Augmented Reality Graduates From Gimmicks To Utility

Julie Ask

Augmented reality has represented the potential for the magical enhancement of our physical world through digital content. (See report) Too many of the use cases today - especially in marketing - have been gimmicks leaving a user to scratch his head and think, "I don't get it." Some have offered entertainment. Some have delivered games and rewards (e.g., Zappar). A few have offered true utility in a consumer's mobile moment - Amazon, Yelp, or the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (see case study) by simplifying the discovery and consumption of simple, 2D information. 

Finally, we are beginning to see more examples of how augmented reality can offer true utility to consumers in those mobile moments when they are struggling to complete a task. In this example, Mitek uses AR to help correct or guide a consumer's use of the camera to send or input information to a bank or service. This offers one example of why companies need to continue to revisit emerging technologies. They can very quickly move from gimmicky to reality. Mobile shifts consumer expectations very quickly. 

 

Use Forrester's European Retail Segmentation to Understand Complex Customer Behavior

Martin Gill

Digital disruption is both an opportunity and a threat.

 

In the age of the customer, firms that assume that what made them successful in the past will continue to drive competitive advantage in the future are doomed to failure. But as a counterpoint, those firms that embrace the opportunity digital technologies bring to get closer to their customers by creating contextually relevant, personalized customer experiences will thrive. That’s the theory, but what does it look like in practice?

 

This week, two major UK grocery firms paint opposite ends of the digital spectrum.

 

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European Retail Segmentation: Emerging Patterns Of Multitouchpoint Shopping

Michelle Beeson

Consumers are embracing an increasing number of devices and touchpoints to shop – this we know and at Forrester we call this the mobile mind shift. But eBusiness professionals still need to figure out the relative influence each touchpoint has on their customers’ shopping behavior in order to determine where to focus their efforts. Should you follow the likes of House of Fraser with a mobile first web presence? How do your customers use your digital presence for research pre-purchase?

Forrester’s new retail segmentation helps eBusiness executives answer these questions by providing a framework to map out the complex ecosystem of touchpoints and devices their customers use to shop. The segmentation identifies increasingly sophisticated multi-touchpoint shopping behaviors and helps eBusiness executives to identify critical touchpoints to create the most relevant shopping experiences for customers across markets.

Our new report focuses on the nuances of shopper behavior across European markets and Martin Gill’s recent report provides a global overview.

Here’s how European shoppers differ:

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New Mobile Business Models: Uber Finally Opens Its Kimono - A Little, With Uber Rush

Julie Ask

It was just a matter of time. They started with taking people from point A to point B. They gave us some glimpses of what might come by dropping off ice cream and litters of kittens. Uber became (and continues to become) incredibly efficient by matching supply and demand, all from the mobile device. How successful? A valuation of $3.4B back in August 2013. 

Some may argue (and I got this question yesterday from a journalist) "they could have done this without mobile services." I disagree. Mobile has added a level of convenience and improved the customer experience dramatically. Convenience. Convenience. Convenience. Uber has embraced what we call the mobile mind shift and is expertly serving customers in their mobile moments - a concept explored in depth in our upcoming book.

Uber (and similar services) have grown the overall business for private car transportation. What are they cannibalizing? I haven't done this analysis, but for me - I drive less and spend a lot less on parking. Do I spend more on Uber than I would have on parking? Probably, but they are so enjoyable to do business with. (See our customer experience framework).

- Mobile phones (subsidized) are relatively cheap - or at least affordable as a cost of doing business for your typical driver. Dedicated hardware isn't. 

- A mobile app for the drivers (and now cyclists) pinpoints exact pick-up locations PLUS shows the hotspots for demand based on time of day, location, weather, holidays, local events, and probably a hundred other factors. There is no other way to communicate easily to drivers where they should wait to pick up rides. 

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Amazon Dash: Monetizing Mobile Moments At Home

Julie Ask

Amazon is testing a new device to facilitate making a grocery list and ordering groceries through their AmazonFresh service in markets such as San Francisco and Seattle. (See TechCrunch article.) Consumers can add items to the list through voice or by barcode scan. Two things (for me) make this an interesting experiment to watch.

1) Amazon looks to profit from what we call "a mobile moment," a concept introduced in our forthcoming book, The Mobile Mind Shift. Or more specifically in this case, an impulse sales moment. As a consumer, I add an item to my grocery list before I forget. I may or may not order that day - it may be tomorrow, but I will buy it. The Dash adds convenenience - it removes friction from my shopping process. The Dash takes advantage of the immediacy of mobile. (See our report on how to create mobile moments).

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Nokia's New Lumia Windows 8.1 Phones: WIM For eBusiness Professionals

Julie Ask

I had the opportunity to attend Nokia's event in San Francisco yesterday. Stephen Elop (EVP Devices & Services), Jo Harlow, Vesa Jutila and Valerie Buckingham among other executives answered questions. See the press event here. High level take away: they released a series of colorful, large & bright screened devices with INSANE camera capabilities at a wide range of price points.

Their Achilles heal is still apps - or lack thereof. They've made progress. They have 245,000 apps today (compared to Apple's 1M plus) and they are adding 500/day. They are doing well with the 100 most popular apps (think eBay, Facebook, Instagram, etc.). 

Here are a few things that matter to you:

1) More and more consumers will buy these phones. Nokia phones - despite the lack of apps - will become increasingly difficult for consumers to ignore. They have large screens. They are finger-friendly with large icons. They are "glance friendly" - with live content on the homescreen page. They have INSANE photo/video capabilities that can make any of us look like professionals. They are price competitive. I had total phone envy yesterday as I sat there with my small-screened phone. 

2) Your larger competitors will start to build native apps for the Windows family of phones. Many of your focus on iOS and Android today.  (See research) Watch your traffic and device adoption among your customer base. It may not be time yet, but you shouldn't ignore them flat out. 

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Four Takeaways From An Evening Of Omnichannel Retail In New York

Zia Daniell Wigder

Last night we held an event here in New York in which VP & Principal Analyst Peter Sheldon presented some of his recent research on the new omnichannel imperative.  He talked through the state of omnichannel retail today, why omnichannel is now essential for retailers and which changes retailers must make in order to drive their omnichannel initiatives forward. A few takeaways from the event:

Online sales and web-influenced sales now represent the majority of all retail transactions in the US.  This year’s $3 trillion US retail market is dominated by a combination of online transactions and offline transactions influenced by online research (our colleague, Sucharita Mulpuru, documents this trend in our cross-channel retail forecast). Peter pointed out that high-value purchases tend to be the most heavily researched, with some categories like cars seeing extraordinarily high levels of online research prior to purchase.

Retailers are thinking creatively about in-store pickup. Today’s in-store pickup initiatives vary greatly in terms of execution: Not every retailer has determined it’s best to place in-store pickup areas in the back of stores, forcing consumers to walk past a variety of potentially tempting products en route to the pickup area. In Canada, for example, Future Shop (a division of Best Buy Canada) offers items for pickup within 20 minutes of the order being placed online and provides a separate pickup area just inside or outside the front of retail stores. Consumers don’t spend precious time waiting for pickup and navigating to hidden-away pickup areas – instead, the idea is to provide them with time to shop after collecting their purchase.

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Retailers Have Beacon Fever

Adam Silverman

There is no hotter topic in retail today than beacons. These small objects which transmit location information to smartphones based on Bluetooth Low Energy have transformed our retail imagination, conjuring up visions of continuous offers being showered onto customers as they walk the aisles of their favorite grocery store.  The reality is more subdued.  We are still very early in the development of location strategies that leverage beacons and the iBeacon protocol, and retailers need to solve for a variety of challenges such as customer privacy, beacon maintenance, connectivity, and campaign management.

In a recent report titled “The Emergence of Beacons In Retail”, my team digs into this emerging location technology and tackles important topics, including:

  • Beacons require the right combination of hardware and software.  BLE is required as beacons leverage the Bluetooth hardware found on most new smartphones. A mobile app is also required to interface with the beacons, transmitting the location information provided by the beacon to a server, and then receiving the appropriate content back from the server to display on the customer’s mobile device.
  • Beacons enable rich experiences beyond offers.  We all enjoy saving money, and pushing offers to us via beacons will be a popular use case. However it is possible to offer a deeper level of engagement. Based on location, retailers can allow the ability to unlock dressing rooms, authenticate a mobile payment, or provide enhanced service such as preparing your favorite latte as you enter your local coffee shop.
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You Have A Mobile Banking Strategy: Now What? (Discussion Of The Obstacles To Mobile Banking Execution Success)

Peter Wannemacher

For digital teams at banks and credit unions, building a mobile strategy to win, serve, and retain customers is a major undertaking. But even after executive leaders approve a mobile strategy — after the congratulations, confetti, and champagne fade away — digital teams at banks face the challenge of executing on that strategy. The latest chapter in Forrester's Mobile Banking Strategy Playbook outlines how digital business leaders at banks can meet customer needs and business objectives with a mobile banking road map

Our report lays out many commonly-encountered obstacles to mobile banking execution success and how digital teams can overcome these obstacles. Here are a few of the areas the report looks at:

  • Overly ambiguous — or nonexistent — business goals. Clearly articulated business goals should be part of a bank's mobile strategy. But a successful road map also lays out the business objectives and records specific goals for each initiative. As one eBusiness executive at a bank told us, "We literally have a section we call 'What's in it for us?' and we use sticky notes to write out what we think we can gain from each action."
  • Legacy systems and back-end integration. Technology may well be the largest obstacle to executing a mobile banking strategy — especially for larger, traditional banks. As such, successful mobile road maps need to outline how initiatives will plug into existing or soon-to-come platforms and systems.
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Take Your eCommerce Business Global With Our New Playbook

Zia Daniell Wigder

eCommerce revenues are soaring around the globe. This year, the US, Western Europe, and China alone will generate over $800 billion in online retail sales. Growth rates, too, remain staggering in many countries: China’s massive online retail market will more than double between 2013 and 2018, as will Brazil’s. India’s much smaller market will grow by eight-fold during this timeframe.

However, a litany of businesses have failed as they attempted to tap into shoppers outside of their home markets, with many large US and European brands factoring prominently on the list of casualties. eCommerce is no exception: Numerous eCommerce businesses have taken the plunge into new markets, only to find their offerings didn’t resonate with local consumers or they were outsmarted by much savvier local rivals.

What separates successful global eCommerce businesses from their counterparts? Which tactics have proven particularly effective for brands aiming to extend their reach into new markets? What are some of the most common challenges businesses tend to encounter? Our newly published eCommerce globalization playbook helps brands through the thorny process of global expansion. Clients can read our playbook for insights on how to:

Discover and quantify international revenue opportunities. Our playbook includes reports outlining the global opportunity and identifying how eCommerce markets typically develop with time. Our online retail forecasts for the US and Canada, Western Europe, Asia Pacific, and Latin America provide a quantitative look at market sizes and eCommerce trends in these regions.

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