Extended Google Analytics Benchmark Capabilities Threaten To Disrupt

James McCormick

You’ve heard us saying a thousand times: the buzz about big data isn’t about the amount of data you’ve collected; it’s how you digest that data and turn it into actionable insights. With the revamp to Google Analytics’ (GAs) benchmarking, Google is taking the next steps in allowing us common folk to process data in a platform with a simple UI, built to enable you to draw insights to catalyze actionable improvements to your marketing program.

Google’s vision is there. GAs extended benchmarking capability  – available to free and premium users - offers some sparkly new features such as 1600 industry categories (previously 26), size buckets, and location filters that allow for basic segmentation; and, the tool can automatically place you within one of these categories according to your web traffic, etc. Also, you have to give to get: Opting out of allowing Google to collect your information anonymously means you won’t have access to benchmarking features. Given GA’s huge deployment footprint — we’re talking about big time big data and a great opportunity for firms of all sizes and verticals to compare themselves to relevant markets.

But as you excitedly dive into Google’s benchmarking big data lake you should consider that;

  • This isn’t quite ready for enterprise. For the moment the benchmarks can only be viewed via Google reports; and digital marketers will not be able to suck this benchmark data (via APIs etc..) into their favourite dashboarding or BI tool.
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Just Published: The Forrester Wave--Cross-Channel Campaign Management, Q3 2014

Jason McNellis

I cut my teeth as a data analyst helping brands communicate more effectively—building segmentation and targeting models that differentiated contact frequency, offers, and messaging across a brand’s customer base. But in the face of today’s more empowered customers building static scoring models and relying on batch-based campaigns is insufficient to win, serve and retain customers. Today most enterprises rely heavily on technology to help them interact with customers across channels, and as we evaluated in the newly published Forrester Wave: Cross Channel Campaign Management, Q3 2014, brands have several compelling choices.  

We identified, researched, and scored solutions from nine vendors: Adobe, IBM, Infor, Pitney Bowes, RedPoint Global, SAP, SAS Institute, SDL, and Teradata. Our approach consisted of a 41-criteria evaluation; reference calls and online surveys of 96 companies; executive briefings; and product demonstrations.

We identified four leaders in this mature, but evolving category. What sets leaders apart?

  • Depth of cross-channel capabilities. Leaders consistently received high scores in cross-channel data integration capabilities, which includes cross-channel customer identification and centralized response history management. But the purpose of collecting this data is so marketers can make smarter—more customer obsessed—decisions. Not surprisingly then, leaders also receive high marks in areas of interaction management such as cross-channel decision management and real-time analytics.  
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Ease Your Selection Of Customer Analytics Providers In China

Gene Cao

Forrester surveys in China show that business data and analytics are increasing as the No. 1 technology priority for Chinese businesses; 55% of technology decision-makers in the country plan to use data and analytics to improve business decisions and outcomes in 2014, up from 43% in 2013. Chinese digital marketers are looking for powerful tools to better understand customer behavior, especially regarding customer acquisition. Businesses in industries like banking and financial services, telecommunications, and retail understand that data and analytics are critical for enabling business transformation — but they have struggled with a lack of data and analytics tools in the market.

The supply side of the Chinese customer analytics market is fragmented and includes a confusing mix of global and local providers. Most customer analytics solution providers started doing business in China in the early 2000s, when the country became much more open to foreign capital. Companies like Procter & Gamble and Coca-Cola introduced new marketing concepts and became the first to use customer analytics solutions in China. To serve these global companies, leading analytics vendors like FICO, IBM, Oracle, and SAS successfully built up their analytics businesses and extended them into local Chinese markets. Increasing demand for analytics also compelled local vendors like Alibaba and Baidu to start providing customer analytics solutions in China. My latest report, “The Customer Analytics Market in China,” profiles these customer analytics providers in four categories to ease your decision-making on vendor selection.

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Customer Experience Q&A With Carl Mogridge, Head of Digital, Australia & New Zealand, Avon Products, Inc.

Michael Barnes

For many organizations, the digital journey is full of potential roadblocks. Successful organizations excel at overcoming traditional operational practices, approaches, and mindsets to enable change.

For a well-known global brand like Avon, embracing an omnichannel approach to customer engagement was essential to continue thriving in a digital world. We’re therefore pleased to have Carl Mogridge speak at Forrester’s Summit For Marketing & Strategy Professionals: Australia. Carl is head of digital at Avon Products, leading the company’s initiatives to implement systematic, measurable change on the path to digital disruption.

Carl was kind enough to answer a few of our questions about what he’s doing. Those of you who’ll be with us in Sydney this Wednesday, August 13, can hear even more from Carl. I hope to see you there!

Q: When did your company first begin focusing on the customer experience? Why?

Avon is 127 years old and from day one we’ve focused on creating customer-centric conversations based on personalized service and innovative products. At Avon, we want to be helpful, safe, and reliable to our customers — so our entire customer experience strategy revolves around these simple criteria.

Q: How do you determine which aspects of the customer experience you must try to excel at?

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When a Dilemma Becomes a Polylemma

Rusty Warner

In the age of the customer, customer insights (CI) professionals must invest in software solutions that will help them orchestrate contextual marketing.  However, as outlined in Cory Munchbach’s report Let’s Revisit the Enterprise Marketing Technology Landscape (Again), the market is in a state of flux.  Not only are we seeing tremendous M&A activity, but a constant stream of new vendors is flooding an already crowded space with innovative solutions. 

How does the CI pro responsible for marketing technology buying make an informed decision when faced with so many options?  Well, to quote Ron Davies (feel free to summon the voices of Three Dog Night, David Bowie or Shelby Lynne, if you prefer), “It Ain’t Easy!”  To help CI pros with their decision-making, my latest brief The Marketing Technology Buyer’s Dilemma provides advice on how to maintain customer focus while navigating market changes.

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Customer Experience Q&A With Louise Long, Head of Customer Experience, NAB

Michael Barnes

As customers we’re rarely satisfied with simply buying goods and services. What we really want, on top of the actual purchase, is a great customer experience (CX). This drives us to seek out companies that not only understand our wants and desires but more importantly, understand the role their company’s products actually play in our lives.

Nowhere is this more true than in the hyper-competitive Australian retail banking market. That’s why we invited Louise Long to speak at Forrester’s Summit For Marketing & Strategy Professionals: Australia. Louise is Head of Customer Experience at National Australia Bank (NAB), leading the company’s initiatives to deliver truly great customer experiences to NAB’s clients.

Louise was kind enough to answer a few of our questions about what she’s doing. Read on for insight into how NAB continuously seeks innovative ways to ensure that the customer remains at the center of the company’s business strategy.

Those of you who’ll be with us in Sydney on Wednesday, August 13th, can hear even more from Louise. I look forward to seeing you there!

Q: When did your company first begin focusing on customer experience? Why?

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The Evolution Of Consumer Attitudes On Privacy

Fatemeh Khatibloo

With Anjali Lai

The tide is turning on privacy. Since the earliest days of the World Wide Web, there has been an increasing sense that the Internet would effectively kill privacy – and in the wake of the NSA PRISM program revelations, that sentiment was stronger than ever. However, by using our Forrester’s Technographics 360 methodology, which blends multiple qualitative and quantitative data sources, we found that attitudes on privacy are evolving: Consumers are beginning to shift from a state of apathy and resignation to caution and empowerment.

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The Landscape Of Loyalty Providers: Everything But The Kitchen Sink?

Emily Collins

I field a lot of inquires from clients in various stages of loyalty vendor selection projects. Some come with a tightly defined short list, but more often than not, they aren't even sure where to start. Customer loyalty initiatives take several forms including highly structured programs and loosely tied customer service, marketing, and product development tactics spread throughout the organization. As such, vendors of all types -- from loyalty-specific service providers and platforms to customer engagement agencies and analytics service providers -- bring loyalty strategy, management, and marketing chops to the table: 

Loyalty provider categories

With so many different providers knocking on their door, it's no surprise that marketers feel overwhelmed by the selection process. My most recent report cuts through the clutter by organizing loyalty providers into categories based on their core offerings and delivery models. But, before you start dropping vendor names into a shortlist, you first must answer these three questions:

  • How does your company approach loyalty? Take stock of your existing retention tactics and how customers currently interact with your products, services, and brand. Outlining your organization’s approach will help you select new partners but also potentially enrich relationships with existing partners.
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Big Data Analytics Can Help Beijing Cut Through The Smog

Gene Cao

China faces a growing air pollution problem — one of the consequences of its significant economic growth over the past two decades. Surrounded by a large number of coal-burning factories in Hebei province, Beijing faces ever-worsening smog. To tackle this problem, city government has implemented new policies and laws, such as the Beijing Air Pollution Control Regulations, that provide guidance to technology vendors developing smog control solutions.

Source: AFP

Optimized Energy Management Is The Key To Reducing Air Pollution

Beijing’s government is focusing on air quality monitoring and has invited tech vendors like Baidu, IZP Technologies, and Yonyou to develop solutions. The city wants to show the source of pollutants and how they will disperse across Beijing a couple of days in advance — but that doesn’t do anything to reduce the smog itself. Rather, the key to reducing air pollution is changing how China consumes energy. For example, the government could use big data analytics to:

  • Optimize factories’ energy consumption. Asset-intensive industries like steel, cement, and chemicals face challenges in analyzing the vast amounts of data generated by energy-monitoring sensors and devices. Tech vendors like Cisco and IBM could leverage their Internet of Things data analysis technology to help customers turn this data into actionable insights. For example, one steel factory in Hebei province is considering technology that identifies when an oxygen furnace is wasting energy because the temperature of the output smoke is too high.
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Forrester’s Marketing & Strategy Summit Is Coming To Sydney August 13th!

Michael Barnes

I’m thrilled to announce that in less than six weeks’ time Forrester Research will hold its first-ever Summit for Marketing & Strategy Professionals in Sydney, Australia.

The entire Australia team is incredibly excited about this landmark event for Forrester. Here’s why:

The theme for this year’s event is “Winning In The Age Of The Customer.” What does this really mean? It’s simple, really. Empowered by digital platforms, your customers are free — free to act on their own needs and priorities, free to pick their own moments of engagement, free to design their own experiences — and free to ignore your own best efforts to shape and control all three. Forrester calls this new reality “the age of the customer.”

We’ll be releasing some brand-new research at the event that sheds light on the current state of customer experience management practices in Australia. While I don’t want to give away the ending, suffice it to say that Australian firms of all sizes are making customer experience a strategic priority. Firms across Australia increasingly have C-level executives driving their focus on CX, and they expect to get significant value from their efforts.

But not all firms are at the same level of maturity — or even awareness. While some are finding ways to pull ahead of competitors through CX differentiation, others have not even gotten started yet. That’s why we’ve tailored this event to show attendees the one sure path to CX maturity and provide detailed guidance on how to advance along that path.

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