Nokia Takes Over Alcatel-Lucent: Get Ready For A Shift In The Global Network Solutions Vendor Landscape

Nokia and Alcatel-Lucent have entered into a memorandum of understanding under which Nokia will make an offer for Alcatel-Lucent in an all-share transaction. The deal values Alcatel-Lucent at €15.6 billion: Alcatel-Lucent shareholders will own 33.5%, with Nokia shareholders owning 66.5%.

Is this a “marriage of desperation” or two network solution vendors coming together to work on a broader vision for an increasingly connected world? The combination of two relatively small network solutions vendors won’t automatically translate into the formation of a new network solutions powerhouse. Most importantly, will the new Nokia truly differ from its main rivals Huawei and Ericsson as an end-to-end carrier network solution provider? Nokia’s competitors will not only face a larger new competitor but also experience the formation of a different one. This deal will mean that:

  • Nokia joins the small club of converged network solutions vendors. Customers expect experiences that support multiple screens and applications; equipment vendors must deliver solutions for the Internet of Things (IoT) and industrial Internet requirements by offering next-generation network technology and services. Nokia can’t cater to this market demand alone.
  • Nokia rejoins the premier league of network solutions providers. The deal means that Nokia’s total pro-forma 2014 revenues will more than double to €25.9 billion. The new Nokia will be the second-largest provider of carrier-grade telecoms networking solutions, with revenues in this segment of €25.0 billion, just behind Ericsson (€25.1 billion) but ahead of Huawei (€23.5 billion). With its newfound size, Nokia will gain access to scale benefits.
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Samsung Commits To The Business Segment At CeBIT 2015 With IoT Solutions

Samsung launched its business offerings at CeBIT 2015. Samsung Business is a new brand and combines Samsung’s Knox for security and enterprise mobility management, Smart Signage, and printing. Samsung Business offers industry-specific solutions for retail, education, hospitality, transportation, healthcare, and financial services.

In retail, Samsung offers digital mirror and video wall devices. School Solution integrates its mobile devices with interactive learning tools. Its Smart Hotel Solution offers premium in-room experience and information bulletin touchscreens. The Preventive Mobile Cardiac Rehabilitation solution enables real-time monitoring of chronic conditions. For financial services, Samsung provides secure document handling and printing services. And its transportation solution provides real-time information and analysis of data. My main takeaways:

  • Samsung Business is a good first step toward catering to businesses. Samsung has enormous potential to leverage its existing consumer device expertise and experiences, especially in the B2B2C space. Samsung is right to opt for an open and collaborative Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem to overcome the challenges of platform compatibility, data analysis, and security. Samsung has a long track record in focusing on user experience. This should help it deliver high-quality and intuitive-to-use business solutions.
  • Samsung’s sector solutions are still rather basic. At this stage, Samsung is right to focus on a handful of offerings that it is familiar with and can deliver with high quality. However, Samsung will need to drill down deeper into business processes and business models to become successful in the emerging world of IoT longer term.
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How Data Can Enable Business Disruption: Traditional Retailers Must Take Note Of The Sharing Economy

Recently, I talked with the CEO and founder of reBuy about the shifting dynamics in the retail sector as a result of digitalization. The use of data has evolved to the point where data has become the enterprise’s most critical business asset in the age of the customer. The business model of reBuy reCommerce — the leading German marketplace for secondhand goods — can help CIOs understand how the intelligent use of data can significantly disrupt a market such as retail.

The case of reBuy offers interesting insights into how the wider trends of the sharing and collaborative economy affect retail. If you can buy a good-quality used product with a guarantee for half the price, many people will not buy the product new. Many consumers increasingly accept product reuse and see it as an opportunity to obtain cheaper products and reduce their environmental footprint by avoiding the production of items that wouldn’t be used efficiently. The reBuy case study highlights that:

  • Business technology is taking the sharing economy into new realms. The reBuy business model demonstrates that consumers are starting to push the ideas of the sharing economy deep into the retail space. CIOs in all industries must prepare for the implications that this will have for their businesses.
  • Standalone products are at particular risk of sharing dynamics. The example of reBuy shows that businesses that sell plain products will come under even more pressure from shifting shopping behavior, where people are increasingly satisfied with buying used goods. These businesses need to add value to those products that are not available for secondhand purchase.
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Observations From Mobile World Congress 2015 From A CIO's Perspective

Mobile World Congress (MWC) was a real marathon: According to my wearable gadget, I walked 70,278 steps, or 53.7 km, in four days. So was it worth it apart from the workout?

MWC was certainly busy; it attracted more than 90,000 attendees, including about 50,000 C-level executives (of whom 4,500 were CEOs) — making it the largest MWC event to date. While MWC does not attempt to cater to CIOs’ requirements — only about one-third of the attendees come from outside the technology sector, mostly from government, financial institutions, and media and advertising firms — the event deals with all the critical topics that CIOs will have to address in the years ahead.

This year’s MWC focused on innovation, which is arguably the single most important business priority to ensure business survival in a rapidly changing marketplace. As a business enabler, every CIO must meet the expectation of today’s business customer that he can get what he wants in his immediate context and moment of need. MWC highlighted that:

  • Mobile is critical to provide a great user experience. Therefore, mobile is becoming a critical factor for CIOs in driving product, service, and process innovation and enhancing customer and employee engagement.
  • Consumerization is redefining enterprise mobility. At MWC we saw more and more vendors targeting the mobile mind shift taking place in the business segment. This is reflected in the shift of most mobile business solutions away from traditional sales and field force automation toward delivering mobile moments.
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Open Data And Trust Play An Important Role In Emerging Digital Ecosystems

Open data is critical for delivering contextual value to customers in digital ecosystems. For instance, The Weather Channel and OpenWeatherMap collect weather-related data points from millions of data sources, including the wingtips of aircraft. They could share these data points with car insurance companies. This would allow the insurers to expand their customer journey activities, such as alerting their customers in real time to warn them of an approaching hailstorm so that the car owners have a chance to move their cars to safety. Success requires making logical connections between isolated data fields to generate meaningful business intelligence.

But also trust is critical to deliver value in digital ecosystems. One of the key questions for big data is who owns the data. Is it the division that collects the data, the business as a whole, or the customer whose data is collected? Forrester believes that for data analytics to unfold its true potential and gain end user acceptance, the users themselves must remain the ultimate owner of their own data.

The development of control mechanisms that allow end users to control their data is a major task for CIOs. One possible approach could be dashboard portals that allow end users to specify which businesses can use which data sets and for what purpose. Private.me is trying to develop such a mechanism. It provides servers to which individual's information is distributed to be run by non-profit organizations. Data anonymization is another approach that many businesses are working on, despite the fact that there are limits to data anonymization as a means to ensure true privacy.

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Mobile World Congress 2015 Promises Greater Focus On Use Cases Away From Technology Obsession

Once again, the mobile world is getting ready for the most important mobile event of the year, the Mobile World Congress (MWC), which will take place in Barcelona from March 2 to 5. In my role as analyst with a focus on CIO requirements, I expect the following themes to dominate this year's show:

  • Everybody will talk about data — and many about data privacy. The long-anticipated marriage between big data and mobility is finally happening. I expect just about every vendor at MWC will claim a stake in these mobile data wedding arrangements. However, many big data business models remain building sites, and it remains far from clear which players will benefit via which types of business models. The growing awareness of regulatory constraints on the use of customer data as well as what the Financial Times recently called the "creepiness quotient", i.e., hyper-personalized advertising, further complicate a convincing business model for mobile analytics on a mass scale. Despite all the hype, mobile data is one of the must-focus areas for CIOs who attend MWC.
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European Telco Merger Momentum Gains Strength As Hong Kong’s Hutchison Buys O2 UK

Telefónica entered into an exclusivity agreement with Hutchison Whampoa regarding Hutchison’s potential acquisition of the Telefónica subsidiary O2 UK for £10.25 billion in cash, valuing the deal at an estimated 7.5 times 2014 EV/EBITDA. The Hutchison-O2 UK deal — should it complete — will entirely redraw the telco landscape in the UK in terms of market shares. The acquisition of O2 UK will transform Hutchison from the smallest mobile operator with 7.5 million customers to the largest with 31.5 million customers and reduce the number of mobile operators in the UK from four to three.

This development follows on the heels of the announcement by Orange and Deutsche Telekom that they have entered into exclusive negotiations with BT Group regarding a potential divestment of 100% of their shares in EE, their joint venture in the UK. The increased merger activity is not surprising, and we predicted as much in our report Predictions 2015: Telecoms Will Struggle To Align To The CIO's BT Agenda. Still, these deals raise important questions for the European telecoms markets:

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Back To The Future As BT Investigates Potential EE Acquisition In The UK

In a move that would boost BT’s standing as the leading integrated telco and increase pressure for competitors, Orange and Deutsche Telekom have entered into exclusive negotiations with BT Group regarding a potential divestment of 100% of their shares in EE, their joint venture in the UK. The purchase price of £12.5 billion on a debt-/cash-free basis would be split equally between Orange and Deutsche Telekom. At a price of roughly 7.8 times EV/EBITDA the deal isn’t outrageously overpriced. So what could this mean for the various market participants? Should the deal go ahead, we believe that the implications for the UK telco market would be significant as:

  • BT becomes once again the leading integrated telco in the land. A deal would have a larger impact on BT’s consumer than its business activities given EE’s customer base of 24.5 million mostly consumer mobile customers. As the strongest 4G LTE provider in the UK, EE would give BT a platform to deliver interesting new bundles such as dedicated sport channels for smartphones and tablets. EE would be an important asset to enhance BT’s already successful retail arm, in particular its IPTV activities, where BT is one of the few telcos that manages to offset the decline in traditional telco services with a new offering. The deal would fail to bring any significant new customer relationships in the business arena. Going forward, however, this would finally provide BT with the opportunity to develop mobile moments for its business customers.
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Your Business Customers Want You To Deliver Great Mobile Moments

Mobile is now becoming a mission-critical service for all businesses. CIOs must support mobile moments, which Forrester defines as points in time and space when someone pulls out a mobile device to get what they want in their immediate context. Mobile moments have spread well beyond consumer scenarios:

  • Your business customers are demanding them. Mobile engagement is critical for all customer relationships and better user experiences – irrespective of whether you are a business user or a consumer. Consumerization has changed this distinction forever. Today, we all expect a great experience – both at home and at work.
  • Your partners and suppliers are working on adjusting their business processes. To ensure smooth end-to-end workflows in these new processes, you need to ensure that your own organization adjusts to their mobile mind shift. Moreover, any mobile offering that depends on an ecosystem of partners relies on end-to-end experiences. Third-party providers can provide productivity improvements for collaboration and workflow efficiency to help with this.
  • Your competitors are exploiting the opportunities that mobility offers. Mobility is quickly becoming one of the most important battlegrounds for business innovation. Your competitors are readjusting and improving their business processes through mobility. Every CIO should have a clear strategy for a world in which every customer, worker, and supplier is hyper-productive, hyper-available, and hyper-engaged.
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Telstra Bets Its Future On All Things Connected

I recently visited Telstra’s “Let’s Connect” Analyst Summit 2014 in Sydney, the analyst event of Australia’s incumbent telecom provider, Telstra. CIOs of MNCs who have been tasked with finding the right provider in Australasia need to balance their requirements for true end-to-end solutions that many tech services providers promise with the need for reliable collaboration and connectivity services as well as cloud and services solutions. Telstra brings attractive assets and strengths to the table regarding these core focus areas. My main takeaways are that:

  • Telstra is a strong network services provider in Australasia. European CIOs who require a strong network service provider in the developed markets of Asia and Australia find a solid partner in Telstra. There Telstra stands out through high-quality network infrastructure and local teams on the ground.
  • Telstra provides telco industry benchmark offerings in healthcare. Telstra is dedicated to becoming a strong provider of healthcare solutions that rely on connectivity. CIOs in the healthcare sector should look to Telstra for solutions such as hospital-in-the-home partnerships, medical care in remote communities, as well as telemedicine services.
  • Telstra takes organizational and cultural transformation very seriously. Telstra is fully aware of the need to transform its organizational structures and operating culture and to transform toward a more service- and software-focused telco. Although this transformation will take time to implement, CIOs will find a network service provider that is committed to transformation at the very top of management.
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