integrated messaging. I think they picked up great talent, too. Shawn has been one of the real thought leaders in mobile and especially around mobile social networking. Handset manufacturers have been trying - and mostly without success so far - to catch up with his vision of what social networking should be on phones.

Separately, I like the vision around messaging. Saw Palm's Pre implementation of integrated messaging yesterday - good stuff. Finally, as consumers we don't need to think about what silo'ed messaging application we want to use. Apple demo'ed similar technology to be released with 3.0 - it doesn't go as far as the Pre, but finally I can stop explaining SMS and MMS to my parents.

I look forward to seeing what they do with the technology.

Utilizing NFC - The Implementation Matters As Much If Not More Than The Technology

Julie Ask

First, I do not attempt to "break" each new implementation of a technology. It simply happens because the implementation has not been thought through. Companies rolling out new services on mobile phones need to think through the user experience. With payments this is even more important. If customers don't feel comfortable with a process they've tried, they will be hesitant to trust and return.

This experience described below is not mobile, but it involves NFC, and one can easily imagine a scenario involving cell phones which could go horribly wrong.

I drove myself to SFO (San Francisco airport) last week for a one-day business trip. I pulled up to the gate at the entrance of the parking garage to collect my ticket. Suddenly, my Speedpass "beeps." I think, "What?"

I roll down my window and there stands a parking garage attendant. She confirms that I want to use this prepaid SpeedPass to pay for my parking. (Please keep in mind that the cost of parking for one day will exceed the average balance that I carry on the card that I use to cross bridges in the Bay Area about once a month.) I tell her that I do NOT want to use SpeedPass to pay - I want to use my American Express card. (Ok, SpeedPass tied to my Amex card, but I don't want to use it this way.) She asks why as she undoes the recording of the time/date on my SpeedPass. I tell her that I am traveling for business and need a receipt. Duh?  She scowls and punches a bunch of buttons on the machine so that it spits out a ticket for me.

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Mobile Boarding Passes - Second Attempt in May 2009

Julie Ask

First, there are several people using the mobile boarding pass - all carrying around thick, smartphone-esque devices with large color screens. Walked up to the TSA agent checking ID's. She had a machine. I just waved my cell phone in front of the scanner, and my information popped up on a single, monochrome text line. She cross-referenced with my ID, and I was on my way. Easy.

Mobile Boarding Passes - My First Attempt in December 2008

Julie Ask

My first attempt at using a mobile boarding pass was back in December 2008 with Continental Airlines. I was flying from Cleveland, OH to San Francisco, CA. I used a PC to log in and opted to use a mobile boarding pass rather than print a boarding pass. I used a URL sent to my Gmail account to open up a web page with the boarding pass on my iPhone.

The boarding pass was easy to get on the cell phone, but hard to use in the airport because the right technology, processes and ground crew education were not in place. A mobile strategy can't stop with the design of the mobile component only - there must also be consideration and design of the processes and education for the folks interacting with the cell phone technology in the physical location.

Here is an account of what happened at the airport:

I walked up to the counter to check first if the mobile boarding pass would work. I didn't have confidence. The agent looked at me and in the most polite, kind manner said, "Honey, you need a printed boarding pass to get on that plane." I smiled as she printed out a boarding pass for me, and I thanked her for her help.

I proceeded to the security line. My phone is timed to turn off every 60 seconds. Each time I it turns off, I need to enter a security code for it to turn on. So, as I moved through the security line juggling my bags, laptop, etc., I kept tapping my phone to keep the screen lit.

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Landline Disconnects - It's Not Just Young Adults

Julie Ask

We recently got our data back from our annual Benchmark survey of more than 60,000 adults in the US. The percentage who are disconnecting their home phone lines has grown tremendously. My hypothesis on most of these disconnects is that they are college students, kids just out of college sharing apartments, etc.

When my mother told me that she and her husband just disconnected, I was shocked. They have simply given up on the local fixed line company. They split their time between Ohio and Florida. The BSP's are different in each location. The BSP's (in Florida who "get this") allowing them to turn services on for six months of the year and then off again still have their business. Those which are inflexible don't. They have no home phone.