Banks In Spain, Poland, And Turkey Are Paving The Way For Next-Generation Mobile Banking

Aurelie L'Hostis
As Europeans become more familiar with mobile banking, they use it for a growing range of banking tasks such as money transfers and bill payments. Consumers’ behavior will continue to shift as mobile experiences with retailers, airlines, and the Airbnb’s and Uber’s of this world raise expectations about what mobile apps and sites can offer and how convenient they can be to use. Customers across Europe now want access to their accounts 24/7, the ability to perform a range of transactions with only a few clicks, and the possibility to manage their finances directly on their smartphones. 
 
Yesterday we published our "2015 European Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark" report, after evaluating the mobile banking services of thirteen leading European banks. Faced with a fast-moving competitive and technology environment, digital teams at European banks have striven to keep up with customers’ rising expectations. A cluster of banks in Spain, Poland, and Turkey – CaixaBank, Bank Zachodni WBK, mBank, Işbank, Akbank, and Garanti – now stand out as world-class, raising the bar to deliver great customer experiences, create new value, and engage customers in their mobile moments. 
 
Here are some highlights from this research:
 
  • The European banks we reviewed offer extensive mobile transactional functionality. Turkish and Polish banks in particular make it easy for customers to pay a bill directly on mobile.
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Technology Advancements Mean Machine Translation Has Earned A Second Chance

Lily Varon

It's simple math: The sheer volume of translatable website content multiplied by the number of languages needed to globalize can make a translation initiative out of reach. The truth is that machine translation (MT) offers access to otherwise unreadable information for global consumers.

While it’s true MT can't account for context and tone and often fails to grasp the nuances and ambiguities of language, there are several technology advancements improving the quality and efficiency of MT. Additionally, the MT engines offered by language service providers aren't the humble online translation tools of yore. They include complex rules engines and sophisticated algorithms, which are often also trainable and customizable based on industry terminology, resulting in much higher quality translation output.

Before dismissing MT, eBusiness leaders should consider that:

  • Big data has made a big impact. Faster and more sophisticated algorithms allow for greater efficiency and accuracy in translation processes and workflows.MT relies on the coding and matching of languages — a vast and variable data set — thus, it has benefitted greatly from advances in analytics and data processing.  
  • Translation memory is boosting translation quality and efficiency. Translation memories are sophisticated language databases that store already translated content. By leveraging previously translated content, firms can reduce the volume of new content to translate plus improve consistency in translation outcomes.
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Making The Case To Go Global

Zia Daniell Wigder

Today we published the business case report for our eCommerce globalization playbook (client access req’d). In it, we discuss how to think about international expansion and how to win over executives with your plans for global domination. However, as a savvy digital business leader, you must first think through:

Is an international offering right for your brand? Business leaders are often lured into thinking that a global footprint is better than a domestic-only one, and that selling overseas is the only path to long-term riches. This is a flawed assumption. Many successful omnichannel retailers have little or no international presence; even web-only players like Zappos serve a US audience exclusively. Other retailers had a hard time penetrating new global markets and ultimately pulled the plug on their offerings. Don’t assume that having a sizeable global footprint is inherently better than having a singular focus on your own market or dedicating resources to just a few international initiatives.

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For The Third Time In Three Years, Forrester’s UK Mobile Banking Benchmark Has A New Leader

Oliwia Berdak

[This is a guest blog by Alexander Causey]

In 2013 NatWest led the way. Last year Barclays overtook having introduced a range of new app functionality, including being the first in the UK to introduce a digital vault (Barclays Cloud It). And now in our latest report we found Lloyds Bank to have jumped ahead of them both.

Forrester’s 2015 UK Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark was published yesterday and reveals our insights around the state of the UK mobile banking, based on reviews of Barclays, HSBC, Lloyds Bank, Nationwide Building Society, and NatWest.

Lloyds Bank has pulled ahead of its peers with more extensive account management and transactional features. It remains the only bank in the UK which we reviewed that lets customers add a new payee directly in the app. If I’m out and about and need to pay back my friend for some tickets, I don’t want to have to wait until I get home to add a new payee through my online banking (yes, yes I know…we could use Paym to make a P2P payment but for the sake of this argument, let’s say these are very expensive tickets). I want to be able to add a new payee and send the money then and there - in my mobile moment.

Lloyds Bank is also making strides through its Everyday Offers. By partnering with Cardlytics, the Lloyds Bank app presents customers with relevant cash-back offers based on their past transaction history.

That’s not to say that the other banks are not doing great things. One of my favorite features is Nationwide’s Quick Balance, which lets customers view their account balance in just one click and without the need to login.

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Selling Digital Goods Or Online Services Requires A Flexible Commerce Platform

Lily Varon

Consumers and enterprises alike are increasingly shying away from buying digital content, services, and software outright. Instead, these businesses are embracing alternative business models where they lease or rent access to digital products and services. The disruption to traditional business models is widespread and accelerating across all verticals of digital product distribution, with high profile digital disruptors like Adobe, Netflix, and Salesforce driving changes in the way consumers and enterprises pay for, and engage with, digital products.

Today we see that:

  • Business model changes are accelerating in the digital goods marketplace. Today's digitally connected consumer is increasingly eschewing the traditional ownership model of buy, download, install, and use. Consumers want access to digital content and services across their connected devices, anytime, anywhere — and are embracing virtual ownership models that provide access to vast libraries of content, services, and products under subscription, usage, and other emerging ownership models.
  • A different set of features and services are fundamental for digital goods sellers. Many of the features and capabilities found in enterprise eCommerce platforms are directly transferrable to selling digital goods or online services. However, most of these retail-focused solutions lack the unique features and services needed to sell digital products and services online, including flexible cross selling and bundling, asset protection, subscription management and entitlements among other features.
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Scotiabank Uses Mobile Messaging To Increase Digital Sales

Peter Wannemacher

[Note: This blog post is based on a new Forrester research report; clients can read the full text here.] 

Two years ago, digital executives at Scotiabank looked at the state of mobile banking and recognized the opportunity to roll out targeted mobile marketing to existing customers using the firm's mobile apps. At the time, too few banks were leveraging mobile as a marketing, sales, and cross-selling touchpoint — a problem that is still evident among US banks.

But rather than simply throwing random banner ads at mobile banking users, the digital team at Scotiabank opted to take a targeted approach that served up relevant offers in the user's context, made the "buy" task flow as convenient as possible, and put the bank in position to expand the effort in future years.

As a result, digital executives at Scotiabank have seen mobile cross-selling rates — as measured by year-over-year growth in unit sales via mobile banking — more than double, up 165% since the firm launched this effort.

Scotiabank’s mobile cross-selling initiative is just one example of a brand embracing the idea of mobile moments. Forrester’s wider research shows that mobile moments are becoming a major battlefield in banks’ efforts to win, serve, and retain customers.

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No Big Bank Leads In US Mobile Banking

Rachel Roizen

[this blog post was co-authored by Peter Wannemacher]

Forrester has just published its 2015 US Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark. The report reveals important insights about the mobile offerings from the five largest retail banks in the US: Bank of America, Chase, Citi, U.S. Bank, and Wells Fargo. Forrester clients can find the full benchmark report here:

All of these bank brands are relatively strong, providing customers with the services and functionality they’ve come to expect from mobile apps and sites. But perhaps the most significant takeaway from our research is that no single bank is leading: When it comes to mobile, the big US banks are achieving parity, not breakthrough.

  • Overall, the US banks are meeting customer’s needs... The US banks achieved overall scores of 65 or higher out of 100, scoring particularly well for enabling a wide range of touchpoints and transactional features. All five banks have extensive functionality across bill pay transfers and P2P payments, like mobile remote deposit capture and adding a payee from within the app.  
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Competition Remains White Hot In The Canadian Mobile Banking Market

Peter Wannemacher

[this blog post was co-authored by Rachel Roizen]

Forrester has just published its 2015 Canadian Mobile Banking Functionality Benchmark. The report reveals important insights about the mobile offerings from the five largest retail banks in Canada: BMO, CIBC, RBC Royal Bank, Scotiabank, and TD Canada Trust. Forrester clients can find the full benchmark report here:

The Canadian mobile banking market has been highly competitive for years, ever since CIBC became the first Canadian bank to roll out robust mobile banking services more than five years ago. Our benchmark research shows that this remains true today: All of the banks have solid mobile banking functionality that meets customers’ most common needs and expectations.

But different banks excel in different areas of mobile banking. CIBC and Scotiabank received the highest overall scores, each earning an impressive 75 out of a possible 100 in our benchmark. The two banks achieve mobile banking success with strong core banking features plus enhancements in key areas: For example, CIBC offers excellent product research tools, while Scotiabank recently launched a best-in-class help service within its mobile apps (see image below).

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From Shanghai To São Paulo: A Comparative Look At eCommerce In China And Brazil

Zia Daniell Wigder

Over the past few weeks, I spent several days in both China and Brazil speaking with eCommerce executives about the opportunities and challenges in their respective markets. Despite the vastly different market sizes – China’s retail eCommerce market reached $440B in 2014 while Brazil’s came in at $18B – these two countries are similar in that they both dwarf other markets in their regions in terms of online sales.

There are many different ways to look at eCommerce in China vs. Brazil; below are just a few areas in which these markets differ and where they show similarities:

Mobile evolution is at different stages. In China, Alibaba's Q1 2015 results showed mobile to be 51% of GMV across its marketplaces, up from 27% a year ago. In Brazil, by contrast, eCommerce players of all types tend to see lower figures in terms of both GMV and total transactions via mobile. B2W, for example, one of the top players in online retail in Brazil, reported that 16% of orders placed in Q1 2015 were via mobile. As the percentage of mobile revenues grows in both markets, so will expectations of companies’ mobile experiences.    

At Alibaba, overall sales are shifting heavily toward mobile 

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Fitbit IPO: The Road Ahead

Julie Ask

Fitbit made its S1 filing coming off a quarter of astounding growth: $336.8M in revenue – up from $108.8M in Q1 2014. The enterprise generated $48M in net income. Last week we learned it hopes to raise $100M through an IPO. Why would Fitbit IPO now?

There are any number of traditional reasons - raise capital, return money to investors, etc. But what is interesting to debate, however, is the timing of Fitbit’s IPO. Fitbit may have chosen to IPO now so it can:

  • Draft off Apple’s wave. Fitness bands and smart watches have been on the market for years, but sales have been limited – especially for smart watches. Apple’s entry and marketing spend will drive awareness of the category from early adopters on the west coast to mainstream consumers. The tide will lift all boats, as the saying goes.
  • Raise capital at a possible peak. The smart watch may kill off or stymy the growth of lower end fitness bands. The cameras on early mobile phones were not as good as the digital point and shoot cameras or SLR’s owned by consumers, but a camera on hand is better than the one at home in a drawer or closet. The pedometer and sensors on a smart watch may not measure activity with the same precision as a dedicated device, but it may be good enough for many consumers.
  • Take advantage of a market with few IPO candidates. Few small companies will mature enough – let alone show the financial strength – to take their companies public. Many entrepreneurs are building services that make great features rather than great businesses. Their exit strategy is to sell to a Google, Facebook, Salesforce.com, IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, or SAP.
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