Oracle Gets Serious About Carbon And Energy Management With Its Acquisition Of Ndevr's GHG Accounting Software

This was quicker than expected. As stated in my last report on the enterprise carbon and energy management (ECEM) software market, we expected that Oracle, among some other players, will catch up on the ECEM market opportunity as it materializes. We projected a period of hypergrowth over the next three years, taking the ECEM software market from an estimated $316 million in 2011 to $903 million in 2013. You'll find our market definitions for carbon and energy management software and overview of the vendor landscape here

Oracle announced on Friday its acquisition of Ndevr's Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Accounting Software with the intent to expand its current portfolio of sustainability solutions and offer improved capabilities to monitor, analyze, and report energy consumption and related emissions. Australia-based Ndevr was founded in 1998 as a JD Edwards partner, has been a certified Oracle partner for 10 years, and employs today approximately 80 consultants.

This acquisition marks the beginning of a stream of consolidation and shakeout activity as the ECEM software market continues to mature. The very small and specialized players will have an especially tough time keeping up with increasingly sophisticated buyers that are moving from selective to enterprisewide implementations and looking for a broader set of capabilities that go beyond pure energy and carbon tracking. However, there will be no time for rest for large players such as Oracle either, as the market will require strong commitment and investment to integrate ECEM capabilities with its sprawling portfolio of ERP and other enterprise software solutions.

The Projected Evolution Stages of Enterprise Carbon and Energy Management Software:

Who will we see next tapping into this growing market opportunity?

Your questions/comments are always welcomed.

Regards,

Daniel

Comments

The timeline, in a broad

The timeline, in a broad sense, makes sense. I believe manufacturing is one industry that to some extent is already facing the need and will continue to grow at a much rapid pace - irrespective of the passage of any regulations on carbon. Thoughts?