Cloud Technologies Will Power The Most Successful Businesses In 2015

What's ahead for cloud computing in 2015? Check out our report for Forrester's take on the most important trends in cloud computing and what you should do about them. In 2014, cloud entered the formal IT portfolio, and technology managers stopped treating cloud as competition. In 2015, cloud technologies will mature into the driving force powering the most successful companies. Cloud enables unparalleled levels of sustained innovation. Companies that harness its power will win, serve and retain customers better than their competitors -- in less time and for less money -- if they take advantage of all the cloud has to offer. But where should you start?

Cloud computing isn't limited to a single technology, service, provider, or deployment model. Our cloud team, including James Staten, Lauren Nelson, Liz Herbert, William Martorelli, and Henry Baltazar, has gathered the most important 2015 trends in public cloud platforms, cloud management, application design, security, service provider strategies, SaaS, private and hybrid cloud. In our ten-prediction report, we describe the current state of the art in cloud, what will happen in 2015, and how you should respond. This report helps you focus on the most important trends first.

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How To Transform Your Technology Infrastructure: Our New Playbook Is Your Guide

I want to join Glenn O'Donnell in introducing The Infrastructure Transformation Playbook. The entire I&O team has been working on research for this playbook in the last year, and we think it should be your starting point as you plan your infrastructure priorities for 2015.
 
Cloud and the digital business imperatives you face in 2015 are the external forces driving this transformation. What it means for your internal organization is now's the time to get serious about service design and service delivery. As Glenn, the research director guiding this playbook, says:
 
"Your future lies not in managing pockets of infrastructure, but in how you assemble the many options into the services your customers needs. Our profession has been locally brilliant, but globally stupid. We’re now helping you become globally brilliant. We call this service design, a much broader design philosophy rooted in systems thinking. The new approach packages technology into a finished “product” that is much more relevant and useful than any of the parts alone."
 
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Docker Will Live Up To The Hype And Containers Will Rule The Cloud. Here's What You Need To Know.

I've been on the road all month talking about business technology speed. The age of the customer is all about speed. Faster time to market, more frequent software releases, automated server deployments, instant cloud scaling…anything that removes friction from the app dev process is hot as we move into 2015.

Docker, the container management juggernaut, has generated some of the most breathless buzz in cloud-land this year. And for once, all the buzz is justified, for a few reasons. Docker's new, but containers are not. Docker makes containers easier to use, so more companies can get the benefits some of the big cloud providers already enjoy. Those include near-instantaneous app launch, rapid scale-out, and server efficiencies much better than traditional virtualization. 

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Why Did HP Buy Eucalyptus?

Were you surprised by HP's decision to acquire Eucalyptus last month? You weren't alone. HP's move to snap up one of the first open source cloud platform projects left many scratching their heads, especially since Eucalyptus had lost much of its momentum in the last 5 years. 

Now that OpenStack has effectively won the battle to be the open source alternative to Amazon Web Services, why would HP, already a major contributor to and vendor of a public cloud platform built on OpenStack, want Eucalyptus? It's not the technology. We think the value lies in the company's AWS API experience, Marten Mickos' open source credibility, and the depth of engineering skill.

Check out Lauren Nelson's, James Staten's, and my take on what this acquisition means for both HP and Eucalyptus -- and what it means for their mutual customers and potential customers.

Benchmark Your Cloud Adoption Today. Don't Fall Behind Your Peers.

Are you ahead of the cloud curve or falling behind your peers?

We are definitely in the hypergrowth phase of cloud computing, and 2015 will be a critical year: spending will jump, platforms will mature and consolidate, and cloud will enter the formal IT portfolio, whether IT likes it or not. Where are you on your journey to cloud?

Check out our Benchmark Your Enterprise Cloud Adoption report, published by my colleague Sophia Vargas and me a few weeks ago. Inside, you'll find selected data from Forrester's Business Technographics surveys that shine light on:

  • The rate of growth for the public cloud market;
  • Where cloud is on enterprise CIO priority lists;
  • How much spending is shifting to cloud, and for which workloads;
  • Which cloud types - public, private, hosted private - are preferred by which buyers;
  • The rate of SaaS solution uptake;
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New Research For The Customer-Obsessed I&O Leader

It’s no surprise that digital disruption is everywhere. Empowered customers are disrupting every industry, and infrastructure and operations (I&O) leaders must adapt to this new reality. We believe that technology management is in the middle of a new evolutionary cycle that will transform I&O from its traditional role as infrastructure provider to a new role as a broker and manager of technology services.

It’s should also be no surprise, then, that cloud and mobile disruption is putting a strain on traditional infrastructure team organizational structures. Consolidated and hybrid cloud infrastructure needs a new organization, and you need to prepare your team for the new business technology era. To do so, you need to encourage your team to develop service management, automation, collaboration, and marketing skills, to name a few. We’re seeing a spike in inquiries about new organization models to speed the path to cloud.

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Understanding Cloud Costs Gets Easier: Amazon Web Services Rolls Out New TCO Calculator

Two years ago, I published one of my most popular reports, Understand The True Cost Of Cloud Services. In it I laid out a model to help compare current infrastructure costs against the costs of running equivalent workloads at a traditional hosting provider and in the AWS public cloud. This type of comparison is often the first step in a company’s journey to cloud. Before you start moving workloads to any cloud provider, are you sure the cost savings are really there? The answer isn’t always obvious, and depends on measuring a set of critical metrics, including:

·       Your application load patterns

·       Your current operations team staff costs

·       Your virtualization consolidation ratio

·       Your storage and network hardware, license and administrative costs

·       Your facilities (space, power, cooling) costs

The problem with cloud cost modeling is that it can be hard to get accurate estimates for current costs – find the right people, ask them for cost details, work through the numbers, verify accuracy, project future costs, etc. – and things that take too long just don’t get done. In our model, we used our Relative Cost of Operations methodology to simplify analysis and focus on what changes when you shift to cloud infrastructure. I also faulted some of the public cloud providers for low-balling cloud costs or hiding assumptions in their own on-line cost comparison tools.

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New AWS Management Tool For VMware Is Just That – A New Tool, Not A Cloud Game-Changer

The new Amazon Web Services Management Portal for vCenter was launched last week and generated a bit of buzz on Twitter and elsewhere. VMware reacted quite strongly, and I think that makes sense in a hyper-competitive cloud market, but it was a bit out of proportion to the real threat posed by the AWS tool.

I doubt most savvy cloud buyers (or VMware admins, for that matter) will think this new plug-in for vCenter is a cloud management tool. It’s not. Like other vCenter plug-ins, it makes it easier for an admin using vCenter to get something done without leaving the wildly popular virtualization management portal (like the P2V or V2V tools of yore). In this case, that something includes VMware-to-EC2 conversions and some basic housekeeping tasks: create an AWS virtual private cloud, launch an instance, etc. Image creation, migration, and basic configuration does not a complete cloud management solution make – there’s a lot more to do to create and manage a hybrid cloud implementation and enable workload portability. But this will make it easier to run conversions to AWS and that irks VMware a bit, since it offers its own public cloud option in vCloud Hybrid Service (vCHS).

Rather than draw attention to how limited the AWS Management Portal is, VMware should use its existence to drive home three important points about the company’s overall cloud positioning:

1) allowing competitors to add plug-ins to manage competing public cloud instances shows that VMware’s not scared to compete for your cloud VMs;

2) vCenter is obviously very sticky and widely used, and AWS wants to get in front of those eyeballs – VMware still has critical admin mindshare; and

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OpenStack Matures With Havana: Good-Enough Monitoring & Orchestration

What’s our advice to those building out an internal cloud management practice? Don’t get overwhelmed by trying to revamp all of your IT management processes Day 1. Cloud’s not supposed to make things harder, remember. Keep three things in mind from the outset and you have the foundation for a cloud management practice: monitor, standardize, and automate.

What you monitor in your cloud dictates what you can manage, of course, so focus first on monitoring what you can control. In a private cloud, that means monitoring the compute, storage, and network resources you’re delivering as a service. In a public cloud, instrument your apps first. Then you need to standardize on a reasonable set of app and infrastructure templates you’ll offer to your cloud consumers. And finally you’ll need to automate the way you build instances of those templates on demand. These are the basics: monitor what you control, offer standardized services from a catalog, and automate how you deliver them.

This week’s OpenStack Summit in Hong Kong comes on the heels of the latest OpenStack release, called Havana. Havana includes two fully integrated projects that have been baking for a while, Ceilometer (monitoring and metering) and Heat (orchestration). These two enterprise-focused features aim to make it easier to build a real production-quality cloud on top of the OpenStack open source cloud building platform.

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CSC Buys ServiceMesh for Hybrid Cloud Management

The independent ISV market for cloud automation software got smaller today with CSC’s announcement that it will acquire ServiceMesh. I’ve been predicting a take-out of ServiceMesh with my inquiry customers for months, but this was faster than I expected. In short, CSC has picked up one of the few independent hybrid/multi-cloud management vendors. The buy makes sense for several reasons:

CSC needs a unified service catalog, orchestration, and governance platform to pull together its successful and growing cloud business and enable faster enterprise cloud migrations to its multiple cloud offerings (public, virtual private, private). The enterprise evolution to cloud is step-wise – some apps, some infrastructure, and some business units – and buyers need a partner to help decide which makes the most sense to migrate first, and how. CSC can combine its strong managed services capabilities and IT management tools expertise with the application lifecycle (DevOps) focus of ServiceMesh to reach a powerful cloud buyer: the app owner and developer. Apps are where the cloud action is.

CSC wants to maintain some degree of cloud neutrality, and ServiceMesh has built its reputation as a cloud-neutral governance and orchestration platform. ServiceMesh focuses first on applications and services, and leaves infrastructure management to the cloud providers. CSC gains a neutral multi-cloud (read hybrid) orchestration suite and ServiceMesh gets the ability to scale on the back of CSC’s global services footprint. I’ve been waiting for some new marquee customers for the ServiceMesh Agility platform and hope the partnership will bear fruit quickly.

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